Tag Archives: lung health

Many Cigarettes

Another Reason to Quit

The American Heart Association states that “smoking is the most preventable cause of premature death in the United States.” Are you a smoker? Is someone you love a smoker? It’s a highly addictive habit that can be difficult to break, but it is not impossible.

Reasons Why You Should Quit Smoking

A smoking habit doubles the chance of a heart attack and increases the chance of stroke. Quitting smoking can mean a decrease in risk of developing certain cancers, such as lung, mouth, throat or bladder.

Smoking destroys the body with each puff of harmful chemicals, including tar. Every cigarette smoked damages the lungs. The cilia, or the small hairs on the lungs, are destroyed and become unable to protect and remove harmful particles and toxins. Over time, with each cigarette, the lungs become more and more polluted and discoloured from tar.

Quitting smoking can save your life.

A Demonstration of What 30 Packs of Cigarettes Does to your Body

If you are a smoker who is struggling to quit, or if you know a smoker and want to help them quit, take a look at this video. The visual analogy is startling. Keep in mind this is what 30 packs of cigarettes leaves behind. Can you imagine what a ten year, or twenty year smoking habit leaves behind in the body?

Video Demonstrates How Smoking Destroys Your Lungs

Lung cancer accounts for approximately one third of cancer deaths in the American population.

Over $10 billion is spent annually on the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer.

The majority of people with this disease are smokers, but former smokers and people exposed to secondhand smoke are still at risk.

What Smoking Does to Your Lungs

Smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke causes the invasion of over 4,000 chemicals into the lungs through the mouth and nose. These chemicals are deposited as tar in the lungs, sticking to the cilia. The function of the “hair-like” cilia is to keep the airways and lungs clean. When covered with tar, the cilia dies off. Germs and dirt do not get cleaned out and there is an accumulation of mucous. “Smoker’s Cough” is attributed to dead cilia. When dirty mucous clogs the airways and blocks the inhalation and exhalation of breath, a person’s reaction is to cough.

Long Term Effects of Smoking on the Lungs

Smoking destroys the body in many ways. A few of the long term consequences to the lungs caused by smoking and continued exposure to secondhand smoke includes:

  • emphysema
  • cancer
  • bronchitis
  • asthma
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

To see the difference in functioning between healthy lungs and tumor-covered lungs, watch the following video:

Quick At Home Lung Test – Easy Way to Check Your Lung Function

This is a series of do at home lung tests you can do to test the strength of your lungs.

They are very simple and just take a couple of minutes.

You may want to pass this information on to a all the smokers you know and see how well they do.

This simple test may get their attention and provide a nudge to help them quit smoking.

The Match Test

Light a match in a draft-free room, let it burn halfway, hold it 6 inches from your mouth, and try to blow it out with your mouth wide open. If you can’t, your lungs may not be in the best condition.

Measure Your Chest

Measure your chest at rest. Men should measure the chest around the nipples; women should measure just under the breasts.

Match TestTake a full breath and measure again while holding the breath. The second measurement should be at least 1.5 inches more than the first one. If your chest expands less than 1.5 inches with a deep breath, your lungs may be weak and you should see your doctor.

Time Your Exhalation

Take a deep breath, then time yourself while you exhale it as fast as possible. Time only the exhalation, not the inhalation. If it takes longer than 3 to 4 seconds to exhale, you may have a lung disorder and should see your doctor.

Source: Weiss RJ, Sharpe-Subak G, and the editors of Consumer Reports Books: The Columbia University School of Public Health 40+ Guide to Good Health. Yonkers, NY, Consumer Reports Books, 1993.

Smoking Cigarettes Effects on Lung Health

Every time you inhale smoke from a cigarette, you kill some of the alveoli, or the air sacks in your lungs.

These air sacks are where the oxygen that you breathe in is transferred into your blood.

The alveoli will not grow back.

So if you destroy them, you permanently have destroyed part of your lungs.

Alveoli Lung Air Sacks ImageSmoking paralyzes the cilia that line your lungs.

Cilia are little hair like structures that move back and forth to sweep particles out of your lungs. When you smoke, the cilia can not move and can not do their job.

So dust, pollen, and other things that you inhale they sit in your lungs and build up.

Also, there are a lot of particles in smoke that get into your lungs. Since your cilia are paralyzed because of the smoke and can not clean them out, the particles sit in your lungs and form tar.

Keep Your Lungs Healthy!

Your lungs are complex organs, but what they do is take a gas that your body needs to get rid of (carbon dioxide) and exchange it for a gas that your body can use (oxygen).

In this edition of How Stuff Works, we will take a close look at how your lungs work and how they keep your body’s cells supplied with oxygen and get rid of the carbon dioxide waste.

We will explain some of the conditions and diseases that make breathing harder and cause the lungs to fail.

We will also explain why you can’t hold your breath for a long time and why you cough or hiccup.

To learn more, visit > How Stuff Works: Lungs

Smoker’s Lung Pathology

Picture of LungsCigarette smoking is associated with a wide variety of abnormalities throughout the body that cause not only illness, but also, all too often, death.

Indeed, if all deaths from diseases related to smoking (lung disease, heart disease, and cancers of many different organs) were considered, a case could be made for cigarette smoking as the leading cause of death in industrialized countries.

Ironically, it is also the most preventable cause of death in our society!

Updated Lung reports

They’ve been minimized and they’ve been marginalized, but the fact is holistic therapies–including acupuncture, homeopathy, massage therapy, aromatherapy, yoga, nutrition therapy, and dozens more–have been gaining greater mainstream acceptance.

According to a 1993 survey published in the New England Journal of Medicine, in 1991, about 21 million Americans made 425 million visits to practitioners of these types of alternative medicine; that’s more than the estimated 388 million visits we made to all primary care physicians that year.

Now a holistic approach where an individual’s situation and particular way of coping is addressed–and going cold turkey may not be necessary–is slowly beginning to influence the way people with addictions are treated. Holistic therapies are helping to bridge the gap between conventional, exclusively abstinence-oriented approaches and the newer, more controversial harm-reduction philosophy.

When addressing an addiction, all holistic techniques begin with the same basic philosophy: people develop addictions to correct an “imbalance” within them. Addicts become stuck, unaware, and unable to deal with their thoughts, feelings, and actions.

They may drink, take drugs, or eat to excess to disassociate from their deficiency. Holistic therapies work to restore balance by connecting mind and body. They take away some of the underlying causes of abuse by helping people become aware of and take responsibility for the way they think, feel, and act.