Tag Archives: anti-smoking

SC Horry County Schools

Smoke Free Horry Education and Resource Center

Students in the Digital Art and Design program at the Academy for Technology and Academics in Myrtle Beach have helped create a marketing campaign aimed at educating others students about the dangers of smoking.

The Smoke Free Horry Eduction and Resource Center opened in Myrtle Beach Mall as a resource center where students can help counsel other students with a tobacco-free lifestyle.

Statistics note that 240,000 South Carolina students are exposed to second hand smoke each year. 103,000 of these kids will likely die prematurely as a result of this exposure. Each year, 6,300 South Carolina children under the age of 18 become smokers themselves.

Students Taking a Smoke-Free Stand

Horry County Schools is one of the only districts in the country with a 100% tobacco-free policy. The Smoke Free Horry Eduction and Resource Center features educational and promotional material designed by students. This project has been both a valuable learning process for the students as they have learned to create an entire campaign from idea stage to completion, as well as an effective peer-to-peer method of spreading information.

SC Horry County SchoolsIn addition to the informative brochures and unique displays featuring facts and statistics about smoking and its harmful effects, the Digital Art and Design students have created a game, designed tee shirts, and even offer backpacks and yo-yos as part of their promotional campaign spreading the smoke-free message.

Spreading the No-Tobacco Message

Students working on the Smoke Free Horry campaign have travelled to various schools to help spread their message. Teachers, school administrators, and others who have partnered with this group are impressed with the entire process and look forward to seeing the positive outcome of such an innovative campaign.

Horry County Schools hopes that through youth risk surveys administered year to year, students’ answers regarding tobacco issues will indicate the peer-to-peer informational campaign is working.

Reference: http://www.thesunnews.com/2011/09/21/2402086/smoke-free-center-to-open-with.html

Since 1878 Reports Confirmed Smoking Was a Health Hazard

1878: Eighty-six years before the U.S. surgeon general issues a report confirming the dangers of smoking tobacco, a letter from English physician Charles R. Drysdale condemning its use appears in The Times of London.

Drysdale, the senior physician to the Metropolitan Free Hospital in London, had already published a book on this subject titled Tobacco and the Diseases It Produces, when he wrote the letter that described smoking as “the most evident of all the retrograde influences of our time.”

Drysdale had been on an anti-smoking crusade since at least 1864, the year he published a study documenting the effects on young men of consuming ¾ ounce of tobacco daily. That study reported cases of jaundice, and at least one subject having “most distressing palpitations of the heart.”

Drysdale’s book pinpointed nicotine as the dangerous agent and reported its ill effects on the lungs, circulation system, even the skin.

Havana-cut tobacco contained roughly 2 percent nicotine, while Virginia tobacco was a more toxic 7 percent, Drysdale pointed out. (Tobacco was a product of the New World and had to be imported to Europe.)

He also warned against exposure to second-hand smoke: “Women who wait in public bar-rooms and smoking-saloons, though not themselves smoking, cannot avoid the poisoning caused by inhaling smoke continually. Surely gallantry, if not common honesty, should suggest the practical inference from this fact.”

The prolific Drysdale wrote on a variety of other related subjects as well, including medicine as a profession for women and issues related to population control.

Despite Drysdale’s warnings, and despite the establishment of numerous anti-smoking movements, little was done to curb smoking anywhere in the world.

Though physicians and scientists understood there were numerous health hazards associated with the practice, the number of smokers increased dramatically in the first half of the 20th century. Thank you, Madison Avenue. Thank you, Hollywood.

The turning point probably came in 1957, when then-Surgeon General Leroy Burney reported a causal link between smoking and lung cancer. It was left to Burney’s successor, Luther Terry, to lower the boom.

Under Terry’s direction, a special committee produced Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General.

This 1964 bombshell — so volatile that it was released on a Saturday to minimize the effect on the stock market — began a massive change in people’s attitudes toward smoking.

And to think it only took 86 years.