Tag Archives: tobacco ads

Big Tobacco Gets Intimate with Girls and Women with Kiss Cigarettes

Sorry to say, but we are not making this stuff up.

We were researching internet statistics on how many women and men will not date a smoker. They are turned off by the awful ashtray taste and breath odor and wouldn’t think of kissing someone who repels them.

When googling the phrase “kiss a smoker,” we found listed among the top choices a web page advertising a brand of cigarettes completely designed to entice women and young girls to purchase them to become sexier. At first, I thought the title and description couldn’t be real. It had to be a spoof, right? NOT.

Big Tobacco’s Marketing Scheme

Another search lead me to a discount cigarette website selling this brand. The name: “Kiss.” The marketing copy was horrifying, and completely targeting young girls:

Kiss Brand CigarettesKiss cigarettes are produced under the supervision of the British “Innovation Tobacco Company” using the best tobaccos Virginia and Barley. “Innovation Tobacco Company” cooperates with world’s biggest suppliers, which guarantees high quality of all components of Kiss Menthol cigarettes. Discount Kiss cigarettes are created by the excellent cigarette’s foreign specialists.

Kiss cigarettes are manufactured under control of foreign cigarette specialists. Quality is executed at every technological stage level. The secret of the high-quality of Kiss cigarettes is in the balanced selection of discount cigarettes tobacco leaf, cultivated in various corners of the planet like Greece, Brazil, Argentine and Malawi. Kiss cigarettes blend trend—American blend—is the most popular and fashionable nowadays. Kiss Superslims cigarettes brand answers the girls’ wishes to be economic and offers a very reasonable price.

Kiss cigarettes are for those who feel young, bright, self-confident—and a bit crazy!

Innovative Tobacco Products Annual Report

Kiss CigaretteAgain, I can’t make this stuff up. Here is what it should say:

If you want to see who is getting rich at the expense of young girls and women’s health, check out > Innovative Tobacco Product’s annual report.

When Women and Girls Aren’t Pretty in Pink

This last month WHO, the World Health Organization focused more attention on tobacco ads that target women and girls.

Females represent a large market of potential new smokers, especially woman and young females in developing countries.

Take a look at many of the new Big Tobacco’s aggressive campaigns and ads. You will find them linked to fashion, entertainment, and even sports events. Marketing tactics don’t stop at ad campaigns. The latest package designs and the look and feel of many cigarettes are clearly made for “females only.”

“The industry’s market strategy is having its desired impact,” Douglas Bettcher, director of WHO’s tobacco free initiative, said at a news briefing. “More and more girls are starting to light up. This is a serious red flag.”

World No Tobacco Day Released Youth Smoking Survey

In the countries of Chile, Colombia, and Mexico as well as in Eastern Europe teenage girls who smoke is beginning to outnumber teenage male smokers.

Comparing 151 country’s numbers we find girls that are lighting up is now equaling male youth smokers who once dominated younger users.

Pretty in Pink, NOTThe low and middle income country’s tobacco campaigns often use very seductive ads that associate tobacco use with beauty and liberation. Pink is becoming a trendy, smoking fashion statement.

Pink Cigarettes & Fashion Pink Packaging

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to realize five million people die every year from tobacco-related health problems caused from smoking or second-hand smoke exposure. Two of the three who die from second hand smoke related deaths are women.

Japan tobacco campaigns include pink packs of cigarettes and one cigarette maker in Egypt markets a cigarette pack that resembles a perfume container.

“The industry has studied what makes women tick in both the developed and developing countries,” said Adepeju Olukoya, of the WHO’s gender, women and health department.

Enticing Flavored Cigarettes

Flavored CigarettesAppealing to the market of emotional eaters, taste is another niche to hook new smokers.

The Black Devil Brand comes in an assortment of flavors and colors. Even the name implies you can do something “naughty” and get away with it.

The pink cigarettes are flavored with “Rose” which is one of the most appealing of fragrances in the world. The black package contains chocolate flavored death sticks, one of the most sought after tastes and foods.

By piggybacking on “Chocolate and Roses” the cigarettes mask the reality that their ingredients and harmful, toxic and can shorten one’s life. Praying on the emotions of young people to get them to pick up their first cigarette is a pretty disgusting tactic. Especially, since younger people are the least likely to contemplate mortality and the pain associated with prolonged health problems.

Most of us know how easy it is to become hooked on tobacco when the cigarettes are laced with ingredients that also stimulate the addictive centers in the brain.

Next we may see prescription drug manufacturers doing the same thing.

Reference:
(Editing by Michael Taylor) http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSLDE64R1Z420100528?type=marketsNews

Tobacco Industry Puts Profits Before Kids in Defeating Oregon Ballot Initiative

Statement of William V. Corr, Executive Director, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

Tobacco or Kids? Who has values?

Washington, Nov. 7 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — By telling $12 million worth of lies, the Philip Morris and R.J. Reynolds tobacco companies have again protected their profits at the expense of children.

