Tag Archives: smoking cessation

Apps for Android Quit Smoking

Stop Smoking with Apps for Android

There are several apps available for android phones that are designed to help users stop their smoking habits and develop an overall healthier lifestyle.

Smoking cessation techniques such as apps can be an effective tool that help relax users, reinforce motivation, and guide them through the rewarding process of quitting.

Given the affordability and the ease of use, smokers will find these apps helpful.

Popular Apps to Help You Quit Smoking

Apps featuring hypnosis:

  • Stop Smoking—Quit Smoking and Feel Relaxed With No Weight Gain (Self Hypnosis, Guided Meditation, Subliminal, Binaural Beats, NLP): This app uses therapeutic, hypnotic audio to help reprogram smokers’ urges, concentration, and motivation during their transition from smoker to nonsmoker.
  • Stop Smoking Hypnosis: Through hypnosis sessions, smokers’ will lose the desire to smoke while remaining positive about the transition.
  • Easy Stop Smoking: Along with relaxing hypnosis techniques designed to help with the quitting process, this app provides users with background videos on how hypnosis works.
  • Quit Smoking Audio Alpha Wave Affirmations: Recondition your habits with the hypnosis offered with this app, followed by a series of positive affirmations.

Apps for Android Quit SmokingApps using graphic images to reinforce quitting:

  • Craving Buster: Using graphic images as a reminder of the consequences of smoking, this app also gives tips on creating a healthier lifestyle.
  • Quit Smoking Now: Using a four step process with graphic images, this app helps smokers get control of their smoking habit.

Track your quitting progress:

  • Cigarette Counter: This app gives smokers a statistical overview of their habit: how often they smoke, how much they spend on cigarettes, and how long it’s been since their last cigarette.
  • I Can Quit Smoking: Not only can users track their progress with this app, they can receive encouraging messages, or send messages to others who are in the quitting process.

Other smoke-free apps:

  • You Can Quit Smoking: A 12 chapter e-book written by a former smoker shows users of this app that it is possible to become smoke-free.
  • Acupressure: Treat Yourself: Learn your body’s self-healing capabilities with this app, including techniques to relieve anxiety associated with quitting smoking.
  • Kicking the Habit: A Smoker’s Guide: This app offers a step-by-step guide on quitting smoking in thirty days and tips for coping along the way.

For help quitting smoking, please click > Apps for Android: Stop Smoking

Users of Smoking Cessation Drug Chantix Experience Increased Aggressive Behavior

Over two million people attempt to quit smoking each year in the United States. Popular methods of quitting include using smoking cessation aids, such as nicotine replacement products or anti-nicotine medications.

Common effects of smoking cessation include increased levels of irritability and anxiety as the body adjusts to the lack of nicotine.

One common smoking cessation aid, anti-nicotine medication Chantix, has been linked to abnormal levels of aggression and violence amongst its users.

Pfizer’s Smoking Cessation Aid Chantix

Chantix is a smoking cessation aid manufactured by pharmaceutical giant Pfizer. First approved by the FDA in 2006, this pill is intended to reduce users’ positive associations with smoking. It works by blocking in smokers’ brains the receptors that are stimulated by nicotine. It has been used by millions of people around the world as its popularity grows. In 2007, Chantix profits reached over $883 million.

Chantix lawsuits are on the riseReports indicate many users experiencing aggressive behavior and thoughts, including self harm and suicide, and lashing out at friends and family members when unprovoked. This has even occurred for people with no previous aggressive or violent behaviors. Pfizer has many lawsuits pending against it on the basis that the company did not disclose the risks of psychological side effects.

Study Documents Adverse Side Effects of Chantix

Chantix now leads the list of prescription drugs that are associated with acts of violence.  Results of a study published in PLoS ONE medical journal revealed that Chantix played a role in 408 cases of FDA reported adverse events. The second highest rate of incident was with the anti-depressant medication Paxil, with 177 cases. Not only are the reported rates of violence the highest, but the rates are proportionate to the number of people taking the medication.

