Tag Archives: tobacco related deaths

Surgeon General: Smoking Poses Greater Risks Than Originally Thought

The tobacco related news is buzzing this week with a critical new report from the Surgeon General on the dangers of smoking.

This report was shared on Friday, Jan 17th, 2013 and lists many more associated diseases including great concern for children’s health risks.

The report makes makes it clear that second hand smoke is just as dangerous as directly inhaling a cigarette.

Additional diseases added to the list effect all age groups: young, middle aged, and aging population:

  • Type 2 diabetes.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Erectile dysfunction.
  • Macular degeneration that can blind older adults.
  • Two additional types of cancers: liver and colorectal.

Number of Deaths Since 1964: 20.8 Million

The report also noted the number of deaths related to smoking since the very first Surgeon General Report published back in 1964. About 20.8 million people in the U.S. have died from smoking-related diseases since then. That is staggering yet not surprising. 2.5 Million of those who died who directly related to second hand smoke. The report also stated that 100,000 of the smoking-caused deaths over the past 20 years were babies who died from SIDS or other types of complications related to health problems caused from the parent’s smoking (or direct household exposure.)

When you think of all the American deaths caused by war, stop and think again how tobacco related deaths equal 10 times the number of of all the nation’s wars combined. For an excellent summary of the report. There is no safe cigarette, period.

 

Quit Smoking

Smoking a Cigarette is Like Drinking Formaldehyde

Each year in the state of Florida 28,000 people die from tobacco-related diseases.

Smoking and tobacco use amongst Floridians cost approximately $19.6 billion each year in health care costs and sickness.

Tobacco Free Florida exists to deter people from using tobacco products and to encourage those already using to quit using a powerful media campaign.

Tobacco Free Florida

The Tobacco Free Florida (TFF) program was established following a 2006 constitutional amendment where tobacco prevention programs were reinstated. The program is funded using money from tobacco settlement agreements.

Quit SmokingTFF offers on its website descriptive and honest reasons why people should quit smoking and using other products, such as smokeless tobacco. The site lists all the cancers that can occur from smoking or chewing, and even compares the health and wellness of a smoker to that of a non-smoker. For example, did you know that on average, a smoker will die thirteen to fourteen years before a non-smoker?

In addition to a section devoted to “quit tips,” the TFF site also offers online and telephone support. As an added incentive for people considering quitting, there are several video testimonials from former tobacco users who were able to overcome their addiction.

Known Carcinogen Formaldehyde in Cigarettes

There are thousands of chemicals in each cigarette, including chemicals that are known to cause cancer. For example, formaldehyde, the chemical used for preserving laboratory samples and dead bodies. This substance was classified by the US Department of Health and Human Services as a known human carcinogen in 2010.

On Average 10 Year Decrease in Life Expectancy for Smokers

If you are a smoker who just doesn’t want to quit, then you are subjecting yourself to a shorter life span than average.

By continuing to smoke, you have a greater chance of losing 10 years off your life, time that could be spent with your loved ones.

You also subject yourself to a general decline in health during those last years of your life while you are afflicted with one or several health complications as a result from smoking. These are health struggles that you also subject your loved ones to witness. Is it worth it?

What Quitting Smoking Can Do For You

Now that you know that a long-term smoker, on average, has a life expectancy of about 10 years less than a non-smoker, it is time to seek support and help to stop smoking now.

If you have smoked since your teen years or young adulthood, your chances of reversing any damage is significant. By stopping before the age of 35, you greatly improve your risk of any damage compared to people who have never smoked.

If you choose to stop smoking prior to the age of 50, the risk of dying from smoking-related diseases decreases by fifty percent. You can decrease that even further by making better health, nutrition, and diet choices.

Not Quitting Can Kill You

Quitting smoking not only dramatically improves your overall life expectancy, but it can improve your general well-being and overall health. No matter what your age or how long you’ve been smoking, it’s never too late to quit.

If you are hard-headed and need greater evidence on the decrease in life expectancy of smokers, take a look at this very long list of celebrities whose shortened life spans were caused from smoking tobacco.

As you can see, so many talented individuals died much earlier than the average life expectancy. And those who lived until their 80s struggled through many years of health afflictions—such as heart attack, emphysema, lung cancer, and throat cancer—due to their dangerous addiction to smoking.

