Tag Archives: cigarette addiction

Link Between Smoking and AMD (Age-Related Macular Degeneration)

The link between smoking and AMD (age-related macular degeneration) is now as robust as the link between smoking and lung cancer, yet few people are aware of the link or even of AMD.

AMD is the UK’s leading cause of sight loss – there are around 500,000 people in the UK with AMD – and an estimated 54,000 people have the condition as a result of smoking.

Pauline Edwards, 50, from Salford, has AMD after smoking most of her adult life.

EyesPauline said: “I smoked for years. Now I have AMD, am partially sighted in one eye and am likely to go blind.

When you smoke you cannot imagine what it is like to have lung cancer and especially when you are young the risk of dying earlier doesn’t come into it.

I am a nurse, I saw people die from smoking-related diseases and that did not make me kick the habit. But if I had been told that I could lose my sight because of smoking I would have given up. I stopped the day I found out.”

Steve Winyard, RNIB’s Head of Campaigns and Chairman of AMD Alliance UK, said: “Smoking is the only proven cause of AMD that people can do anything about yet people are not aware of the link and most people have not even heard of the condition.

The message is simple: do not take up smoking and if you do – stop!

People also need to make sure they have regular eye tests to check their eyes are healthy – an eye test can save your sight.”RNIB is calling on the Government to introduce specific warnings on cigarette packets and to fund a major public awareness campaign on the dangers of smoking to your eyesight. RNIB is also joining the British Medical Association and the Royal College of Ophthalmologists in calling for a ban on smoking in all enclosed public places and workplaces across the UK.”

Did you know…

The benefits of quitting smoking are very real.

Studies have shown that people who stopped smoking 20 years ago have a similar risk of developing AMD as non-smokers do and the risk starts to decrease after ten years of not smoking.

Simon Kelly, Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon at the Bolton Eye Unit and co-author of the report published today, would also like to see warnings on cigarette packets. He said: “Knowledge of the link between smoking and AMD is very low but evidence from Australia and New Zealand shows that raising awareness of this link creates a powerful message for the general public.

A survey amongst patients in Bolton also published today suggests that fear of blindness is as compelling as fear of lung cancer and heart disease as a motivator to quit. In my clinical experience when people are diagnosed with AMD and learn of the link with smoking they are often sufficiently shocked and motivated to want to stop smoking straight away.”

Source RNIB, Royal National Institute of Blind People

Click to learn more about > AMD

Cigarette Ingredients and Composition

Cigarettes look deceptively simple, consisting of paper tubes containing chopped up tobacco leaf, usually with a filter at the mouth end.

In fact, they are highly engineered products, designed to deliver a steady dose of nicotine.

Cigarette tobacco is blended from two main leaf varieties: yellowish ‘bright’, also known as Virginia where it was originally grown, contains 2.5-3% nicotine; and ‘burley’ tobacco which has higher nicotine content (3.5-4%).

US blends also contain up to 10% of imported ‘oriental’ tobacco which is aromatic but relatively low (less than 2%) in nicotine.

In addition to the leaf blend, cigarettes contain ‘fillers’ which are made from the stems and other bits of tobacco, which would otherwise be waste products. These are mixed with water and various flavorings and additives. The ratio of filler varies among brands.

For example, high filler content makes a less dense cigarette with a slightly lower tar delivery. Additives are used to make tobacco products more acceptable to the consumer.

They include humectants (moisturizers) to prolong shelf life; sugars to make the smoke seem milder and easier to inhale; and flavorings such as chocolate and vanilla. While some of these may appear to be quite harmless in their natural form they may be toxic in combination with other substances.

Also when the 600 permitted additives are burned, new products of combustion are formed and these may be toxic.

The nicotine and tar delivery can also be modified by the type of paper used in the cigarette. Using more porous paper will let more air into the cigarette, diluting the smoke and (in theory) reducing the amount of tar and nicotine reaching the smoker’s lungs.

Filters are made of cellulose acetate and trap some of the tar and smoke particles from the inhaled smoke. Filters also cool the smoke slightly, making it easier to inhale. They were added to cigarettes in the 1950s, in response to the first reports that smoking was hazardous to health. Tobacco companies claimed that their filtered brands had lower tar than others and encouraged consumers to believe that they were safer.

Tobacco smoke is made up of “sidestream smoke” from the burning tip of the cigarette and “mainstream smoke” from the filter or mouth end.