Researchers speculate that the increased acts of violence are due to extra dopamine or serotonin released to the smoker’s brain while using the prescription medication, resulting in neuropsychiatric side effects. For people taking Chantix, the violent urges begin shortly after starting, and end quickly after discontinuing its use.

In 2009, manufacturers added to Chantix packaging a warning label depicting the potential hazards, including severe behavior changes and bouts of depression. Pfizer has also been required to do scientific trials on people with these symptoms to help determine their causes.

If you or someone you know has made the decision to quit smoking, talk about all your cessation options and strategies with your doctor.

Reference: “Chantix Side Effects Linked to More Violence Than Any Other Drug: Study”

WebQuit Nationwide Stop Smoking Study Offers Free Tools and Support

Would you like to quit smoking in the next 30 days?

Bloggers nationwide are sharing the news about a nationwide smoking cessation study being conducted by Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Fred Hutch (for short) is a world leader in cancer research, treatment, and prevention. This new program aims to improve the effectiveness of web-based smoking cessation programs.

The study will be quite powerful and important. Imagine cutting through all the stop smoking methods to find core programs and methods that offer the best results.

Smoking is the No 1 cause of preventable death in the United States. Also, people are turning to online programs to quit because the programs are inexpensive and convenient. Online stop smoking programs also give the person a way to get support without having to physically travel to support groups and offer privacy while trying to quit.

Because smoking addiction may be a little different for each person, tailoring a program to a person’s specific physical, emotional, and mental addictions and characteristics may help save thousands of lives each year.

Getting Free From CigarettesThe Fred Hutch study is seeking thousands of participants who want to be free of their habit! By joining the study a smoker could in turn offer information that may help others down the road.

Also those who join the study will receive many FREE perks! WebQuit offers interactive tools for dealing more effectively with smoking urges. Study members also receive step by-step guides for quitting smoking, personalized plans for quitting and remaining smoke-free, and even electronic links for reaching one-on-one expert help for quitting.

CiggyFree.com invites you to join, you could be free within 30 days!

Get started, buy visiting > WebQuit.com

Quit Smoking Right Now: Help Stop Smoking Program has 90% Success Rate

If you’re one of the 1.2 billion people still smoking (or someone you love is still smoking) you may be interested in the Quit Smoking Right Now program.

This quitting smoking program, created by author and internet entrepreneur Rick Beneteau, claims an amazing 90% success rate.

Beneteau states the 10% of people who do not successfully kick the nasty smoking habit is due to the fact they have not followed the steps as outlined in his program.

A 90% success rate is pretty impressive and warrants thorough investigation for anyone who’s serious about quitting smoking. This is a program to consider.

The Birth of Quit Smoking Right Now

Quit Smoking Right Now ProgramQuit Smoking Right Now came about after Rick Beneteau himself was battling a deadly smoking habit.

He tells his story on his web site, but in brief he’d tried multiple times to kick his 30+ year smoking habit with no success.

Motivated by his young daughter and pushed by fate Beneteau found himself face to face with Rick Sanura a NLP (neuro-linguistic practitioner) with a program for quitting smoking.

Beneteau began the program with Sanura and to his amazement quit smoking.

The two then collaborated to create the program they now offer to you; Quit Smoking Right Now.

How is Beneteau’s Program Different from Other Stop Smoking Programs?

The premise of Quit Smoking Right Now is that your mind is what convinced you to start smoking and ultimately your mind is the key to quitting smoking for good.

Not only will you quit smoking but you’ll accomplish it without nasty nicotine withdrawals or the use of nicotine replacement aids. Both of these are so common with many programs to stop smoking.

Once you re-program your mind through the techniques you’ll learn in Quit Smoking Right Now you’ll not only successfully quit smoking, you’ll never even be tempted to return to the nasty, life robbing habit even in times of extreme stress.

This program can be used successfully for cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, and pipe smoking.

What Do You Get When You Order?