Celebrity or not, no smoker is immune from smoking-related illnesses or even death.

Click for >  Celebrities Who Died From Smoking Related Illness

Smoking Related Fires: Unattended Smoking Materials Attribute to Natural Disasters, Civilian Deaths, and Injury Each Year

Smoking does not just cause health problems.

There are other cigarette dangers that go beyond the the obvious. They are a known fire hazard as well.

Fires caused by cigarette smoking are disastrous because an unattended cigarette can destroy an unknown number of lives directly and indirectly … and in an instant.

Statistics on Fires Related to Cigarette Smoking

Smoking accounts for more than 23,000 residential fires in a year nationwide. That’s why some insurance companies offer to reduce premiums if all the residents in the house do not smoke.

Insurance breaks for households where the occupants don’t smoke is probably one of the major reasons why smoking is no longer allowed inside or on the grounds of most work places hotels, restaurants, and pubs.

Unattended Cigarettes Cause Natural DisastersFACT: Smoking materials (i.e., cigarettes, cigars, pipes, etc.) are the leading cause of fire deaths in the United States. Roughly one of every four fire deaths in 2007 was attributed to smoking materials.

In 2007, there were an estimated 140,700 smoking-material fires in the United States. These fires caused 720 civilian deaths and 1,580 civilian injuries.

More fatal smoking-material fires start in bedrooms than in living rooms, family rooms and dens.

Older adults are at the highest risk of death or injury from smoking-material fires even though they are less likely to smoke than younger adults.

The most common items first ignited in home smoking-material fire deaths were upholstered furniture, mattresses and bedding.

Worldwide the loss of material goods and real estate is in the billions of dollars.

Who Do Fires Caused by Cigarette Smoking Hurt the Most?

Young children are the most vulnerable because their inquisitiveness and thirst for knowledge make them easy targets for experimentation with things they do not quite understand.

Toddlers crawl from pillar to post putting things in their mouths like lighters, cigarettes (new and used) and pipes. They are only imitating what they see their adult mentors do on a daily basis.

And while your impression is that the toddler will not be able to light that cigarette — smoke that pipe — or knock over that ashtray — while you are out of the room, major fire disasters can erupt. For example: You are in the kitchen cooking dinner while you think little Johnny is in his bed taking nap and…

Injury to Adults and Seniors

Adults to seniors, although on the opposite end of the spectrum of young children, fair no better because they can get careless and nod off to sleep, dropping that lit cigarette on a mattress, sofa, or carpet.  Smoke inhalation is such a powerful thing that it can keep you asleep longer and deeper than that well known brand of sleeping pill.

The Other Loss

We must also mention those who are left grieving for their lost loved one. We must also mention the family that survived the fire is left behind to grieve for the loved ones they lost. They’re still trying to understand how something so small as a cigarette could have caused so much damage.

And then there is the neighbor, tired after a 10 hour work day.  She arrives home while on the way thinking about a nice hot bath and a good night’s sleep to learn that she is suddenly homeless. The cigarette smoker next door may have caused a fire that consumed everything she owned other than the clothes on her back and the shoes on her feet.

Consider the Risk, Consider the Disaster

Cigarettes are the number one cause of house fire fatalities. And we haven’t even mentioned outdoor fires causes by careless smokers.

Fires caused by cigarettes result in around eight-hundred plus deaths each year. These fires usually occur when a smoker falls asleep without extinguishing a cigarette.

House fires from unattended cigarettes generally occurs at night, when the whole family is asleep, which can make it difficult for everyone to evacuate in time.

If you or another family member has a tobacco habit, make sure that no one ever smokes in bed.

As of March 2010, all 50 US states passed legislation and achieved their goal in getting cigarette manufacturers to produce only cigarettes that adhere to an established safety performance standard.

If you do smoke think about others. Stay alert and only smoke outside away from non smokers (and dispose of the butts properly). It is better for your family’s health and this one action will reduce the risk of a house fire.

Or better yet, don’t smoke at all and relieve everyone around you from an unnecessary potential disaster.

New Report on Global Tobacco Control Efforts

NEW YORK — WHO today released new data concerning tobacco control.

The data show that while progress has been made, not a single country fully implements all key tobacco control measures, and outlined an approach that governments can adopt to prevent tens of millions of premature deaths by the middle of this century.

