Tag Archives: nicotine addiction

Camel Brand Dissolvable Tobacco Products

Dissolvable Tobacco Products Especially Appealing to Kids

The consumer demand for cigarettes has been decreasing, and Big Tobacco companies are looking to fill these sales gaps with cigarette alternative products. This includes cigars, chew, snuff, and nicotine replacements.

As the dangers of second-hand smoke becomes more prevalent, most areas have in place smoking bans in public places.

Big Tobacco companies are seeking out new products to keep addicted smokers dependent on their habit. Wikipedia defines the newest nicotine delivery devices as dissolvable tobacco products.

Nicotine Alternatives

Dissolvable tobacco products carry a significant risk of nicotine addiction and even poisoning if consumed by kids or teens. Additionally, these products have similar cancer and heart disease risks as traditional tobacco products.

Flavored—to make them taste “less harsh”—as well as dissolvable, these products are made from “finely milled tobacco” and are ingested similar to breath mints.

FDA Concerns

Camel Brand Dissolvable Tobacco ProductsThe FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) has expressed its concern with these products to Big Tobacco companies R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. and Star Scientific Inc. Because the packaging is brightly colored, appearing like a candy product, and small enough to be easily concealed, the CTP questions the appeal of these products to kids and teens.

The CTP has asked both companies to provide research and marketing documentation on the perception people aged 26 years and younger have towards these products, the age of new users, and information on product misuse.

Tasty Nicotine?

Star Scientific Inc. manufactures the dissolvable tobacco products Ariva and Stonewall. These products, similar in appearance to breath mints, come in wintergreen, coffee, and tobacco flavors. A Star Scientific spokesperson points out that these products provide adult users a tobacco alternative, but are not made to be attractive for non-users.

R.J. Reynolds Inc. produces Camel Orbs (tablets), Camel Strips, and Camel Sticks (toothpick style), all available in mint flavor. A spokesperson for the company stated that not only are their products strictly market to and designed for adults, but they carry the same warnings and age restrictions as other tobacco products.

Camel Orbs are currently being test marketed in Columbus, Ohio, Portland, Oregon, and Indianapolis, Ind.

To learn more: Dissolvable Tobacco Products

Reference: http://www.cigarettesflavours.com/smoking-campaign/fda-dissolvable-tobacco-appeals-to-kids/

The Health Consequences of Smokeless Tobacco

Spit is a common tobacco product used amongst young people and athletes. Often flavored, these smokeless tobacco products are viewed as both tasty and appealing.

But the health consequences associated with this product are serious—just as serious as dangers associated with cigarettes.

It is imperative that people recognize these consequences.

What is Smokeless Tobacco?

Smokeless tobacco is often called spit tobacco because it is used in the mouth. Spit consists of tobacco, nicotine, sweeteners for flavor, abrasives, salts, and many other chemicals.

One form of spit tobacco is chew, a leafy form of the substance. Another is snuff, a powdery ground tobacco that can be sniffed or chewed.

One of the appealing elements of smokeless tobacco is the added flavors, including mint, licorice, or cherry flavors. Because of this, young children are attracted to this product, and some start using it as early as nine or ten years old.

Smokeless tobacco should never be perceived as a substitute for cigarettes. There are over 3,000 chemicals and 28 carcinogens found in spit tobacco. It is just as lethal to one’s health as inhaling a cigarette.

Consequences of Using Smokeless Tobacco

It is essential that people do not interpret the lack of smoke or the flavorful taste of spit as fun and harmless. There are several consequences to one’s health from using this product. Because there are over 3,000 chemicals found in smokeless tobacco, there are elevated risks of users developing throat or mouth cancer. Whitish sores may develop inside the mouth called leukoplakia.

Users’ heart rates are often elevated, as is their blood pressure, increasing their chances of suffering from a heart attack or stroke. The chemicals in the spit decrease the body’s circulation and oxygen levels, leading to increased lethargy and dizzy spells.

Smokeless tobacco contains nicotine, and nicotine is extremely addictive. An addicted body is one that only seeks to satisfy its addiction.