Tobacco smoke contains thousands of different chemicals which are released into the air as particles and gases.

Many toxins are present in higher concentrations in sidestream smoke than in mainstream smoke and, typically, nearly 85% of the smoke in a room results from sidestream smoke.

The particulate phase includes nicotine, “tar” (itself composed of many chemicals), benzene and benzo(a)pyrene. The gas phase includes carbon monoxide, ammonia, dimethylnitrosamine, formaldehyde, hydrogen cyanide and acrolein. Some of these have marked irritant properties and some 60, including benzo(a)pyrene and dimethylnitrosamine, have been shown to cause cancer.

One study has established the link between smoking and lung cancer at the cellular level. It found that a substance in the tar of cigarettes, benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE), damages DNA in a key tumour suppresser gene.

What is Cigarette Tar?

“Tar”, also known as total particulate matter, is inhaled when the smoker draws on a lighted cigarette. In its condensate form, tar is the sticky brown substance (filled with chemicals) which can stain smokers’ fingers and teeth yellow-brown. All cigarettes produce tar but the brands differ in amounts.

The average tar yield of cigarettes has declined from about 30mg per cigarette in the period 1955 to 61 to 11mg today. There have also been reductions in nicotine (from an average of about 2mg in 1955, 61 to about 0.9mg by 1996). Until January 1992, information about tar yields of cigarettes was given in a general fashion on cigarette packets and advertisements as a result of a voluntary agreement between the tobacco industry and the Government.

Due to labeling (Safety) regulations requirements for health warnings on tobacco, cigarette packets must include a statement of both the tar and the nicotine yield per cigarette on the packet itself. The same figures are printed on cigarette advertising, along with the health warning, as part of a voluntary agreement between the industry and health regulators.

Following the discovery in the 1950s that it was the tar in tobacco smoke which was associated with the increased risk of lung cancer, tobacco companies, with the approval of successive governments, embarked on a program to gradually reduce the tar levels in cigarettes.

Although there is a moderate reduction in lung cancer risk associated with lower tar cigarettes, research suggests that the assumed health advantages of switching to lower tar may be largely offset by the tendency of smokers to compensate for the reduction in nicotine (cigarettes lower in tar also tend to be lower in nicotine) by smoking more or inhaling more deeply.

Also, a study by the American Cancer Society found that the use of filtered, lower tar cigarettes may be the cause of adenocarcinoma, a particular kind of lung cancer. There is no evidence that switching to lower tar cigarettes reduces coronary heart disease risk.

Cigarette IngredientsNicotine, an alkaloid, is an extremely powerful drug. The Royal College of Physicians in England and the Surgeon General in USA have affirmed that the way in which nicotine causes addiction is similar to drugs such as heroin and cocaine.

Only 60mg of pure nicotine (contained in two packs of cigarettes) placed on a person’s tongue would kill within minutes.

Nicotine is contained in the moisture of the tobacco leaf: when the cigarette is lit, it evaporates, attaching itself to minute droplets in the tobacco smoke inhaled by the smoker. It is absorbed by the body very quickly, reaching the brain within 7-15 seconds.

It stimulates the central nervous system, increasing the heart beat rate and blood pressure, leading to the heart needing more oxygen. Carbon Monoxide, the main poisonous gas in car exhausts, is present in all cigarette smoke. It binds to haemoglobin much more readily than oxygen, thus causing the blood to carry less oxygen.

Heavy smokers may have the oxygen carrying power of their blood cut by as much as 15%.

Source: Emirates Hospital, Dubai – U.A.E

~CiggyBot

— *~ When fate closes a door go in through a window~*

No Smoke With This Man’s Fire

AS THESE things go, “I’m going to cure the world of smoking” is up there with the world’s best catchphrases.

These words were uttered by Allen Carr on July 15, 1983, the day when he stubbed out his last cigarette.

Convinced he had discovered a method based mainly on the logical reasons smokers need to quit (rather than on the sea of drugs and patches and gums and hypnotists on the market), he would soon coin it Easyway, which would heal millions of their nicotine dependency.

Carr’s second wife Joyce had heard it all before, the muggy reek on his clothes continued evidence of the 100-a-day routine he’d cultivated throughout his working life. That day, she witnessed him have such a fierce coughing fit that a heavy nosebleed ensued.