With your $197.00 order of Quit Smoking Right Now you receive 3 downloadable audio or written files “Quit Smoking Right Now” to listen to or read plus a bonus of 3 audio files “Make Everyday a Great Day” to help you experience personal growth in any area of your life. You also have access to online support and telephone support along with a 30 day email subscription to “Pearls of Success.”

This program offers 100% money back guarantee if you don’t successfully quit smoking after following the specific steps outlined in the program.

Quit Smoking Right Now claims you will kick the habit after just three hours of listening to and following the steps outlined in this program.

Will it Work for You?

Cigarette Chemicals not Allowed in LandfillsThere are numerous testimonials from ex-smokers with heavy smoking habits on the Quit Smoking Right Now website.

Their claims are that this program did work successfully for them, where all others attempts to quit had failed. (If you order this program please stop back by and leave your comments of your results.)

Beneteau’s own personal experience tells the same story. Although this program costs more than most stop smoking programs it offers more support than most others do.

If you do smoke or love someone that still smokes learn more about this program and maybe you too can soon call yourself an ‘ex-smoker.’

To learn more, visit > Quit Smoking Right Now

Scripps Florida Scientists Find Blocking a Neuropeptide Receptor Decreases Nicotine Addiction

Findings could point towards more successful smoking cessation efforts.  The study was published in an online Early Edition issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the week of November 24. Scripps Florida is a division of The Scripps Research Institute.

The neuropeptide, hypocretin-1 (Orexin A), may initiate a key signaling cascade, a series of closely linked biochemical reactions, which maintains tobacco addiction in human smokers and could be a potential target for developing new smoking cessation treatments.

“Blocking hypocretin-1 receptors not only decreased the motivation to continue nicotine use in rats, it also abolished the stimulatory effects of nicotine on their brain reward circuitries,” said Paul Kenny, Ph.D., the Scripps Research scientist at Scripps Florida who led the study. “This suggests that hypocretin-1 may play a major role in driving tobacco use in smokers to want more nicotine. If we can find a way to effectively block this receptor, it could mean a novel way to help break people’s addiction to tobacco.”

Cigarette smoking is one of the largest preventable causes of death and disease in developed countries, and accounts for approximately 440,000 deaths and $160 billion in health-related costs annually in the United States alone. Despite years of health warnings concerning the well-known adverse consequences of tobacco smoking, only about ten percent of smokers who attempt to quit annually manage to remain smoke free after one year, highlighting the difficulty in quitting the smoking habit.

In the study, Kenny and a postdoctoral fellow in his laboratory, Jonathan Hollander, Ph.D., blocked the hypocretin-1 receptor using low doses of the selective antagonist SB-334867, a commercially available compound often used in research.

“While hypocretin 2 systems, otherwise known as orexin B, have been mainly implicated in regulating sleep,” Kenny said, “hypocretin 1, also known as orexin A, appears to be more involved in regulating motivated behavior. Our previous studies in close collaboration with other Scripps Research scientists have shown that hypocretin-1 receptors play a central role in regulating relapse to cocaine seeking. With that in mind, it seemed reasonable to test whether it was involved in nicotine reward as well.”

The new study indeed showed that blocking the receptor in rats significantly decreased nicotine self-administration and also the motivation to seek and obtain the drug. These findings suggest that hypocretin-1 receptors play a critical role maintaining nicotine-taking behavior in rats, and perhaps also in sustaining the tobacco habit in human smokers.In addition, the study highlighted the importance of hypocretin-1 receptors in a brain region called the insula, a walnut size part of the frontal lobe of the brain. A highly conserved brain region, all mammals have insula regions that sense the body’s internal physiological state and direct responses to maintain homeostasis. The insula has also been implicated in regulating feelings of craving. In a recent groundbreaking study, it was reported that smokers who sustained damage to the insula lost the desire to smoke, an insight that revealed the insula as a key brain region that sustains the tobacco habit in smokers. Until the new study, however, the neurobiological mechanisms through which the insula regulated the persistence of tobacco addiction remained unclear.