Furthermore, users have a higher risk of developing tooth and gum disease due to the nature of this product’s use.

Reference: Health Concerns: Smokeless Tobacco [http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/tobac-tabac/body-corps/smokeless-sansfumee-eng.php]

Resist Picking Up Another Cigarette

You’ve managed to stay off smokes for a day, a week, month or even a year. Well done!

You weren’t sure you were going to make it but here you are – smoke free!  It’s going favorably and you feel great!

Well, mostly. There’s one little problem. Every now and then, things happen that make you feel like having a cigarette.

Smoking Temptations

For instance, as often happens, you’re with a group of friends or colleagues who, one by one, start lighting up. You’re the odd one out. One of them offers you a cigarette. You graciously thank her and remind her you’ve quit for good.

She tells you one cigarette won’t hurt. You persist. The others join in chiding and taunting you.

At other times – and this one’s a real stinker – out of the blue, you develop this sudden, sickening feeling – like there’s deep empty void within you. It feels like the only thing that could fill this gaping hole is by having a cigarette.

Contrary to what you’ve heard, read or even personally experienced in a previous quit attempt (am I kidding?!), quitting cigarettes doesn’t have to be too difficult. Quitting’s easier when you have the right mindset. It also doesn’t hurt to have a personal set of effective tools handy.

Half of All Smokers

Take the example above, where friends and colleagues offer you cigarettes even though they know you’ve quit. They tease and taunt you. Hey – it still happens to me too!  And I’m fine with it.

Despite their outward appearance of enjoying their smokes, about half of all smokers in the United States try to quit every year (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention figures). No doubt health concerns are high on their agenda.

Another good reason for quitting is that it’s just so tedious being addicted to cigarettes!  Smokers are as good as shackled to their packets of cigarettes for years and decades. They need to carry their packets of cigarettes with them everywhere they go.

At the back of their minds is the constant worry they’ll run out, so they’re constantly checking to ensure they’ll have enough until their next purchase.

And all this is not so much because of their love for cigarettes. It’s because of their addiction. Because of their tobacco addiction, smokers need to maintain the nicotine level in their blood at or above a personal threshold. If they’re not able to smoke, the nicotine is cleared from their system and the nicotine level in their blood drops.

They start feeling increasingly uncomfortable. They may find themselves unable to stay focused. It may spoil their mood. They need to smoke just to feel normal.

Smoking Rationalization

Most smokers have tried quitting several times but failed. They try to comfort themselves by rationalizing their addiction (“I smoke light cigarettes and they’re less harmful”). Others procrastinate quitting again and again. Some smokers feel trapped by their cigarette addiction.

This is the saddest lot. Even though, deep down, they’d rather quit, they’ve tried so many times and failed. Giving up they’re resigned to carry on smoking the rest of their lives, even if it kills them.

But Not YOU!

Luckily we’re not talking about you here – you’ve not smoked in days, months or years.

You got yourself out of that hole. Always be happy and grateful you got yourself over your cigarette addiction. Think of all the trouble you’re going to have to go through if you fall back in again by lighting up another cigarette.

Just stay Positively Quit!

Cheers 
Cas

Read a review of > Cassius Cheong’s Positively Quit! Manual
Learn Why Positively Quit! Manual has 13 Five Star Reviews

Herbal Stop Smoking Aid – Using Homeopathic Medicines to Quit Smoking

We all know the dangers of smoking, even the dangers associated with second smoke are well documented.

With this alarming information constantly etched into the mind why then, do smokers continue to smoke?

And even more important, is there a safe, sure fire way for them to quit?

Coming into recent attention are the use of homeopathic medicines (herbs) to ease the difficult withdrawal symptoms that keep many smokers from trying to stop and drives many smokers who are attempting quitting back to smoking.

Click to check out > Smoke Deter Natural Stop Smoking Aid

In the Face of Withdrawal Symptoms Many Smokers Pick Up Again

The withdrawal symptoms associated with ending this powerful addiction are headache, nausea, nervousness and irritability, food cravings, cough, shortness of breath, aches and pains, cold sweats, and more.

