Tag Archives: lung cancer

Cigarettes Broken up

Need More Reasons to Stop Smoking?

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), lung cancer accounts for about 30% of cancer deaths per year in the United States. The majority of lung cancer cases result from smoking.

Men who smoke are 23% more likely than male nonsmokers to develop lung cancer, and women smokers are 13% more likely than female nonsmokers to develop lung cancer. More than half of lung cancer cases are in former smokers, and 15% are in those who have never smoked.

Smoking also leads to cardiovascular disease, which remains the number one killer in the United States. Diseases associated with smoking include atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), heart failure, high blood pressure, and even stroke.

Carbon Monoxide & Nicotine

Cigarettes Broken upSmoking increases the level of carbon monoxide in the blood. Increased carbon monoxide levels in the blood slows transportation of oxygen throughout the body by 5 to 15%. Low levels of oxygen through the body leads to heart disease.

Nicotine is an alkaloid that works upon the brain’s nerve centers that regulate the heart and breathing functions. Causing the small blood vessels to constrict, this lessens the vessels elasticity, increase heart problems, and increases blood vessel disease.

Carcinogens

Constant smoking results in a build up of carcinogens, the cancer producing agents found in tar and tobacco smoke. Carcinogens are deposited in the bronchial tubes that lead to the lungs. From the bronchial tubes, the carcinogens move into the air tubes of the lungs where the cells are attacked and mutated into cancerous cells: lung cancer.

Video Demonstrates How Smoking Destroys Your Lungs

Lung cancer accounts for approximately one third of cancer deaths in the American population.

Over $10 billion is spent annually on the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer.

The majority of people with this disease are smokers, but former smokers and people exposed to secondhand smoke are still at risk.

What Smoking Does to Your Lungs

Smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke causes the invasion of over 4,000 chemicals into the lungs through the mouth and nose. These chemicals are deposited as tar in the lungs, sticking to the cilia. The function of the “hair-like” cilia is to keep the airways and lungs clean. When covered with tar, the cilia dies off. Germs and dirt do not get cleaned out and there is an accumulation of mucous. “Smoker’s Cough” is attributed to dead cilia. When dirty mucous clogs the airways and blocks the inhalation and exhalation of breath, a person’s reaction is to cough.

Long Term Effects of Smoking on the Lungs

Smoking destroys the body in many ways. A few of the long term consequences to the lungs caused by smoking and continued exposure to secondhand smoke includes:

  • emphysema
  • cancer
  • bronchitis
  • asthma
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

To see the difference in functioning between healthy lungs and tumor-covered lungs, watch the following video:

Molly Wears a Hat

Why Molly Wears a Hat: She Started Smoking at 15, Developed Cancer by 30

Molly is a 30 year old mother who was working and going to school when she was diagnosed with large cell lung cancer.

As a smoker for half her life, Molly was faced with a terrifying and painful disease that could have been prevented.

Quitting smoking was a no-brainer for Molly. She says she could “smoke and die, or breathe and live.”

Smoking Habit Formed Early

Molly was a teenager when she started smoking. In the beginning, it was a social activity she’d do with her friends: someone would steal cigarettes from a parent or older sibling, and they’d sneak off to the park to smoke them.

Smoking was also a normal part of Molly’s family growing up. Many relatives on both sides of her family smoked. So, frequently being around smokers and smoking, she tended to see it as a normal activity.

Molly’s Advice to Kids & Teens

“Don’t do it!” are Molly’s words of wisdom to teenagers who are feeling pressured to smoke or are thinking about starting the lethal habit. She points out, using herself as an example, it is an activity that slowly kills yourself.

Vowing to live life to the fullest, Molly reminds people, “Don’t take anything for granted. Life is way too short.”

Listen to Molly’s Story

When Mama Wore a Hat

Book Cover for When Mama Wore a HatBecause she didn’t want to scare them, it took Molly a while to be brave enough to tell her kids that she had cancer. When she did, Molly used the illustrated children’s book When Mama Wore a Hat by Eleanor Schick (Wyeth) to help explain what was happening.

Schick, an esteemed children’s author and illustrator, wrote When Mama Wore a Hat, suitable for four to eight year olds, in order to help them understand illness.

