Tag Archives: stress

Women Celebrating Smoke Free Lives

Smoke Free Women is an organization serving as a resource for women who are looking to quit smoking, as well as acting as a support system for women who have already quit.

Approximately one in five American women is a smoker. Almost 80% of them have a desire to quit.

Created by the Tobacco Control Research Branch of the National Cancer Institute, Smoke Free Women offers women and their friends and family help on achieving this goal.

Smoke Free Women: Help Quitting

Stubbed out CigaretteThe Smoke Free Women website offers many different quit-smoking resources, including:

  • an online cessation guide designed by health professionals and ex-smokers;
  • information database on various smoking related issues and quitting topics, such as the benefits of quitting, depression, pregnancy and smoking, second hand smoke, stress and weight concerns, and withdrawal symptoms;
  • various quizzes to help gauge mental status and interpersonal relationships;
  • information for numerous quit lines featuring health councilors and web resources; and
  • a publications library of information on quitting, pregnancy and smoking, smoking later in life, and more.

Celebrating Smoke Free Voices

To celebrate the one year anniversary of the creation of the Smoke Free Women website, the organization established a video contest. This inspiring contest was to provide a platform for people to creatively express themselves in self-made videos that were entered in one of two categories.

The first category was open for videos focusing on the topic “Why I am a smoke free women.” Entrants were encouraged to enter videos that explained why they stay smoke free, their reasons for quitting, and what it means to be a smoke free woman.

Video Winner: Why I am a Smoke Free Woman

The second category was the topic “Why I want YOU to be smoke free,” giving friends or relatives of smokers an opportunity to share why they wanted a loved one to be smoke free.

Video Winner: Why I Want You to be Smoke Free

Smoke Free Women has helped women from across the country with their smoking cessation needs, and the videos of success from these women are truly inspirational.

Reference:  Smoke Free Women [http://women.smokefree.gov]

We Quit Smoking for Love. We Both Succeeded.

I want a cigarette so bad.

Yesterday, we fought with tech support of our Internet service provider…for hours. They kept putting us on hold, handing us to different departments, saying one thing, then contradicting themselves. Seems the corporate behemoth would see fit to train their support personnel.

Now, today, the stress is catching up with me. I haven’t yearned for a cigarette like this in years. Years!

My wife and I quit smoking 8 or 9 years ago. We kept track of the date for some time. After a while, it didn’t matter. What mattered was we actually did quit. For good.

We Quit for Good

Not one cigarette since. Not when we were stressed. Not with morning coffee. Not when inadvertently inhaling the allure and promise of second hand smoke. Not when a friend across the table lit up; not even when the friend gestured to help ourselves to the pack.

Our minds’, “One won’t matter. I quit once, I can do it again anytime I want” justification never did get the best of us.

Quitting smoking was the hardest thing I ever did.

Mary and Will Bontrager Choose HealthOh, I had quit before. Many times. Before I met Mari.

Most quitting lasted just long enough to reason with myself that I was young and I had plenty of time to quit. I really didn’t need to do it now. Why not enjoy myself? I could quit later!

I even quit for a month and a half, once.

That was broken one evening when I went to a bar and proceeded to get slightly drunk. A friend was with me. He smoked.

Like an everlasting fool, I asked him for a cigarette. He asked me if I was sure. “Sure I’m sure,” I said. “I’m no longer a smoker. I’ll prove to you I can smoke one cigarette and never smoke again.”

He said, “No, you can’t. If you really want a cigarette, I’ll give it to you. But I tell you now, you will become a smoker again.”

He was right.

This Time the Love was Real

Eleven years ago, I met my wife, Mari. There were times before when I thought I was in love. But this was real.

We both smoked.

One day, we talked about the future. The subject of health came up. We decided to quit so we could be together longer.

When I quit for myself, I always failed. The first time I quit for love, I succeeded. We both succeeded.

Will Bontrager is owner and operator of the free numerology readings web site, AffinityNumerology.com.

Smokers Use Cigarettes to Cope with Stress

Smokers are poorly equipped to deal with distress without resorting to cigarettes because of their implicit belief that smoking helps them to deal with difficult feelings, a conference for psychologists was told yesterday.

Nigel Vahey of NUI Maynooth said research had found that a key psychological component of tobacco-dependence involved the implicit belief that smoking was an effective way of regulating unpalatable feelings.

“In other words, to the degree that smokers implicitly believe that smoking can enhance their enjoyment and reduce their stress levels, then they are more likely to engage in smoking as a means of controlling and coping with fluctuating feelings throughout the day,” he said.

Smoking was used as a way to avoid dealing with painful thoughts and emotions but this was unproductive as it did not make those feelings go away permanently.

Young Smoker“Such people who smoke to regulate their feelings, whether consciously or unconsciously, become very poorly equipped to cope with distress of any sort without recourse to smoking,” Mr Vahey said. This made quitting even more difficult. “Smokers must not only cope with biological cravings for nicotine, but must also learn to cope with distressing feelings in more productive ways.” He said treatment that dealt with this issue was more successful long term than nicotine replacement therapy or other medications.

Mr Vahey was speaking at the Psychological Society of Ireland’s annual conference which ended yesterday in Tullow, Co Carlow. Earlier, the conference heard a call for proper training for juries in cyber-crime cases.

This article appears in the print edition of the Irish Times, LISON HEALY