Traumatized by the event, Carr’s first instinct was to light up. The bleeding intensified. Appalled, Joyce demanded he visit a hypnotherapist who had helped a family friend.

Dubious, but willing to placate his wife, Carr went along and had his eyes opened, not by the treatment but by one statement from the therapist: “Do you realize smoking is just nicotine addiction and if you quit for long enough, you will eventually be free?”

Many variations on this mantra are repeated in Carr’s books and by the ex-smoker therapists who work in his clinics, helping keep the success rate around the 95% mark they proudly boast.

I met Joe Bergin, the man who runs Easyway Scotland, in an Edinburgh cafe two weeks before visiting his group clinic at Ellersly House Hotel in Murrayfield. I realise our 90-minute interview was, for the most part, effectively a mini-session, all the analogies and arguments and persistent talk of “illusions of benefit” and “the smoking trap” all crop up in Carr’s books and the five-hour long therapy sessions. Fair enough, as Bergin describes the Easyway method as his “favorite subject”.

The feeling which smokers are really after, he says, is the natural relaxed state of the non-smoker, believing they can get there only by feeding the nicotine addiction. The craving arises from the feeling when their last nicotine rush starts to leave the system. So, why not just let the rush leave and allow the body eventually to move into this naturally relaxed state? Carr and his captains’ simplest analogy is you wouldn’t wear a pair of tight shoes simply to feel the relief when you take them off.

On the day of the session, Kate Moss has been accused in the press of being a tobacco industry puppet, only too happy to appear in public and before the cameras with an inevitable wet tab hanging from her lips. Bergin tells me while the industry has seemingly taken a hit from the advertising ban, they are still able to pour an estimated £100m a year into various marketing techniques: “The last resort of the movie-maker is to go to a tobacco company and as long as someone is smoking in the movie, that’s fine.”

It’s not about taste. They would smoke camel dung if they could.

As they enter the room where the clinic is being held, it’s immediately obvious to the wannabe non-smokers they have come to the right place. A funeral pyre of cigarette packets and lighters (the God Bless America and Cyprus holiday lighters are Bergin’s favorites) is positioned near the door, a constant reminder as they head outside for a puff during the “comfort breaks” of the filth they are inserting into the body. The atmosphere is quiet as the group gathers. “It’s like a dentist’s waiting room,” notes Bergin. “You’d think I was taking you to the cemetery rather than leading you away from it.”

Sitting on chairs but encouraged to curl up on the floor if they wish, the collective comprises five men and four women, from vocations as varied as the record industry and homeopathy. Bergin promises “no hoopla, no fancy aids or gimmicks” but there is a white board, graphs, a trick-of-the-eye picture of Marilyn Monroe and a fake needle which he produces to simulate a junkie injecting. Later, there is a brief interlude for an eyes-closed relaxation segment. Scribbling on the white board all the standard reasons why and when people smoke (boredom, relaxation, courage, for concentration, to stay slim, with a drink, on the phone) he discounts each one by applying the Easy way tenets.

“It’s not about the taste. A smoker would smoke camel dung if they could.” And after four and a bit hours, the ritual of the last cigarette sends the group out into the cold.

At the end of the session, Bergin asks the group how they feel: “Frightened but confident”, “the worry is staying stopped” and “the penny will drop when I sit down and have a drink tonight” are among the replies. If the statistics are true, only one of this group will be lured back into the smoking trap; but even they will have the opportunity of attending later booster classes after which, if they are still hooked, they’ll be refunded the 220 fee paid for the initial session.

The success-rate statistics are certainly remarkable, particularly considering the outcome of Scotland’s high-profile smoking ban, which came into force in March last year. It’s probably too early to measure fully its impact but figures from Imperial Tobacco show tobacco sales fell by about 5% at the time of the ban. Sales continue to be down by 2% to 3%. A study of bar staff carried out by Dundee University showed an improvement in their respiratory health within two months of the ban. But evidence of long-term cessation is patchy.

And as impressive as Easyway’s statistics are, the method doesn’t work for everyone. Four years ago, 33-year-old IT consultant Katie attended the clinic and booster sessions but has been on and off smoking ever since. “I think the booster sessions are a bit more aggressive because obviously they don’t really want to be holding them; for the therapist, it’s like facing their rejections.

“Things happened in it that annoyed me. I was told I only smoked because it was cool. That didn’t really help.”