No wonder the smoker is reluctant to try to stop. But the trade off for not quitting is a continued spiral of adverse health effects that are far worse than the temporary and uncomfortable symptoms of withdrawal.

Discovering the Theory of Homeopathic Medicine

For years homeopathic doctors have used certain herbs to treat these uncomfortable symptoms separately with success.

Derived from the Greek words “homoios” meaning similar and “pathos” meaning disease or suffering, homeopathic medicine employs the use of plants, minerals, and animals to illicit the same symptoms the ‘sick’ person is experiencing.

Although this may sound strange it is logical and has been proven over centuries to work.

The body’s symptoms caused from the sudden change are the body trying to restore itself to homeostasis or balance. Therefore, encouraging and even evoking those symptoms enables the body to find that balance and heal.

Common Homeopathic Medicines and Nicotine Withdrawal Symptoms

Some of the common homeopathic medicines used to treat the symptoms associated with withdrawal from nicotine addiction are:

  • Black Spruce
  • Monkshood
  • Oates
  • Poison Nut

These traditional homeopathic medicines treat not only the physical symptoms of cough, shortness of breath, and food cravings but also the emotional and mental symptoms of withdrawal like nervousness and irritability too.

Smoke Deter Homeopathic Quit Smoking ProductThe benefit of using a natural, homeopathic aid to ease withdrawal symptoms instead of common over the counter and prescription aides is that the OTC treatments continue to supply the body with dangerous, addictive nicotine. The homeopathic medicines allow the smoker to successfully work through the period of withdrawal until they have ceased without the continued assault of toxic elements.

It is important to understand that if you choose the patch, gum, or other nicotine products you’re only extending the withdrawal period from nicotine.

Homeopathic medicines let you face the withdrawal symptoms head on and win!

Smoke Deter Battles Withdrawal Symptoms with Homeopathic Medicines

There is a liquid spray, “Smoke Deter” that utilizes the homeopathic medicines mentioned earlier in one product to ease the withdrawal symptoms associated with quitting smoking and enable the smoker to quit for good.

This product comes in a spray that is used in the mouth that delivers the all natural medicines quickly and safely by sublingual application.

The medicines are absorbed by the blood vessels under the tongue and quickly delivered to the body to stop the symptoms.

Smoke Deter uses Monkshood, Oat, Ignatia Amara, and Poison Nut to aid with the mental and emotional withdrawal symptoms like stress, nervousness, mental hysteria, and the physical symptoms induced by stress.

It also contains Black Spruce, Monkshood, Arsenicum Iodatum, Lung (Pulmo-porcine,) Plantago Major, Quibracho, Stricta Pulomaria (Lung Wort), and Tabacum to treat the physical symptoms like shortness of breath, nausea, cravings, aches and pains, headaches, cough and cold like symptoms, and lung and bronchial inflammation.

Smoke Deter has been proven to work by its many users whose testimonials give credence to this all natural products ability to help the smoker battling to quit to win the battle over withdrawal symptoms and finally become a non-smoker.

You can easily learn more about this unique product which is getting excellent reviews.

Click to check out > Smoke Deter Natural Stop Smoking Aid

Smoke Deter Works

For those of you who have used this program, please share your comments on how the Smoke Deter Homeopathic Stop Smoking Aid helped you.

Nicotine Addiction Linked to Studies on Autism

American researchers have recently discovered a connection between two proteins in the brain, linking nicotine addiction and autism.

According to a study presented at a Society for Neuroscience meeting, there is a physical and functional association between these two conditions.

The study showed that the neurexin-1 beta proteins, which are a part of the brain’s chemical communication system, are related to a certain type of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and play an important role in the proper formation and maturation of synapses.  Proper synapse function is critical to the central nervous system’s ability to connect and control other body systems.

Little Girl with AutismPrevious studies had reported that while such nicotinic receptors are absent in the brain of autistic patients, there are quite a few number of these receptors in the brain of addicts.

Findings revealed that nicotine increases the neurexin-1 levels in the brain of smokers, bringing more nicotinic receptors to the synapses and making them more efficient.