The new study sheds light on this question, showing that hypocretin-containing fibers project significantly to the insula, that hypocretin-1 receptors are expressed on the surface of neurons in the insula, and that blockade of hypocretin-1 receptors in the insula, but not in the adjacent somatosensory cortex region (which also records and relays sensory information), decreases nicotine self-administration. The effects of blocking hypecretin-1 receptors only in the insula, however, were less than blocking these receptors in the brain as a whole, suggesting that hypocretin transmission in other brain regions may also be playing a role in nicotine reward.

Working with scientists from Scripps Florida’s Translational Research Institute, Kenny and his colleagues are now searching for new antagonists at hypocretin-1 receptors that are less toxic than the compound used in the published experiments in the hopes of furthering the development of a human therapy.

###

In addition to Kenny and Hollander, authors of the paper, titled Insular Hypocretin Transmission Regulates Nicotine Reward, were Qun Lu, Michael D. Cameron and Theodore M. Kamenecka, also of Scripps Research.

The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Drug Abuse.

About The Scripps Research Institute

Picture of San DiegoThe Scripps Research Institute is one of the world’s largest independent, non-profit biomedical research organizations, at the forefront of basic biomedical science that seeks to comprehend the most fundamental processes of life. Scripps Research is internationally recognized for its discoveries in immunology, molecular and cellular biology, chemistry, neurosciences, autoimmune, cardiovascular, and infectious diseases, and synthetic vaccine development.

Established in its current configuration in 1961, it employs approximately 3,000 scientists, postdoctoral fellows, scientific and other technicians, doctoral degree graduate students, and administrative and technical support personnel. Scripps Research is headquartered in La Jolla, California. It also includes Scripps Florida, whose researchers focus on basic biomedical science, drug discovery, and technology development.

Scripps Florida is currently in the process of moving from temporary facilities to its permanent campus in Jupiter, Florida. Dedication ceremonies for the new campus will be held in February 2009.

Contact: Keith McKeown
Scripps Research Institute

Hypnotherapy Makes Quitting Smoking Possible

The Great American Smokeout is scheduled for the third Thursday in November, which motivates me to share thoughts and observations about smoking cessation.

Over the years, I have helped many people to quit smoking using hypnotherapy as a valuable tool.

By the same token, there are people who would not quit, no matter what, the incorrigible or people who think they are so powerless.

After all, many medical professionals and the Surgeon General have blasted away that nicotine addiction is harder to overcome than heroin or cocaine. This probably reinforces what some people want to hear: “I would quit, but it is too hard.”

I will quote observations from medical people and then will share my personal observations with you.

Dr. Raul Rodriguez of Rivercrest Hospital, a psychiatrist and addictionologist, shared that nicotine addiction is a function of how many years spent smoking and the mental attitude of the person.

When asked whether or not smokers wanting to quit had to be admitted for detox, he denied the need, because nicotine addiction was not as severe, but he likes the patch, an anti-depressant or gum to help with the process of smoking cessation.

My esteemed colleague of the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis, Dr. Dabney Ewin, a clinical professor of psychiatry and surgery at Tulane Medical School and Louisiana State University Medical School, shared his viewpoints with me: “The word addiction has lost its meaning in the scientific community and it no longer refers to a bodily need for a particular chemical because it indiscriminately describes strong emotional desires such as addicted to chocolate, sports, computers, foreign oil.

“People who think of themselves as addicts have adopted a fixed idea that they are helpless to overcome the problem. Another of their fixed ideas is that smoking had/has social value as in being cool. Removing this fixed idea causes anxiety, because people believe they are violating this fixed idea. An interesting study of 12,000 smokers by Tindle (et al 2006) noted that people who smoke low nicotine cigarettes are more than 50 percent less likely to quit smoking than those who smoke regular cigarettes. That finding is incompatible with chemical addiction”

Ewin states, though, that next to adrenalin, nicotine is the strongest known stimulant drug, which leads me to my own personal observation as a mental health clinician.