Katie is a couple of months into her current quit and insists she is holding out with will-power, a real no-no concept as far as Easyway is concerned.

A fortnight on from the session, I ring 37-year-old events manager Terri who had also previously tried Easyway but is convinced this time around the method will stick.

“I was concerned because I was going out a couple of days after the session for a big rugby night out. But I was pleased with myself because I didn’t even think about smoking at the time. The session made me recognize I wasn’t really missing out on anything.”

After the session, I asked Bergin why he used “we” instead of “you” so much. “You shouldn’t use you’, it’s too accusative.

“I use the we’ because we the smokers’ are brainwashed and even non-smokers have been brainwashed into believing there’s some kind of pleasure in it.”

A few minutes before the session started, I visited the toilet, and a fuzzy version of I Will Survive forces its way out of the hidden speaker system. Coincidence? I think so.

# Burning Ambition: The Inspiring Story of One Man’s Quest to Cure the World of Smoking has just been published by Penguin, priced  1.99.

Easyway Scotland: 0131 449 7858 or see www.easyway scotland. co.uk

By BRIAN DONALDSON, The Herald
Original Publication Date: March 13 2007
Reproduced with the permission of The Herald, Glasgow © Newsquest (Herald & Times) Ltd.

For the Record

In case I’ve misled anybody in any of my posts… I do not disdain the patch.

I quit using the patch. I used it as directed, for all 3 levels. I’ve been quit 1 Year, 2 Months, 1 Week, 13 hours, 3 minutes and 59 seconds.

Thanks to the patch, somewhere in the world there are 4,746 cigarettes that were not smoked by me. I don’t see anything wrong with quitting CT if you can do it.

I don’t see anything wrong with any method now available legally in this country. If you find a way that works for you – use it.

As for me, I owe my monetary savings of $1,307.78 and “life” savings of 1 Month, 5 Days, 6 hours and 6 minutes to the strength the patch gave me.

I have never intended in any way to say quitting by means of the patch is bad. I will say that nicotine is a powerful, mind-numbing drug. I’ll shout that part from the rooftops. And I’ll also go so far as to say that nicotine is a powerfully addictive drug at that.

But quitting by means of the patch is, in my opinion, the best thing that has happened to me health-wise since my children were born.

~GareK

The Tie That Binds

If there is a chain to be broken, then there must be links or ties that hold that chain together.

My last two days in Texas with my daughter, I had a startling revelation. It’ll seem so simple to you, as you sit here and read it.

But it was a “No DUH!” moment for me and I don’t mind showing how blind a person can be when they’re emotionally invested in helping somebody quit.

I had taken each of my daughters individually to my hotel during my visit and showed them a video in hopes to get them to see what smoking can and will do to their lives.

I then showed them a pic of Barb in the last few days of her life, and encouraged them to read more by searching the internet for information on her widower and daughter.

Girl In Distress PictureMy youngest quit immediately, and has been smoke-free for three weeks now. My middle girl, who just gave birth to another daughter, told us something exciting two nights before I flew home. She said she’s going to quit — she wants to quit — and here’s the part that opened my eyes…she ended with “…but I’m scared!”

I told you it wouldn’t sound like much. But to me, it was a real wake up call. I smoked for thirty years. Twenty-five of those years or more, I wanted to quit…but I was scared to.

Well, if I’d been scared enough to continue smoking for a quarter of a century, what makes me think anybody else would be any different? LOL!

I realized that what I’d been trying to do was use logic. That’s okay for an unaddicted mind-set. But it isn’t much of a weapon against fear. Fear is such a debilitating emotion.

It causes people to accept abuse in a relationship, even if it kills them, because they’re afraid to try breaking away. It causes people all kinds of grief and miscommunication. And it causes junkie-thinking to be more powerful than logic.

I personify my addiction by giving it the character of “Nicodemon”, not because I think there’s an actual demon inside me but because the addicted mind is so extremely insidious. The best example of that is how the addicted mind, or Nicodemon, uses fear to enslave us.

Now, here’s the neat thing. My middle daughter revealed how she was afraid to quit, and both my youngest daughter and I piped in with “Oh I know, I was too! But it really isn’t as bad as you fear it will be!”

We were so excited to relay that to her, and we babbled on like junior high kids, talking about how we’d braced ourselves for this horrible pain and long term suffering…only to find that we’ve collectively experienced only about forty-five minutes of “hard craving” in all this time.

