Tag Archives: withdrawal symptoms

Women Celebrating Smoke Free Lives

Smoke Free Women is an organization serving as a resource for women who are looking to quit smoking, as well as acting as a support system for women who have already quit.

Approximately one in five American women is a smoker. Almost 80% of them have a desire to quit.

Created by the Tobacco Control Research Branch of the National Cancer Institute, Smoke Free Women offers women and their friends and family help on achieving this goal.

Smoke Free Women: Help Quitting

Stubbed out CigaretteThe Smoke Free Women website offers many different quit-smoking resources, including:

  • an online cessation guide designed by health professionals and ex-smokers;
  • information database on various smoking related issues and quitting topics, such as the benefits of quitting, depression, pregnancy and smoking, second hand smoke, stress and weight concerns, and withdrawal symptoms;
  • various quizzes to help gauge mental status and interpersonal relationships;
  • information for numerous quit lines featuring health councilors and web resources; and
  • a publications library of information on quitting, pregnancy and smoking, smoking later in life, and more.

Celebrating Smoke Free Voices

To celebrate the one year anniversary of the creation of the Smoke Free Women website, the organization established a video contest. This inspiring contest was to provide a platform for people to creatively express themselves in self-made videos that were entered in one of two categories.

The first category was open for videos focusing on the topic “Why I am a smoke free women.” Entrants were encouraged to enter videos that explained why they stay smoke free, their reasons for quitting, and what it means to be a smoke free woman.

Video Winner: Why I am a Smoke Free Woman

The second category was the topic “Why I want YOU to be smoke free,” giving friends or relatives of smokers an opportunity to share why they wanted a loved one to be smoke free.

Video Winner: Why I Want You to be Smoke Free

Smoke Free Women has helped women from across the country with their smoking cessation needs, and the videos of success from these women are truly inspirational.

Reference:  Smoke Free Women [http://women.smokefree.gov]

Allen Carr’s Easy Way

I went on an Allen Carr course to stop smoking some weeks ago.

I knew it would work and it did.

It may sound strange to you but I knew it would work because it had worked for me nearly three years ago when I went on the same course.

That day I sat in a room with about fifteen other people. We spent five hours listening to a very nice lady talk to us about smoking. There was no mumbo jumbo, no strange stuff, no scare tactics, just what seemed like a normal presentation about smoking, and we smoked throughout it.

Then, at the end I had my last cigarette. I walked out of there and didn’t smoke for over two years, not a drag, not a puff. In a weak moment a few months ago I succumbed and, within a matter of weeks, I was back on twenty a day. I decided almost immediately that I didn’t want to be a smoker again and that I’d go back on another Allen Carr clinic to stop.

Allen Carr's Book Cover Allen Carr – [By Blogger Rhythmic Diaspora] – This post is not to persuade you to stop smoking, particularly if you don’t smoke. It’s not to advertise my chosen method of stopping either. It’s merely to pass on a thing that I got from it, a powerful thing, one that I know I’ll keep with me.

It goes like this. One of the key points to this method is about time frames. Often when people “give up” smoking, a term I use loosely, they count the minutes, the days, the weeks and, well you know the rest. I’ve done it before and I know of so many people who have taken the same approach. It the one where we set ourselves a target. We say “If I can last a week then I’ll be almost there”.

Then, after the week, we try to “last” a month, then a year and on we go. So ultimately we never feel as if we’ve stopped smoking. We just keep waiting for a magical moment at which we can declare ourselves to be a non-smoker. And that moment only arrives when we die, which may be a bit too long to wait for many of us. When we’re lying there on our death bed the last thing we’re going to be thinking of is getting a pat on the back from someone for not smoking all that time.

We were told that we should avoid this trap by changing our mindset. We should leave the course and have the mentality of a non smoker. Think and believe that we don’t smoke, rather than fretting about lasting a day or an hour without a fag.

It’s such a powerful way to think that I have applied it to other things in my life too. Target and objective setting are important aspects of my life, I rarely have a day in which I’m not aiming for something. But I also must enjoy the now, the moment. To do that I still work at achieving targets but I try to enjoy that work. If it’s drum practice then I treat it as a pleasure, which is pretty easy for me. I don’t have band practices that I don’t want to go to anymore. I make sure that I enjoy them.

For the record the stopping smoking clinic was on May 17th. There were no patches, no gum or no nicotine substitutes involved whatsoever. I had a couple of days in which I experienced some mild pangs of withdrawal symptoms. That was it. I left there as a non smoker.

I’m happy about that.