Scientists believe drugs used to curb nicotine addiction can also be effective in alleviating autism symptoms.

Source: PKH/HGH, PressTV

Obama Forever Hooked on Nicotine?

Could our new president of the United States become a poster child for smoking cessation and the millions of Americans trying to quit?

Now that President Obama is in the White House the eye is one him to see if he will follow through with his promise to the first lady and deal with his nicotine addiction and quit smoking.

In a recent interview, he confessed he hasn’t smoked since he has been in office on the White House grounds. This leaves us to red between the lines and assume that he has had a cigarette elsewhere.

Picture of President Obama

With all the stress that a president is under and with his grounded demeanor, is Obama like many others addicted to cigarettes who suffer from the illusion that smoking soothes the effects of stress? This is indeed one of the most known excuses for nicotine dependency.

Read all about Obama’s smoking habit in The Oregonian

Critical Genetic Link Found Between Human Taste Differences and Nicotine Dependence

University of Virginia Health System researchers found that two interacting genes related to bitter taste sensitivity play an important role in a person’s development of nicotine dependence and smoking behavior.

People with higher taste sensitivity aren’t as likely to become dependent on nicotine as people with decreased taste sensitivity, the researchers discovered.

Newswise — Could an aversion to bitter substances or an overall heightened sense of taste help protect some people from becoming addicted to nicotine? That’s what researchers at UVA have found using an innovative new method they’ve developed to analyze the interactions of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Their findings one day may be key in identifying people at risk for nicotine dependence.

In a study published in the October 10, 2008 issue of The American Journal of Human Genetics, University of Virginia Health System researchers report that two interacting genes related to bitter taste sensitivity, TAS2R16 and TAS2R38, play an important role in a person’s development of nicotine dependence and smoking behavior.

Researchers found that people with higher taste sensitivity aren’t as likely to become dependent on nicotine as people with decreased taste sensitivity.

“This new knowledge is an important tool in predicting whether a person is likely to become a smoker or not,” says lead investigator Ming Li, Ph.D., professor of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences who specializes in addiction and genetics research.

It’s long been known that a person’s ability to taste bitter substances plays a crucial role in the rejection of potentially toxic foods, but taste sensitivity varies widely among individuals and between ethnic groups.

Previous studies have suggested a link between so-called taster status and nicotine dependence, but genetic evidence underlying such a link has been lacking.

“Until now, the method for analyzing gene to gene or gene to environment interactions could only handle one type of trait without correcting for other important covariants, such as age or gender, but we’ve developed a novel algorithm and corresponding computer program that can handle all types of genetic data and correct for any number of variants – gender, age, race, and so on,” explains Dr. Li, who with his team studied genetic data of more than 2,000 participants from more than 600 families of African American or European American origin.

“This new approach significantly expands our ability to study gene-gene or gene-environmental interactions. It provides a far better analytical tool for every scientist out there doing genetics work,” says Dr. Li.

Taste Buds on the Tongue“We’re laying an important foundation for addressing nicotine dependence. First we need to establish a comprehensive understanding of how all associated genes work together to affect smoking behaviors and addiction; that’s what we’re doing now. Once we have that base of knowledge, we can move on to develop effective prevention and treatment for nicotine dependence.”

Source:  University of Virginia Health System

Smoking-Related Illnesses Come with Significant Costs

Nicotine dependence is the physical vulnerability to the chemical nicotine, which is potently addicting when delivered by various tobacco products.

Smoke from cigarettes, cigars and pipes contains thousands of chemicals, including nicotine.

Being addicted to tobacco brings a host of health problems related to the substances in tobacco smoke. These effects include damage to the lungs, heart and blood vessels.

According to the American Lung Association, smoking cost the United States over $193 billion in 2004, including $97 billion in lost productivity and $96 billion in direct health care expenditures, or an average of $4,260 per adult smoker.

Vintage Photo Girl SmokingWhen people inhale, they are ingesting a chemical parade that marches through the body’s vital organs. Mayo Clinic.com reviews the negative health effects throughout the body, including:

Lungs. Smoking is the cause of most cases of lung cancer. Smoking also is the primary cause of other lung problems, such as emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic bronchitis.