To learn more about this book click > When Mama Wore a Hat by Eleanor Schick

On Average 10 Year Decrease in Life Expectancy for Smokers

If you are a smoker who just doesn’t want to quit, then you are subjecting yourself to a shorter life span than average.

By continuing to smoke, you have a greater chance of losing 10 years off your life, time that could be spent with your loved ones.

You also subject yourself to a general decline in health during those last years of your life while you are afflicted with one or several health complications as a result from smoking. These are health struggles that you also subject your loved ones to witness. Is it worth it?

What Quitting Smoking Can Do For You

Now that you know that a long-term smoker, on average, has a life expectancy of about 10 years less than a non-smoker, it is time to seek support and help to stop smoking now.

If you have smoked since your teen years or young adulthood, your chances of reversing any damage is significant. By stopping before the age of 35, you greatly improve your risk of any damage compared to people who have never smoked.

If you choose to stop smoking prior to the age of 50, the risk of dying from smoking-related diseases decreases by fifty percent. You can decrease that even further by making better health, nutrition, and diet choices.

Not Quitting Can Kill You

Quitting smoking not only dramatically improves your overall life expectancy, but it can improve your general well-being and overall health. No matter what your age or how long you’ve been smoking, it’s never too late to quit.

If you are hard-headed and need greater evidence on the decrease in life expectancy of smokers, take a look at this very long list of celebrities whose shortened life spans were caused from smoking tobacco.

As you can see, so many talented individuals died much earlier than the average life expectancy. And those who lived until their 80s struggled through many years of health afflictions—such as heart attack, emphysema, lung cancer, and throat cancer—due to their dangerous addiction to smoking.

Celebrity or not, no smoker is immune from smoking-related illnesses or even death.

Click for >  Celebrities Who Died From Smoking Related Illness

Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis at Increased Risk of Lung Cancer

Reuters Health Report

Recently researchers found a link between the risk of lung cancer and rheumatoid arthritis.

The article reported that the risk of lung cancer is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, even after taking into account the effects of tobacco and asbestos exposure, according to a case-control study in US military veterans.

Using a Veterans Health Administration database, Dr. Ritu Khurana, at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, and fellow researchers obtained medical records for approximately 480,000 patients treated between 1998 and 2004, including 7280 diagnosed with lung cancer and 8678 diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis.

The incidence of rheumatoid arthritis was 3.4% among lung cancer patients and 1.8% among controls, the investigators report in the Journal of Rheumatology for September.

After controlling for age, gender, tobacco and asbestos exposure, patients with rheumatoid arthritis were at significantly greater risk for lung cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 1.43).

The association grew stronger with age, Dr. Khurana’s group reports.

The authors note that a recent concern over the potential risks associated with anti-TNF therapy were not relevant to this population during a period when such therapy was not widely available.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Link to Lung CancerIn a related editorial, Dr. Henrik Kallberg, of Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, makes the point that “it is not clear…whether the increased risk of developing cancer is due to coexisting risk factors such as smoking, to rheumatoid arthritis disease itself, to rheumatoid arthritis treatment, or simply to earlier detection of cancer because of intense medical surveillance.”

Source: J Rheumatol 2008;35:1695-1696,1704-1708.

Big Tobacco Companies Covered Up Radiation Dangers From Smoking

Tobacco companies have covered up for 40 years the fact that cigarette smoke contains a dangerous radioactive substance that exposes heavy smokers to the radiation equivalent of having 300 chest X-rays a year.

Internal company records reveal that cigarette manufacturers knew that tobacco contained polonium-210 but avoided drawing public attention to the fact for fear of “waking a sleeping giant”.

Polonium-210 emits alpha radiation estimated to cause about 11,700 lung cancer deaths each year worldwide. Russian dissident and writer Alexander Litvinenko died after being poisoned with polonium-210 in 2006.

The polonium-210 in tobacco plants comes from high-phosphate fertilisers used on crops. The fertiliser is manufactured from rocks that contain radioisotopes such as polonium-210 (PO-210).
The radioactive substance is absorbed through the plant’s roots and deposited on its leaves. 

People who smoke one-and-a-half packets of cigarettes a day are exposed to as much radiation as they would receive from 300 chest X-rays a year, according to research.

New health warning labels such as “Cigarettes are a major source of radiation exposure” have been urged by the authors of a study published in this month’s American Journal of Public Health. 