In a new report which presents the first comprehensive analysis of global tobacco use and control efforts, WHO finds that only 5% of the world’s population live in countries that fully protect their population with any one of the key measures that reduce smoking rates.

The report also reveals that governments around the world collect 500 times more money in tobacco taxes each year than they spend on anti-tobacco efforts.

It finds that tobacco taxes, the single most effective strategy, could be significantly increased in nearly all countries, providing a source of sustainable funding to implement and enforce the recommended approach, a package of six policies called MPOWER (see below).

“While efforts to combat tobacco are gaining momentum, virtually every country needs to do more.

These six strategies are within the reach of every country, rich or poor and, when combined as a package, they offer us the best chance of reversing this growing epidemic,” said Dr Margaret Chan, Director-General of WHO. Dr Chan launched the WHO Report of the Global Tobacco Epidemic at a news conference with New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Bloomberg Philanthropies helped fund the report.

“The report released today is revolutionary,” Mayor Bloomberg said. “For the first time, we have both a rigorous approach to stop the tobacco epidemic and solid data to hold us all accountable. No country fully implements all of the MPOWER policies and 80% of countries don’t fully implement even one policy. While tobacco control measures are sometimes controversial, they save lives and governments need to step up and do the right thing.”The six MPOWER strategies are:

  1. Monitor tobacco use and prevention policies
  2. Protect people from tobacco smoke
  3. Offer help to quit tobacco use
  4. Warn about the dangers of tobacco
  5. Enforce bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship
  6. Raise taxes on tobacco

The report also documents the epidemic’s shift to the developing world, where 80% of the more than eight million annual tobacco-related deaths projected by 2030 are expected to occur.

This shift, the report says, results from a global tobacco industry strategy to target young people and adults in the developing world, ensuring that millions of people become fatally addicted every year. The targeting of young women in particular is highlighted as one of the “most ominous potential developments of the epidemic’s growth”.

The global analysis, compiled by WHO with information provided by 179 Member States, gives governments and other groups a baseline from which to monitor efforts to stop the epidemic in the years ahead. The MPOWER package provides countries with a roadmap to help them meet their commitments to the widely embraced global tobacco treaty known as the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, which came into force in 2005.

WHO WHO is also working with global partners to scale up the help that can be offered to countries to implement the strategies.

Dr Douglas Bettcher, Director of WHO’s Tobacco Free Initiative, said the six MPOWER strategies would create a powerful response to the tobacco epidemic. “This package will create an enabling environment to help current tobacco users quit, protect people from second-hand smoke and prevent young people from taking up the habit,” he said.

Other key findings in the report include:

  • Only 5% of the global population is protected by comprehensive national smoke-free legislation and 40% of countries still allow smoking in hospitals and schools;
  • Only 5% of the world’s population lives in countries with comprehensive national bans on tobacco advertising and promotion;
  • Just 15 countries, representing 6% of the global population, mandate pictorial warnings on tobacco packaging;
  • Services to treat tobacco dependence are fully available in only nine countries, covering 5% of the world’s people;
  • Tobacco tax revenues are more than 4000 times greater than spending on tobacco control in middle-income countries and more than 9000 times greater in lower-income countries. High- income countries collect about 340 times more money in tobacco taxes than they spend on tobacco control.

Source: Press Release

Tobacco May Kill 1 Billion in This Century, WHO Says

Tobacco use will kill 1 billion people in this century.

This is a 10-fold increase over the past 100 years, unless governments in poor nations raise taxes on consumption and mandate health warnings, the World Health Organization said.

No country fully implements these most important tobacco – control measures, according to a 330-page report released today by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and the Geneva-based UN agency.

Bloomberg, who helped fund the study, joined WHO Director-General Margaret Chan at a news conference in New York to discuss the findings. “This is a unique point in public health history as the forces of political will, policies and funding are aligned to create the momentum needed to dramatically reduce tobacco use and save millions of lives by the middle of this century,” Chan said in a foreword to the report.

The WHO said the tobacco “epidemic causes the deaths of 5.4 million people a year due to lung cancer, heart disease and other illnesses. That figure might rise to 8 million per year by 2030, including 80 percent in countries whose rapidly growing economies offer their citizens the hope of a better life,” the report said.

American States

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, said states are falling short on U.S. recommendations to boost insurance coverage of proven anti-smoking treatments that fight nicotine addiction.

