Tag Archives: tobacco prevention program

Aging of a Smoker’s Face Not a Pretty Picture

Have you ever wondered what you’ll look like in ten years? How about twenty?

If you’re a smoker, you’d be amazed—or more appropriately said, horrified—at how this habit can affect the way you look.

Innovative age progression software APRIL by Aprilage Development allows users to take a peek at what aging and smoking will do to them.

Smoking Intervention Tool

Age progression software APRIL is a revolutionary computer program that shows how one’s appearance can be dramatically affected with the use of tobacco. Designed to be used in schools by teachers wanting to educate students on tobacco use prevention and leading healthy lifestyles, the software predicts using images, the premature wrinkling and discoloration of one’s face.

APRIL is based on the “future-time” perspective, or the ability to understand how behavior in the present affects one’s self in the future. This perspective has been proven to be highly effective as a smoking deterrent.

This smoking intervention tool was developed using a five-year long study of the physical characteristics involving over 7,000 people whose age, ethnicity, and lifestyle habits varied.

Smoking and Facial Appearance

Image of a Smoker and a Non-SmokerSmoking affects the appearance of people in a vast number of ways. However, a general guideline is that a pack a day habit can make an individual look 1.4 times as old as they really are. For example, a 20-year-old who smokes a pack a day can actually look 28, and a 40-year-old can look 56. Some studies also suggest that this guideline increases the older a smoker gets (as in some 40-year-old smokers can appear up to 20 years older than they really are).

Smoking leads to premature wrinkling of the skin. Smokers often notice their crows feet are sharper and deeper than those of a non-smoker, and numerous wrinkles appear on the cheeks, jaw, and around the lips.

Most smokers also take on an unhealthy grey tone to their skin. Once a smoker has quit the habit for a period of time, the skin’s natural color and rosy tint can reappear.

Users of the APRIL program can see the age progression of themselves both as a non-smoker and as a smoker with a pack a day habit. The comparison between these two scenarios is astonishing.

Watch New Report on Computer Demonstration of Aging Smokers

Click to see more >  Videos Comparing Aging Smoking VS not Smoking

Mississippi is 27th for Anti-Tobacco Money

Once among the nation’s leaders for anti-smoking campaigns for youth and teens, Mississippi now ranks 27th among states that spend money on tobacco prevention, a new report says.

The report released Wednesday also found that tobacco companies spend $183 million a year on marketing in Mississippi, almost 23 times the state funding for tobacco prevention.

State Health Officer Dr. Ed Thompson said there’s been some decline in youth tobacco use rates in the state, but there’s a “great deal of competition from the tobacco industry so that’s an uphill battle.”

Overall, states this year have increased total funding for tobacco prevention programs by 20 percent to $717 million, the report said.

Maine, Delaware and Colorado were the only three states that funded tobacco prevention programs at minimum levels recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the report said.

Issued by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, American Heart Association, American Lung Association and the American Cancer Society, the report called for the implementation of tobacco control measures. Those included prevention programs, higher tobacco taxes and smoke-free workplace laws.

Mississippi ranked last in the nation in 2006, but moved up after Gov. Haley Barbour approved $8 million for a state-funded tobacco prevention program within the Department of Health during this year’s legislative session.

The bottom ranking resulted from the court-ordered termination of $20 million in annual funding for the Partnership for a Healthy Mississippi, a private, nonprofit headed by former Mississippi attorney general Mike Moore.

The Partnership’s money had come from the state’s settlement with the tobacco industry in the 1990s. Barbour successfully sued to cut off the Partnership’s money, saying only the Legislature has the authority to decide how that money should be spent.

William V. Corr, executive director of Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, said in a statement that Mississippi “has a long way to go in re-establishing an effective program.”

MississippiIt’s been 10 years since a landmark multistate settlement with the tobacco industry. Moore filed the first such lawsuit against the cigarette makers, forcing them to cover medical costs of people who became sick from their products. The nationwide settlement came soon after, but states weren’t required to create tobacco prevention programs.

With Moore at its helm, the Partnership set a standard for anti-tobacco programming, using catchy advertisements, churches, community coalitions, and school nurses to warn teens about the dangers of smoking. Mississippi’s teen smoking rate was 22.4 percent in 2004, and fell to 18.7 percent by 2006.

Thompson said the new state-funded program is still being developed and Moore is chairman of its advisory council.

“Certainly use of media is going to be one of the elements that they’ll consider and place into the mix,” said Thompson.

As far as increasing funding for tobacco prevention, lawmakers are reluctant to make any promises. Mississippi’s economic forecast shows slow growth, and lawmakers have predicted budget cuts for next year.

“Increasing funding for tobacco prevention is a very worthwhile project and it merits consideration,” said Senate Public Health Committee Chairman Alan Nunnelee. “But it’s far too early to make any commitments about what will or won’t be funded.”

Source: AP