“This wording would capitalise on public concern over radiation exposure and increase the impact of cigarette warning labels,” the Mayo Clinic and Stanford University authors say.

Quit Victoria executive director Fiona Sharkie said Australian tobacco companies were not legally obliged to reveal the levels of chemicals contained in cigarettes. This made it difficult to know exactly how damaging PO-210 was and meant it was impossible to know what effect it had on other poisons contained in cigarettes.

“It (PO-210) is obviously highly toxic and we applaud any efforts to publicise the dangers,” she said. “But the industry needs to be better regulated before we can support specific warnings.” 

Inhalation tests have shown that PO-210 is a cause of lung cancer in animals. It has also been estimated to be responsible for 1% of all US lung cancers, or 1600 deaths a year.

The US authors analysed 1500 internal tobacco company documents, finding that tobacco companies conducted scientific studies on removing polonium-210 from cigarettes but were unable to do so.  “Documents show that the major transnational cigarette manufacturers managed the potential public relations problem of PO-210 in cigarettes by avoiding any public attention to the issue.”

Second Hand Smoke Laces the AirPhilip Morris even decided not to publish internal research on polonium-210 which was more favourable to the tobacco industry than previous studies for fear of heightening public awareness of PO-210.

Urging his boss not to publish the results, one scientist wrote: “It has the potential of waking a sleeping giant.” Tobacco company lawyers played a key role in suppressing information about the research to protect the companies from litigation.

The journal authors, led by Monique Muggli, of the nicotine research program at the Mayo Clinic, say: “The internal debate, carried on for the better part of a decade, involved most cigarette manufacturers and pitted tobacco researchers against tobacco lawyers. The lawyers prevailed.

“Internal Philip Morris documents suggest that as long as the company could avoid having knowledge of biologically significant levels of PO-210 in its products, it could ignore PO-210 as a possible cause of lung cancer.”

Source: William Birnbauer, Theage.com.au

Antioxidants May Protect Smokers from Lung Cancer

Healthnotes Newswire Article Reports

Smoking generates free radicals in the body, causing cell damage that can sometimes lead to cancer.

A study found that smokers might protect themselves from developing lung cancer by eating foods that are rich in antioxidants called flavonoids.

Quit Smoking Now — The Best Bet for Better Health

Smoking increases the risk for several cancers and heart disease, in addition to causing emphysema and other chronic airway diseases.

People who quit smoking lower their chances of developing these diseases and can actually repair some of the damage that smoking has caused.

If quitting smoking proves an insurmountable task, though, there are some things that smokers can do that may help protect them from the effects of cigarette smoke.

Flavonoids—Nature’s Cancer Fighters

Flavonoids are plant-derived compounds that are capable of scavenging free radicals in the body.

Studies have shown that flavonoids have anticancer properties, but most of these trials have used amounts of flavonoids much higher than those typically found in the diet.

The new study, published in the journal Cancer, aimed to determine if flavonoids could protect against lung cancer in smokers and nonsmokers, by comparing the amount and types of flavonoids eaten by 558 people with lung cancer and 837 healthy people.

Smokers who ate more of certain flavonoids called catechin, epicatechin, quercetin, and kaempferol, as well as more vegetables, tea, and wine were less likely to develop lung cancer than smokers who ate less of these flavonoids and foods.

Surprisingly, the protective effect of these foods and flavonoids was not seen among nonsmokers. “These results may reflect the finding that these flavonoid compounds are strong antioxidants against free radicals generated by tobacco smoking,” said the authors.

green teaDr. Lise Alschuler, author of Alternative Medicine Magazine’s Definitive Guide to Cancer, 2nd Edition: An Integrative Approach to Prevention, Treatment, and Healing, commented, “These findings underscore the significant anticancer properties of flavonoids. Even a relatively small amount of dietary flavonoids exerted significant effects. This effect was most obvious in smokers likely due to the fact that smokers are typically severely depleted in antioxidants and have high exposure to cancer-causing chemicals.”

So where do you find lung-healthy flavonoids?

Benefits of Green and Black Tea

  • Epicatechin and catechin are plentiful in green and black teas, with lesser amounts in chocolate, grapes, and apricots. To boost the flavonoid power of tea, add lemon juice before drinking.
  • The main sources of quercetin and kaempferol are apples and red onions.