My patients tell me that smoking relaxes them. Not so. What does relax them is the act of taking time out, – leaving the work setting temporarily for a smoke outside and socializing with fellow employees, sitting in the backyard watching the deer go by, enjoying a comfortable chair and watch TV. This is relaxing.

Unfortunately, these relaxing acts are paired with a cigarette and the cigarette gets the credit for relaxation.

I believe smoking is a strong psychological habit because people do it under mostly the same circumstances such as during their morning rituals, their morning cup of coffee, reading the paper, getting in the car, coming home from work to “relax,” when having to make an unpleasant phone call and other scenarios, where a “friend” is needed.

Often people do not even realize they are smoking. They light up on autopilot, often leaving the cigarette to burn itself out. Smokers can spend hours on an airplane without chemical dependency consequences. They may be cranky because they do not like to be told what they can or cannot do.

Change is difficult because smokers are afraid to quit, afraid that they may be miserable, hard to live with. Alcoholics increase dosage for the same effect, while smokers can cut down. If nicotine were to be so addictive, one would conclude that the patch, prescription medication and gum would work to help people quit smoking.

Many people came to see me because the above did not work for them and they confessed that they still smoked while on the patch leading to dangerous nicotine overload. I am sure it can help some people to quit, but my opinion is that people swallow something, stick on something or chew something, sit back and wait for something to happen in a passive manner.

I believe, and my past experience has shown, that this habit needs to be treated cognitively (the way people think about smoking), behaviorally (what people do) and emotionally (how people cope with their feelings of stress, anxiety, etc.)

Even so called incorrigible smokers with a three-pack-per-day habit have successfully quit with psychotherapy and hypnotherapy. People I have seen years ago, call and tell me so.

Not everyone quit successfully and they are not going to do that. Case in point the patient who had his voice box removed or the lung cancer patient, still smoking.

Stop Smoking Sign Therefore, do not let anyone tell you that you cannot quit. If it takes medication to make it easier for you to succeed along with proper therapy, this is your rightful choice. You will save money, be healthier, live longer and feel so proud of yourselves.

Evi Shaw is a psychotherapist and hypnotherapist in solo private practice. Evishaw@verizon.net.  San Angelo Standard Times.

Obama Forever Hooked on Nicotine?

Could our new president of the United States become a poster child for smoking cessation and the millions of Americans trying to quit?

Now that President Obama is in the White House the eye is one him to see if he will follow through with his promise to the first lady and deal with his nicotine addiction and quit smoking.

In a recent interview, he confessed he hasn’t smoked since he has been in office on the White House grounds. This leaves us to red between the lines and assume that he has had a cigarette elsewhere.

Picture of President Obama

With all the stress that a president is under and with his grounded demeanor, is Obama like many others addicted to cigarettes who suffer from the illusion that smoking soothes the effects of stress? This is indeed one of the most known excuses for nicotine dependency.

Read all about Obama’s smoking habit in The Oregonian

Pick Up a Free Quit Smoking Meter

Ciggyfree Favorite Quit Smoking Meters!

A helpful stop smoking aid can be found at a variety of locations.

Quit Smoking meters help you gauge your habit and provide encouragement to face the facts.

The list is a combination of tools for PC’s and Macs.

Check them out:

Let us know your experience working with the meters and which your find the most helpful.

ClockWith new smoking taxes coming, the cost of smoking is sure to increase so the smoking cost calculator can be handy to estimate what your habit will cost in the days to come.

We hope this tool provides greater motivation to quit smoking now! Also the QuitMeter provides great motivation because you can actually determine how much you are saving!

Smoking-Related Illnesses Come with Significant Costs

Nicotine dependence is the physical vulnerability to the chemical nicotine, which is potently addicting when delivered by various tobacco products.

Smoke from cigarettes, cigars and pipes contains thousands of chemicals, including nicotine.

Being addicted to tobacco brings a host of health problems related to the substances in tobacco smoke. These effects include damage to the lungs, heart and blood vessels.