The Atlanta-based U.S. government agency said eight states’ Medicaid programs, which serve the poor, fail to reimburse for any tobacco-dependence programs, and only Oregon covered them all. About 35 percent of Medicaid patients are smokers, it said.

Tobacco is the “single most preventable cause of death” in the world, the WHO said. Yet governments in low-and middle- income countries that collect $66.5 billion in taxes from the sale of tobacco products spend only $14 million on anti-smoking measures, and 95 percent of the world’s population is unprotected by the type of anti-smoking laws Bloomberg has pushed in New York.

Commitment Sought

“Now for the first time ever we have reliable data, a system of analysis and clear standards to promote accountability,” Bloomberg said of the report, which examines tobacco use in 179 countries.  “What we are still missing is a strong commitment from government leaders, but we believe this report will empower more leaders to act.”

Bloomberg, 65, the billionaire founder and majority owner of Bloomberg News parent Bloomberg LP, announced in 2006 he intended to donate $125 million to worldwide smoking-cessation efforts.

Bloomberg’s Health Department has made fighting tobacco use its top priority, enforcing age limits on smoking, distributing free nicotine patches and chewing gum though the city’s 311 telephone information number and producing television ads featuring a former smoker who lost his voice to throat cancer at age 39.

The Health Department reported in January that teenage cigarette use has been cut by half — to one in six teenagers — since Bloomberg became New York City’s mayor in 2002. That year, he persuaded the state legislature to ban smoking in indoor workplaces including bars and restaurants. He also fought for and won a cigarette tax increase of $1.50 that lifted the average price to about $7 per pack.

Role of Taxes

Smoking Pink LipstickThe WHO said raising taxes was the most effective way to reduce tobacco use, noting that a 70 percent increase would prevent a quarter of all tobacco-related deaths.

The report cites a 2001 study titled “Critical Issues in Global Health,” by epidemiologists Richard Peto and A. D. Lopez, edited by former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, as support for the assertion that population and smoking trends during the next several decades might lead to as many as 1 billion lives lost to smoking.

China, the world’s largest producer and consumer of tobacco, was highlighted by the UN agency. Almost 60 percent of men smoke cigarettes in China, compared with 21 percent in the U.S. At the same time, the report cited a survey that said most urban residents of China support a ban on tobacco advertising, higher tobacco taxes and smoke-free public places.

David Howard, a spokesman for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., which reported $8.5 billion in U.S. sales of brands such as Camel, Kool and Pall Mall cigarettes, said his company has expressed “the very clear opinion that smoking causes serious diseases.”

The company, owned by Winston-Salem, North Carolina-based Reynolds American Inc., continues its sales efforts, Howard said, because “there are about 45 million adults who are aware of the risks and have made the conscious decision to use tobacco products, and it’s a legal product.”

Source: By Henry Goldman and Bill Varner, Bloomberg [02-07-08]

Tobacco Deaths a Third World Plague

Facts tell us tobacco deaths on the rise and increasing in many countries.

Judith Longstaff Mackay, a senior policy adviser to the World Health Organisation, said cigarette markets were shrinking in advanced economies, but growing in developing states.

Tobacco-related deaths are expected to double to 10 million a year by 2030, with most fatalities in developing countries, says a senior World Lung Foundation (WLF) official.

“There’s about three million TB [tuberculosis] deaths a year, and five million deaths a year from tobacco,” said Mackay. “By 2030, that will be closer to 10 million, they’ll be doubling…and the major burden is on developing countries.”

Staring Contest by Cyril Van Der HaegenSmoking is a major cause of cancer of the lung, throat and bladder. Despite proof of the health risks, Mackay said more people were lighting up worldwide, with 1.64 billion smokers expected by 2030, from 1.3 billion today.

The American Cancer Society labels China a “ticking time bomb” with about 320 million smokers.

According to the 2006 edition of The Tobacco Atlas, published by the society, the four countries with the highest number of male smokers (who are the majority of the world’s smokers) were China, Yemen, Djibouti and Cambodia.

New Zealand Herald

National Association of Psychiatric Health Systems Teleconference Notes

The following information is a the Position Statement on Smoking Policy and Treatment at State Operated Psychiatric Hospitals.

Silently and insidiously tobacco sales and tobacco smoking became an accepted way of life not only in our society, but also in our public mental health treatment facilities.