Heart and circulatory system. Smoking increases your risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. If people smoke more than 25 cigarettes daily, they have five times the risk of heart disease compared to someone who doesn’t smoke.

Cancer. Smoking is a major cause of cancer of the esophagus, larynx, throat (pharynx) and mouth and contributes to cancer of the bladder, pancreas, liver, kidney, cervix, stomach, colon and rectum, and some leukemias.

Appearance. The chemicals in tobacco smoke can dry and irritate the skin, as well as promote wrinkles. Smoking also yellows teeth, fingers and fingernails.

Fertility. Smoking increases the risk of infertility and miscarriage in women and the risk of impotence and infertility in men.

Senses. Smoking deadens the senses of taste and smell, so food isn’t as appetizing as it once was.For most people, smoking cessation is difficult. In fact, quitting smoking might be one of the most challenging things an individual ever does. A feature on MayoClinic.com explains why smoking cessation matters, what to expect and how to stick with it.

Rochester, MN (PRWEB) October 10, 2008 

About the Mayo Clinic Website

Launched in 1995 and visited more than 15 million times a month, this award-winning Web site offers health information, self-improvement and disease management tools to empower people to manage their health.

Produced by a team of Web professionals and medical experts, MayoClinic.com gives users access to the experience and knowledge of the more than 3,300 physicians and scientists of Mayo Clinic.

MayoClinic.com offers intuitive, easy-to-use tools such as “Symptom Checker” and “First-Aid Guide” for fast answers about health conditions ranging from common to complex; as well as an A-Z library of more than 850 diseases and conditions, in-depth sections on 24 common diseases and conditions, 16 healthy living areas including food and nutrition, recipes, fitness and weight control, videos, animations and features such as “Ask a Specialist” and “Drug Watch.”

Users can sign up for a free weekly e-newsletter called “Housecall” which provides the latest health information from Mayo Clinic.

For more information, visit > The MayoClinic.com – Nicotine dependence

Researchers Discover Why Some Smokers Addicted with First Cigarette

Addicted to smoking from your first puff?

Blame it on a chemical pathway in your brain.

Researchers at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry have discovered differences in brains that explain why some individuals become addicted to tobacco with their first cigarette while others are initially sickened by the experience.

It comes down to one brain pathway that uses dopamine, a neurotransmitter, to transmit signals related to the rewarding properties of nicotine.

Working with animals, the University of Western Ontario scientists found they were able to manipulate specific dopamine receptors in the brain to control whether nicotine was rewarding or aversive.

The work was published today in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Lead researcher Steven Laviolette of the department of anatomy and cell biology at Schulich said the finding may open the door to drugs to prevent smoking and reverse addiction.

“If we can develop pharmacological agents that target those receptors in these specific areas, we might have a very effective way of controlling or even preventing someone from becoming dependent and addicted to nicotine simply by blocking the rewarding effects or controlling how their brain perceives nicotine as a rewarding stimulant,” Laviolette said.

It might also be possible to block the pain of withdrawal smokers feel when they stop smoking, making it easier for some to quit, he said.

Laviolette said the UWO research may apply to other addictive drugs that use the same neurotransmitter such as alcohol, cocaine, amphetamines and barbiturates.

Causes for Cigarette AddictionThe next step for the scientists will be to look at chronic nicotine exposure and see if it might be possible to reverse the effects of the addiction.

“After someone becomes addicted there is a whole cascade of events that happen that we haven’t necessarily addressed at this point but we are certainly looking at in future studies, Laviolette said.

Source: John Miner, Sun Media

For the latest local coverage, read The London Free Press on the web or in print.

One Million Deaths by Tobacco in India!

Video of a study of smoking statistics in India.

Shocking to learn how many individuals, actually one in twenty, will die from tobacco addiction.

Smoking one to seven cigarettes a day takes years of your life. India has ten times more deaths than in more developed countries.

The only strategy to change this situation is to get smokers to stop, however tobacco control is difficult.