According to the American Lung Association, smoking cost the United States over $193 billion in 2004, including $97 billion in lost productivity and $96 billion in direct health care expenditures, or an average of $4,260 per adult smoker.

Vintage Photo Girl SmokingWhen people inhale, they are ingesting a chemical parade that marches through the body’s vital organs. Mayo Clinic.com reviews the negative health effects throughout the body, including:

Lungs. Smoking is the cause of most cases of lung cancer. Smoking also is the primary cause of other lung problems, such as emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic bronchitis.

Heart and circulatory system. Smoking increases your risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. If people smoke more than 25 cigarettes daily, they have five times the risk of heart disease compared to someone who doesn’t smoke.

Cancer. Smoking is a major cause of cancer of the esophagus, larynx, throat (pharynx) and mouth and contributes to cancer of the bladder, pancreas, liver, kidney, cervix, stomach, colon and rectum, and some leukemias.

Appearance. The chemicals in tobacco smoke can dry and irritate the skin, as well as promote wrinkles. Smoking also yellows teeth, fingers and fingernails.

Fertility. Smoking increases the risk of infertility and miscarriage in women and the risk of impotence and infertility in men.

Senses. Smoking deadens the senses of taste and smell, so food isn’t as appetizing as it once was.For most people, smoking cessation is difficult. In fact, quitting smoking might be one of the most challenging things an individual ever does. A feature on MayoClinic.com explains why smoking cessation matters, what to expect and how to stick with it.

Rochester, MN (PRWEB) October 10, 2008 

About the Mayo Clinic Website

Launched in 1995 and visited more than 15 million times a month, this award-winning Web site offers health information, self-improvement and disease management tools to empower people to manage their health.

Produced by a team of Web professionals and medical experts, MayoClinic.com gives users access to the experience and knowledge of the more than 3,300 physicians and scientists of Mayo Clinic.

MayoClinic.com offers intuitive, easy-to-use tools such as “Symptom Checker” and “First-Aid Guide” for fast answers about health conditions ranging from common to complex; as well as an A-Z library of more than 850 diseases and conditions, in-depth sections on 24 common diseases and conditions, 16 healthy living areas including food and nutrition, recipes, fitness and weight control, videos, animations and features such as “Ask a Specialist” and “Drug Watch.”

Users can sign up for a free weekly e-newsletter called “Housecall” which provides the latest health information from Mayo Clinic.

For more information, visit > The MayoClinic.com – Nicotine dependence

Smoking Reversible?

Risk of death from tobacco related diseases or various forms of cancer declines dramatically five years after kicking the habit.

Women who quit smoking reduce their risk of dying from heart disease and tobacco-related cancers.

Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health analyzed data on 105,000 women over 24 years, taken from the Nurses’ Health Study, a long-term survey that began at Harvard in 1976.

Stacey Kenfield is lead author of the new report. She says the data show harm from smoking can be reversed over time to the level of a non-smoker. “For coronary heart disease for example, your risk declines to a non-smokers’ risk within 20 years. For all causes it declines at 20 years. For lung cancer it is after 30 years.”

Kenfield says scientists observed almost immediate benefits when the women kicked the habit. “We saw a 47 percent reduction in risk for coronary heart disease within the first five years [of quitting] and a 21 percent reduction in lung cancer death within the first five years.” Kenfield says the data also indicate that smoking is more dangerous the younger a woman is when she starts. “If you start before you are 17, you have a 21-fold higher risk than a non-smoker. But if you start after the age of 26 you only have a 9-fold higher risk of dying from lung cancer.”

Picture of Girl SmokingBased on that evidence, Kenfield recommends high schools offer more programs to help students quit. “If you would like to see the whole potential benefit from your cigarette cessation, you really need to quit as soon as possible.”

Tobacco is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. The World Health Organization attributed 5 million deaths to smoking in 2000. That number is expected to climb to 10 million tobacco-related deaths by 2030. Kenfield’s study is published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Source: Voice of America News