Revenue from sales of tobacco provides discretionary income for facilities. Smoke breaks became an “entitlement,” deserved and protected, and are one of the only times consumers can practice relating to each other and staff in a “normalized” way.

When, what, and how much to smoke are often the only choices consumers make as inpatients, reinforcing cigarette use by virtue of the autonomy it appears to allow. More troubling, cigarettes used as positive/negative reinforcement by staff to control consumer behavior.

Logo ImageWhile taking seriously and treating illicit drug use by those with mental illness for some time, a substance far more deadly and pervasive, and used disproportionately by this population, has largely been ignored. And now, a few words about tobacco. It Kills. And, it kills those with mental illness disproportionately and earlier, as the leading contributor of disease and early death in this population.

A preponderance of evidence has clearly established the deleterious health effects of tobacco smoking and second hand or environmental tobacco smoke. Science as well as experiences in mental health facilities have also shown that tobacco smoking leads to negative outcomes for mental health treatment, the treatment milieu, overall wellness and, ultimately, recovery.

Smoking promotes coercion and violence in facilities among patients and between patients and staff. It occupies a surprising amount of staff and patient’s time that could be better used for more productive activities.

It is a poor substitute for practice in decision-making and relationship building and is inappropriate as a means to manage behavior within the treatment milieu. And, while smoking can be framed as the one – choice consumers get to make while inpatients, and a personal – choice for staff, it is critical to realize that addiction is not a choice. But, quitting smoking is.

While smoking has become more socially unacceptable and prevalence has decreased in the general population, much needs to be done to assist those with mental illness to quit. Currently, 59% of public mental health facilities allow smoking. If we agree that the goal shared by consumer and physician for mental health is recovery and that health and wellness is an integral part of that recovery, the issue of tobacco use in our facilities cannot be ignored.

As individuals committed to supporting health, wellness and recovery, and entrusted with the care and management of consumers and staff in our facilities and of limited public funds, we must act on what we know. Therefore, NASMHPD stands against tobacco and will take assertive steps to stop its use in the public mental health system.

As physicians, we commit to educating individuals about the effects of tobacco and facilitating and supporting their ability to manage their own physical wellness.

We will practice the 5 A’s; ASKING individuals about tobacco use, ADVISING users to quit, ASSESSING their readiness to make a quit attempt, ASSISTING with that attempt and ARRANGING follow-up care.

As administrators, we will commit the leadership and resources necessary to create smoke free systems of care, provide adequate planning, time and training for staff to implement new policies and procedures, and ensure access to adequate and appropriate medical and psychosocial cessation treatment for consumers and staff alike.

As partners in the recovery process, we will work with national organizations and decision makers, public and private service providers, and other support systems to ensure that those who want to be tobacco free have access to continued cessation treatment and support in the community.

Health and wellness is a shared responsibility. NASMHPD is committed to doing their part to assist individuals in going tobacco free and will continue to advocate for those with mental illness in their right and hope to be well in recovery.

Approved by the NASMHPD Membership on July 10, 2006

In a health care system:

  • Figure out who smokes
  • Educate staff
  • Integrate smoking cessation into mental health tx
  • Be attentive to co morbidity, make facility smoke-free to protect pts, families, staff

Smoke Free Facilities

50% of psychiatric facilities in the U.S. are now smoke-free, with approx 1 added each month.

SSM Health Care (21 Hospitals in 4 states) became totally smoke free (indoors and outdoors) in 2004.

Outcomes:

  • Number of behavioral health outpts identified as non-smokers increased by 20% after 5 months
  • Number of behavioral health inpts identified as non-smokers increased by 7%
  • Additional inpatient benefits:
  • Former smoking areas freed up space for alternate use
  • Daily chore of managing pt smoking, arguments about smoke break times and
    access to cigarettes, all disappeared
  • Census and pt satisfaction remained stable
  • Staff satisfaction increased because all the limit-setting regarding cigarettes was
    no longer an issue
  • Pt violence decreased on inpatient units without tobacco available.

From The National Association of Psychiatric Hospital Systems, July, 2007

  • The data is simply too compelling re: loss of life and function to continue to ignore the issues of smoking and mental illness any longer. This is a leadership issue as much as a policy and practice issue.
  • We must address staff-related smoking prevalence and quitting. Otherwise, culture change will not occur.