(Cancer 2008;112:2241–8)

Source:  Kimberly Beauchamp, ND, Healthnotes

Susan DeWitt – This Video Will Break Your Heart…

Please quit smoking while you still have the choice.

Watch this musical tribute of Susan DeWitt’s struggle with cancer caused from smoking.

This will touch your heart, and offer great motivation for anyone wanting to quit.

The video points out smoking statistics and touching moments that make you think twice about lighting up:

Recent Smoking Study: Tropical Mushroom Extract Fights Cancer

An April press release from Cancer Research UK reports that an extract of the mushroom Phellinus linteus has been found to halt the growth of breast cancer cells in vitro.

Previous studies have also shown the species to be effective against prostate, skin, and lung cancer cells, but up until now nobody knew how it worked.

Researchers at Methodist Research Institute in Indianapolis appear to have shed some light on this problem.

With the conclusion of their latest study, a team led by Dr. Daniel Sliva found evidence that the extract augments the action of an enzyme known as AKT, which controls cell and blood vessel growth vital to the survival of cancer cells. The study was published in the British Journal of Cancer.

Phellinus linteus, which is commonly called Mesima in the West, has been used for centuries in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and other ancient systems of medicine. This study is exciting because it finally brings us to an understanding of why the mushroom works — prerequisite knowledge in order to conduct clinical research in modern Western medicine.The study involved observing breast cancer cells exhibiting different levels of invasiveness as they interacted with different concentrations of the extract. The extract was found to suppress growth of the cells under all conditions. Greater concentrations of extract for longer periods of time yielded the best results, and less invasive cells were more easily suppressed.

Overall, the results were encouraging. “We saw a number of positive results from our investigation on aggressive human breast cancer cells, including a lower rate of uncontrolled growth of new cancer cells, suppression of their aggressive behaviour and the formation of fewer blood vessels that feed cancer cells essential nutrients,” explained Dr. Sliva.

Tropical Mushroom Treats Cancer SymptomsThe researchers believe that dietary supplements containing the extract could help ward off potential cancers, and the research could eventually lead to the development of new drugs. “…We’re excited that we can begin to explain how this ancient medicine works by acting on specific molecules. We hope our study will encourage more researchers to explore the use of medicinal mushrooms for the treatment of cancer,” Sliva said.

Both the research team and Cancer Research UK, which publishes the British Journal of Cancer, maintain that further research is needed on humans and animals before any definite conclusions can be drawn.

About the author: Adam Miller is a student of life who has dedicated literally thousands of hours of personal research on top of formal institutional training in Dietetics to learn the secrets of achieving vibrant health and extended lifespan. His passion and dedication is in bringing the best ideas for self-empowerment through nutrition and nutraceuticals as well as alternative therapies, technology, and information to the public through various means.

Source: Naturalnews.com
http://www.naturalnews.com/023255.html

Smoking Reversible?

Risk of death from tobacco related diseases or various forms of cancer declines dramatically five years after kicking the habit.

Women who quit smoking reduce their risk of dying from heart disease and tobacco-related cancers.

Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health analyzed data on 105,000 women over 24 years, taken from the Nurses’ Health Study, a long-term survey that began at Harvard in 1976.

Stacey Kenfield is lead author of the new report. She says the data show harm from smoking can be reversed over time to the level of a non-smoker. “For coronary heart disease for example, your risk declines to a non-smokers’ risk within 20 years. For all causes it declines at 20 years. For lung cancer it is after 30 years.”

Kenfield says scientists observed almost immediate benefits when the women kicked the habit. “We saw a 47 percent reduction in risk for coronary heart disease within the first five years [of quitting] and a 21 percent reduction in lung cancer death within the first five years.” Kenfield says the data also indicate that smoking is more dangerous the younger a woman is when she starts. “If you start before you are 17, you have a 21-fold higher risk than a non-smoker. But if you start after the age of 26 you only have a 9-fold higher risk of dying from lung cancer.”

Picture of Girl SmokingBased on that evidence, Kenfield recommends high schools offer more programs to help students quit. “If you would like to see the whole potential benefit from your cigarette cessation, you really need to quit as soon as possible.”

Tobacco is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. The World Health Organization attributed 5 million deaths to smoking in 2000. That number is expected to climb to 10 million tobacco-related deaths by 2030. Kenfield’s study is published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Source: Voice of America News