By defeating a ballot initiative to increase Oregon’s cigarette tax and fund health care for children it is pretty evident where big tobacco stands.

The tobacco companies will profit by selling more cigarettes, while Oregonians will pay a terrible price with more kids addicted to tobacco, more lives lost and more kids without health care.

Philip Morris and R.J. Reynolds opposed this initiative because they know that increasing the cigarette tax is one of the most effective ways to reduce smoking, especially among children, and they also know that the public strongly supports increasing the cigarette tax.

These tobacco companies knew they couldn’t win by arguing against the cigarette tax increase, so they spent a record $12 million to change the subject and deceive the voters of Oregon. In fact, the tobacco companies made this election about anything but the cigarette tax increase, which is the one issue they truly cared about.

Throughout the campaign, media reports regularly exposed the industry’s deceptive tactics, including the creation of an industry-funded front group — Oregonians Against the Blank Check; RJR’s distribution of a mass-mailed letter that appeared to come from a first-grade teacher, but was mailed from the office of the company’s lobbyist; and false claims in TV ads.

The tobacco companies’ ads falsely claimed that the money raised would not be spent on children’s health care and manufactured controversy about amending the Oregon Constitution despite the fact it has similarly been amended many times (and the tobacco companies themselves have proposed constitutional amendments in other states).

The $12 million spent by Philip Morris and R.J. Reynolds more than doubled the previous record for an Oregon ballot initiative and was nearly four times what proponents of the initiative spent. Philip Morris and R.J. Reynolds should be held accountable for the high cost in health, lives and money that the people of Oregon will pay.

Because this measure was defeated, 29,000 more kids will become smokers, 13,000 lives will be lost to tobacco-caused disease, and Oregon will pay $662 million more in long-term health care costs. In addition, more than 100,000 deserving Oregon children will go without the health coverage Measure 50 would have provided.

Image of KidsThe Oregon outcome does not change the fact that the public strongly supports increasing tobacco taxes. National and state polls across the country show overwhelming support for tobacco tax increases — support that extends across party lines, from smokers and non-smokers alike, throughout
all regions.

Since Jan. 1, 2002, 44 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia have increased their cigarette tax rates more than 75 times — more than doubling the national average cigarette tax from 43.4 cents to $1.09 a pack. Increasing federal and cigarette taxes remains one of the most effective ways to reduce smoking, especially among kids, and the public will continue to support it.

Source: Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

Those Who Don’t Know History…

I’ve been on my high horse today about Big Tobacco trying to squirm out of facing responsibility for killing people.

I do recognize my own responsibility of making the initial choice to try a sickarette.

But I also feel it’s appropriate for BT to accept its role in making sure people stay “life long customers”.

So I looked something up in a great body of information that you can find at your fingertips in Answers.com about Big Tobacco and it’s interesting reading.

Thought I would share it with you. There’s a lot of history preceding this clip, mostly telling about how American and European cigarette manufacturing grew and eventually a monopoly of sorts was formed and subsequently broken up.

Then… (emphasis added below are my own)…

In 1913 the newly independent R. J. Reynolds launched Camels, the “first modern cigarette.” Camels were quickly imitated by American’s Lucky Strike and Liggett and Myers’ revamped Chesterfield cigarettes.

All three brands stressed their mildness and catered their appeal to men and women alike. The 1920s saw the “conversion” of many tobacco consumers to the cigarette in the Unites States, United Kingdom, Europe, China, and Japan. In the full entry on The Tobacco Industry we learn between 1920 and 1930, U.S. cigarette consumption doubled to 1,370 cigarettes per capita.

The article goes on to talk about how marketing played a vital role. I remember cigarette ads talking about how doctors preferred this over that brand, and how much better for you one cigarette was than another. I can’t tell you how strong an influence these clever ploys had over what was and wasn’t accepted.

The article continues:

Prior to World War II, cases of lung cancer were relatively rare in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada, the heaviest-smoking countries, but rates in men were rising fast…

A lot of issues were being raised and health concerns were at the top of the list, but Big Tobacco did its best to allay the fears and by the 60’s just about everybody smoked “filtered” cigarettes because BT had assured the world were “…less harsh and harmful…”

The Long Road Ahead, The Long Road Behind…are doomed to repeat it. And so it has gone, and all the while the government taxed the sale of tobacco products and increased its revenues. While they got money that way, money also entered government in the form of lobbyist funding. The more our government depends on these revenues, the more it can be said that it is also becoming addicted, though not in the sense we’re addicted as individuals.

Honestly – it has to end somewhere. If we know the history of the industry, and if we can apply the mental facilities with which we are blessed and learn from our mistakes, we should be able as a society to stop the madness and end the senseless suffering and death of consumers who just didn’t understand the real consequences of their choices.

We all have to accept responsibility for our actions. Let’s examine who is responsible for what, and govern ourselves accordingly.

~GareK