That’s with me quit for 1 year and 8 weeks, and her quit for 3 weeks…45 minutes of difficult is nothing compared to dying at the age of 41 and leaving your loved ones behind!

The stark reality of the consequences of smoking have got to be more clear and much more persistent than your fear of walking away from smoking. Talk to people who have quit, especially serial quitters, and they will tell you — each quit is different.

Almost every single Quit Keeper I’ve ever talked with state that they have had at least one easy quit, and it was usually one of the first ones. My first quit is my forever quit. I won’t go back. I was blessed with a very, very kind quit, and so was my daughter.

We both know how lucky we are, not only to have had an easy time of it, but simply to have found a way to overcome our fear of trying. If you’re reading this and you have not gotten to that point yet — please, do some research. You’ll learn the same things I did – it isn’t as bad as you think it will be.

Your addicted mind is keeping you enslaved. Fear is the tie that binds most people to their addiction. Those who face their fears usually find that the horrors they feared were so far removed from the reality as to be embarrassing.

How can I have been so afraid of this to have continued to smoke for a quarter century when I really really didn’t want to!?!

Take your life back now, and stare down your fears. Untie those fears that bind you to your addiction. Believe me, it is worth it to be free.

Will the Cycle Be Broken

…be unbroken…

Oh how I pray it will be broken!

To understand my meaning, you need to know a little about me. Who I am, where I am, why I am here.

I’m a 50-something grandmother who finally found a way to overcome this addiction a year and 8 weeks ago.

Growing up, it wasn’t a question of if you would start smoking, but when. The same was true for my mom. I have a picture of her when she was maybe 15 or 16 eating an apple and smoking a sickarette.

She smoked when she was pregnant with me. So when I took my first puff of a sickarette, even though it didn’t taste good and I had to make my body accept the smoke into my lungs…it felt like home.

It had been part of my experience before I ever had a choice in what kinds of things I wanted to experience. My mom smoked around us kids all the time we were growing up, as did our dad and step dad and just about every “cool” person in our world.

Woman SittingMom died when I was 10-ish. She’d been in the hospital for 3 and a half years, and weighed in at about 82 lbs when the cancer finally ended her suffering and claimed her life…

I grew up in foster homes a very confused and emotionally devastated person. Eventually I had kids of my own, and like my mother I smoked while I was pregnant and I smoked around my kids.

Like her, I also became a single mom and, like her, I allowed people to smoke around my kids as a matter of course.

Today I’m in Texas. I’m here because my middle daughter has given birth to my 4th grandbaby. She’s a beautiful and, thankfully, healthy little girl – and she’ll probably smoke when she grows up. My daughter, like her mother, and her mother before her, smoked while she was pregnant.

I prayed so hard when we found out that she was pregnant that our daughter would emulate her big sister. At least my eldest found a way to quit while pregnant, even though she started smoking again after the baby was finished breast feeding. And she doesn’t allow anybody to smoke in the house or car, or in the presence of her children.

She keeps trying to quit… at least she knows it’s important to keep trying. But my middle daughter isn’t there yet. And I don’t know what to do to help her.

I showed both my middle and my youngest daughters the Barb Tarbox video – yes, it’s made a difference. The youngest, who is still single and not yet a mom, is quitting. She’s beginning Week 2 and is using the patch to give her the extra strength to ride out the craves. She’s doing well and I’m proud that she made this decision.

We had a lot of destructive cycles to end, a lot of “life lessons” to learn. I believe I’ve helped the girls learn enough to end the cycle of domestic abuse once and for all.

My mom got beat up a lot by her husbands. There’s no sense in that, and there isn’t a woman in the world who has to put up with that. I think the girls have learned that – their behavior says they have.

So how do I help them beat this addiction, and quit passing it along to the future generations in our family?

~Garek

How Your Lungs Work

You breathe in and out anywhere from 15 to 25 times per minute,

Without even thinking about it.

When you exercise, your breathing rate goes up — again, without you thinking about it.

You breathe so regularly that it is easy to take your lungs for granted.

You can’t even stop yourself from breathing if you try!

Smoker’s Lung Pathology Photo Essay

This photo essay will focus on smoker’s lung. The term “smoker’s lung” refers to the structural and functional abnormalities (diseases) in the lung caused by cigarette smoking.