Banning smoking in psychiatric hospitals actually reduces mayhem. Facilities that do not allow smoking report fewer incidents of seclusion and restraint and a reduction in coercion and threats among patients and staff.

EMPLOYER BENEFITS of investing in a smoke-free workforce:

  • Health care costs are 40% higher for smokers than nonsmokers.
  • Smokers are absent from work 26% more often than non-smokers.
  • Smokers cost a company drug plan about twice as much as employees who do not smoke.

Additional teleconference notes:

There are approximately 438,000 tobacco-related deaths in the US each year. 44% of all cigarettes smoked are smoked by people who also suffer from mental illness and/or substance abuse. In contrast, only 102,000 will die from drugs and alcohol.

Psychiatric patients who smoke have 7X the heart disease rate and 7X the suicide rate of psychiatric patients who don’t smoke.

One third to one half of mentally ill smokers will die from smoking.

Tobacco companies have targeted poor, mentally ill, minorities with fewer resources. Sub Culture Urban Marketing (SCUM)

The number of cigarettes a person smokes a day directly correlates with an increased lifetime risk of developing Major Depression.

9% (approx. 40,000) of tobacco-related deaths are from second-hand smoke alone. This is nearly as many who die in the U.S. from motor vehicle accidents, and twice as many from drugs (other than alcohol). The Surgeon General’s most recent report states that there is no safe level of exposure to second-hand smoke.

8.6 million people become disabled each year in the US from tobacco.

The smoke, tar, and additives are what kill people. The nicotine just hooks them.

JCAHO is requiring that hospitals and both inpatient and outpt settings be conducive to quitting.

There are 11 PROVEN human carcinogens in tobacco smoke.

Fifty more are not yet proven, but suspected.

None of these are the nicotine itself, but the nicotine is what is addictive.

20.9% of adults smoke in the general population.

75% of those with addictions or mental illness smoke. 70% of people who smoke want to quit, including
the mental health population.

30-35% of the staff in mental health settings smoke.

35% people with panic disorder smoke

49% with depression smoke

80% with EOTH dependence smoke

88% with schizophrenia/bipolar disorder smoke

Depressed smokers have higher suicide rates than depressed non-smokers. People with any psychiatric disorder who smoke have 7X the rate of heart disease AND 7X the suicide rate than similar patients who don’t smoke.

Smokers have greater anxiety and panic than non-smokers. Heavy smoking in adolescence increases risk of later developing agoraphobia, GAD, panic disorder, increased risk of relapse during quit attempt.

Alcoholics have an increased urge to drink when they smell cigarettes.

People with serious mental illness die 25 years earlier than the general population, mostly from smoking, obesity, substance abuse, and inadequate access to medical care.

Smokers with schizophrenia spend more than one-quarter of their total income on cigarettes.

Smoking affects blood levels of psychotropic drugs. It can increase medication metabolism, so higher doses are needed when smoking, with greater potential for adverse effects. Doses may need to be lowered when pts quit, increased if pts start again.

There is increasing evidence that nicotine dependence treatment does not hurt recovery from mental illness or substance abuse and may improve outcomes. A short hospital stay is an opportunity to educate, give tools.

To TX Smoking Cessation and Depression

  • NRT (nic replacement therapy) alone is insufficient
  • SSRI’s alone have no benefit for smoking cessation but can reduce chance of depression during quit
    attempt, can be combined with Bupropion, NRT, and Varenicline
  • Bupropion can be used as monotherapy for both dx’s, can be combined with varenicline, tx may need
    to extend beyond usual 3-6 months.
  • Adding CBT has had mixed results.

*Anxiety and Smoking Cessation

  • SSRI’s alone have no benefit for smoking cessation but can reduce chance of anxiety or panic during
    quit attempt.
  • Bupropion not appropriate as monotherapy, but can be combined with NRT and Varenicline.

PTSD

  • Bupropion tolerated and effective

*Alcohol Dependence

  • Standard cessation treatments are effective.
  • No evidence of increased use of other substances during cessation treatment.
  • Alcohol abstinence days are greatest for those who quit smoking.
  • Alcoholics who smoke are 10X more likely to develop pancreatitis, have a 3X greater risk of
    cirrhosis,and are at greater risk of severe brain damage associated with alcohol dependence.
    Continued smoking diminishes recuperation from alcohol-related cognitive defecits during alcohol
    abstinence.

