Tag Archives: weight

Women Celebrating Smoke Free Lives

Smoke Free Women is an organization serving as a resource for women who are looking to quit smoking, as well as acting as a support system for women who have already quit.

Approximately one in five American women is a smoker. Almost 80% of them have a desire to quit.

Created by the Tobacco Control Research Branch of the National Cancer Institute, Smoke Free Women offers women and their friends and family help on achieving this goal.

Smoke Free Women: Help Quitting

Stubbed out CigaretteThe Smoke Free Women website offers many different quit-smoking resources, including:

  • an online cessation guide designed by health professionals and ex-smokers;
  • information database on various smoking related issues and quitting topics, such as the benefits of quitting, depression, pregnancy and smoking, second hand smoke, stress and weight concerns, and withdrawal symptoms;
  • various quizzes to help gauge mental status and interpersonal relationships;
  • information for numerous quit lines featuring health councilors and web resources; and
  • a publications library of information on quitting, pregnancy and smoking, smoking later in life, and more.

Celebrating Smoke Free Voices

To celebrate the one year anniversary of the creation of the Smoke Free Women website, the organization established a video contest. This inspiring contest was to provide a platform for people to creatively express themselves in self-made videos that were entered in one of two categories.

The first category was open for videos focusing on the topic “Why I am a smoke free women.” Entrants were encouraged to enter videos that explained why they stay smoke free, their reasons for quitting, and what it means to be a smoke free woman.

Video Winner: Why I am a Smoke Free Woman

The second category was the topic “Why I want YOU to be smoke free,” giving friends or relatives of smokers an opportunity to share why they wanted a loved one to be smoke free.

Video Winner: Why I Want You to be Smoke Free

Smoke Free Women has helped women from across the country with their smoking cessation needs, and the videos of success from these women are truly inspirational.

Reference:  Smoke Free Women [http://women.smokefree.gov]

Bigger Belly May Up Smokers’ Lung Cancer Risk

Reuters Health – Smokers who carry more weight around their waistlines may be at greater risk of lung cancer, according to a new study.

The finding, along with the fact that lung cancer risk is actually higher among leaner smokers, provides “intriguing” evidence that how a smoker stores fat could play a role in his or her likelihood of developing lung cancer, Dr. Geoffrey C. Kabat of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York, told Reuters Health.

Several studies have found that a lower body mass index (BMI) means a higher lung cancer risk among smokers. “Reflex explanations” for the link include the fact that smokers are skinnier than non-smokers, Kabat noted in an interview, as well as the tendency for people to gain weight after they quit smoking.

Another proposed mechanism for the relationship is that people lose weight when they develop lung cancer.

But careful analysis of the data doesn’t bear out these explanations, Kabat said. To better understand the relationship, he and his colleagues looked at data from the Women’s Health Initiative.

Over the course of 8 years, 1,365 of the study’s 161,809 participants developed lung cancer. When the researchers looked at BMI after adjusting for weight circumference, they found that both smokers and ex-smokers with lower BMIs had a greater lung cancer risk.

But when they looked at waist circumference independent of BMI, they found that a larger waistline conferred a greater likelihood of lung cancer for smokers and ex-smokers. There was no relationship between BMI or waist circumference and lung cancer risk among never-smokers.

The findings, reported in the American Journal of Epidemiology, must be confirmed by other investigators, and don’t offer any clues on the mechanism behind the relationship, Kabat noted.

belly fatHowever, he speculated, “it may have to do with the storage, the mobilization, and the metabolization of carcinogens. These carcinogens … tend to be stored in fat tissue. That may play a role in the development of lung cancer. It may be that it’s linked to smoking but that it plays a role on top of smoking.”

He added: “We’re not ready to give people advice, because overall the advice would not be changed. We’re not advocating that people lose weight so that they have a lower risk of lung cancer. Smoking is so far and away the dominant risk factor.”

News Source: American Journal of Epidemiology, July 15, 2008.

Anne Harding, Cancerpage.com