First, the normal structure and function of the lung will be described and illustrated. Then, the structural and functional abnormalities caused by smoking. will be described and illustrated.

http://www.medicinenet.com/smokers_lung_pathology_photo_essay/article…

All About Smoking (ALA)

http://www.lungusa.org/site/pp.asp?c=dvLUK9O0E&b=22938

Contains the following topics of interest:

  • Smoking Fact Sheet
  • Data and Statistics
  • Secondhand Smoke Fact Sheet
  • Secondhand Smoke and Children Fact Sheet
  • Secondhand Smoke and Your Family
  • Cigar Smoking Fact Sheet
  • International Tobacco Use Fact Sheet
  • Smoking Among Older Adults Fact Sheet
  • Image Comparison of Healthy Lung to Lung with Emphysema
  • Smoking Policies in the Workplace Fact Sheet
  • Tobacco-Free Schools Fact Sheet
  • Tobacco Product Advertising and Promotion Fact Sheet

How Smoking Hurts Your Lungs

Smoking damages your lungs natural cleaning and repair system and traps cancer-causing chemicals in your lungs.

Picture of LungsSmoking destroys the tiny hairs (cilia), which line the upper airways and protect against infection. Normally, there is a thin layer of mucous and thousands of these cilia lining the insides of your breathing tubes.

The mucous traps the little bits of dirt and pollution you breathe in, and the cilia move together like a wave to push the dirt-filled mucous out of your lungs. Then you cough, swallow, or spit up the mucous, and the dirt is out of your lungs.

When your lungs’ natural cleaning and repair system is damaged, germs, dirt and chemicals from cigarette smoke stay inside your lungs. This puts you at risk for chronic cough, chest infections, lung cancer and COPD.

View a Bronchoscopy in a Patient with Lung Cancer

The patient is a 57 year old, with a 75 pack year history of smoking, who was found to have a carcinoma in the upper portion of his right lung.

“The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing.” ~ John Powell

Click to learn How the Lung’s Work at HowStuffWorks.com

Are Cigarettes Your Best Friend?

Occasionally I hear a smoker say that they cannot possibly give up smoking because a cigarette is their best friend.

Some friends can be highly toxic to your well-being, and a cigarette is one such friend to beware of!

There comes a time in life when we should take inventory of how we choose to spend our time.

Each step of the way life gets a bit closer to target death. We all know that we cannot live forever!

There is always one certainty in life and that is the knowledge that the ultimate end to every human being who lives is cessation of life.

Picture of Man With Gun SmokingDeath is our final frontier and we hold zero knowledge of what really happens when we arrive and cross over to this state titled death.

So why do people choose to entertain cigarettes as their best friend?

Don’t Miss The Mark!

Sometimes people just don’t get it.

They tend to think that they can continue on with life just as it is and not have to change anything about themselves.

They forget that life really is about change, and fail to witness the evidence as marked by the four seasons becoming their own worst enemy in the battle to quit smoking.

It’s easier to talk themselves into it. They fall into the trap they have set up for themselves.

They are their own enemy if they convince themselves that they just need:

    • One more puff
    • One more cigarette
    • One more pack
    • One more carton
    • One more week
    • One more month
    • One more year
    • One more decade

      They can continue hurting themselves for the rest of their natural lives and turn their time into something addictively insane during the interim.

      Picture of Word MarkThey mark their days as being an entirely productive experience while they suck on the other end of a toxic pesticide stick. And they do this every thirty to ninety minutes! Is this you? It was me 2.5 years ago.

      Hey Listen!

      Don’t miss the mark! Get off the butts and get busy with life. Only you can choose to be proactive, and live to breathe!

      Observe the four seasons closely:

      Spring is birth

      Summer is youth

      Fall touts middle age

      While Winter bleeds the elderly…

      Know your limitations.

      Everything in life is circular.

      What you do in your lifetime will eventually come back to bless or haunt you.

      Use your time on earth wisely.

      Don’t miss the mark!

      Be True To Your Quit

      During the Early Days (daze) staying quit seems out of reach, like if only you could just have that one puff it would, could, should set you free!

      Think before you reach.

      One puff could equal one to two packs for the next five, ten, or twenty years, or perhaps a lifetime of smoking.

      You have the power.

      Picture of EyesWill you choose to deny or comply?

      What will your choice be?

      Will you choose to be chained to addiction or opt to be free?