*Cessation for Shizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

  • Traditional cessation treatments may be inadequate.
  • Harm reduction and NRT
  • Hospitalization may be unique opportunities to initiate tx.
  • Bupropion can lead to quit rates comparable with general population.
  • Quit rates enhanced with CBT
  • Overall symptoms not worsened.

Resistance to Smoking Cessation for People with Mental Illness

  • Loved ones resist helping them quit
  • They feel protective and want to focus on quality, not quantity of life
  • But diseases caused by smoking can severely hamper quality as well as quantity of life
  • And second-hand smoke imperils loved ones and workers

Barriers to Successful Smoking Cessation

  • Provider inattention/pessimism
  • Belief that smoking cessation will adversely affect SA/MH tx
  • Co-dependency and mental illness
  • Mental health staff smoke
  • Historic attitudes about smoking in mental health community
  • No coverage for cessation drugs
  • Improper use of the drugs
  • Ignorance of quitlines 1-800-QUIT NOW
  • Lack of knowledge or risks/current research
  • Centuries-old split between treating the mind “vs.” the body
  • Social isolation of the mentally ill
  • Recovery from mental illness a relatively new concept
  • Historical use of cigarettes as behavior modification/control/reward/distraction/coping in psychiatric
    settings
  • Clash of emerging sense of inappropriateness of health care settings encouraging/permitting smoking
  • Mental health typically lagging behind other innovations and technologies in health care
  • Different agencies, funding, reimbursement (state Medicaid plans reimburse for smoking cessation; most
    private insurers don’t.)
  • Historical lack of research data (though current research demonstrates that quitting smoking does NOT
    jeopardize recovery and in fact leads to 25% greater chance of success in recovery)

Benefits From Treating Tobacco Dependence

  • Reduced morbity
  • 25% greater chance of abstinence from other substances (continued smoking identified as a factor in
    relapse to active substance abuse)
  • Reduce financial burden
  • Increase self-confidence
  • Increase focus on mental health and wellness
  • Remember that about half of smokers who want to quit will die from smoking.
  • If the cessation rate could increase to even just 10%, 1.2 million additional lives would be saved. No
    other health intervention could make such a huge difference!
  • Tobacco use negatively impacts other psychosocial issues that challenge clients in recovery: finances,
    health, HIV status, pregnancy, children’s health, treatment compliance, medications, dealing with
    feelings, social stigma

NEW DEVELOPMENTS
The National Partnership on Wellness and Smoking Cessation
Members:
NAPHS (National Association of Psychiatric Health Systems)
NASMHPD (National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors) See their tool kit “Tobacco
Free Living in Psychiatric Settings
http://www.nasmhpd.org/general_files/publications/NASMHPD.toolkit.FINAL.pdf

NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness). Read Position Statement section 7.3
http://www.nami.org/Content/ContentGroups/Policy/Public_Policy_Platform_April_07_marked.pdf
Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance
NASW (National Association of Social Workers)
+ approx. 20 other organizations and growing
Smoking Cessation Leadership Center Mental Health section web site:
http://smokingcessationleadership.ucsf.edu/Presentation07/NASMHPBHealth.pdf


Notes from Sally Caltrider [Retreath Healthcare, Brattleboro, VT]
Conference: July 26, 2007]

Four Million People Die Each Year From Smoking – Equal to 27 747’s Crashing Every Day

“Four million people die from tobacco related diseases yearly.

This is equivalent to twenty-seven 747 airplanes full of passengers crashing every day.”

“Every eight seconds someone in the world dies from a tobacco-related disease.”

“The number of tobacco related deaths are estimated to increase to 10 million in 2030; 7 million deaths will occur in developing countries, including the African region.”

WHO“Smokers and non-smokers are exposed to over 4,700 toxic substances in tobacco smoke and more than 50 of them are known human carcinogens, meaning cancer causing.”

~World Health Organization
Regional Office For Africa

Note: 4,700 toxic substances, that is an amazing smoking statistics to ponder. It is really almost daunting, and difficult to comprehend how our body is capable of handling this amount of toxicity. Makes a person think about the body’s abilities. Makes since if the body can handle this amount of abuse it must be pretty intelligent and capable of healing once a person stop’s their smoking habit