Tag Archives: smoking prevention

Family Friendly Sporting Events – No More Cigarette Ads

The New Tobacco Laws Are Now Rolling Out

Last year’s Tobacco Control Act was crafted with prevention in mind targeting youth smokers.

But, the new tobacco regulations that became effective in June 2010 may also encourage adults to stop smoking.

I agree with Jeanne Sager of, “The Stir.” She posted on her blog on June 25th that the effects of last week’s legislation of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act “will have some major adult effects too.”

Having a law that helps to prevent smoking for all members of a family does not come any time too soon.

Effects of the New Tobacco Law on Adults

Small Packs of CigarettesSager pointed out, “the small packs of ‘twenty’ or less cigarettes” will not be allowed to be sold. This change will hit the pocket book of some smokers who can’t afford to cut into their budget for the larger packs.

No longer can a smoker purchase a few cigarettes when cash is low or if they are young smokers who can only afford to buy a few at a time.

Another change, is the use of the words, ultra light, mild, and low-tar are now banned to clearly dispel any illusions that some tobacco products carry less dangers than others.

Tobacco companies use to offer gifts with purchases to entice young and adult smokers to buy more tobacco products. This incentive will stop with the new tobacco tax codes.

Imagine Sporting Events without Cigarette Ads

One of most far reaching regulations and perhaps one of the most significant will be the absence of all the tobacco ads that are repeated over and over at sporting events.

Like a hypnotic suggestion, the repetitive tobacco ads clearly prompted a smoker to reach for a cigarette just when the game began to get exciting.

Like Sager says, “the temptation is gone.” Now the playing field is more family friendly at sporting events than they have been in years.

Fewer cigarette ads mean less lure for kids to accept that smoking is a part of the typical sporting event experience.

Reference: The Tobacco Act: 4 Reasons it will Make You Quit

Alabama Ranks 49th Nationally in Funding Tobacco Prevention

You’ve heard all the warnings and scientific data, even seen disclaimers on the side of the box of cigarettes.

Many times, however, it doesn’t stop your child from picking up a cigarette.

11,100 of Alabama’s kids start smoking each year, and 24.4% of high school students in the state smoke regularly. That’s an early start to a deadly habit.

“80 to 90% percent of smoking adults started before the age of 18. There’s good data that if you can keep young people from ever beginning to smoke, they never will smoke,” said Dr. Don Williamson, Alabama’s State Health Officer.

Prevention, however, is hard to accomplish. According to a new study from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Alabama ranks 49th when it comes to funding tobacco prevention programs, spending only 2.9% CDC’s minimum recommendations. Health administrators say their hands are tied.

“It costs twenty million dollars if you want to do it right. In Alabama, we’re not going to get twenty million dollars,” Williamson said.

With settlement money from tobacco companies tied up in other state programs, funding to help prevent and put an end to teen smoking is scarce.

Alabama Map“Bottom line is we just don’t have enough dollars in the state to do the effective job on smoking cessation that we’d like,” Williamson explained.

The Department of Public Health will ask for $4,000,000 to help aid tobacco prevention and treatment.

Though it’s still far less than the Federal government recommends, the amount is more than five times what the state currently spends on those programs.

Source: Cody Holyoke

Cigarettes are Like a Dirty Syringe

If cigarettes were made without nicotine in its natural form or added to make them more addictive, few people would smoke them, says Prof. Peter Hajek, a clinical psychologist in London who specializes in treating and researching tobacco dependence.

Hajek, here on his third visit to participate in a Kfar Hamaccabiah conference on smoking prevention and cessation organized by the Israel Cancer Association and other groups, told The Jerusalem Post in an interview on Thursday that nicotine itself is “relatively harmless.

It is the tar, numerous carcinogens and other rubbish in smoke that cause such great damage to health. Except for pregnant women, whose fetuses can be harmed by nicotine, cigarettes are like injecting a relatively safe drug into yourself with a dirty syringe.”

Picture of InjectionThe Moravian (Czechoslovakian)-born expert, who heads the psychology section at Barts and the London teaching hospital at Queen Mary’s School of Medicine and Dentistry, said that oral and tactile gratification supposedly felt by smokers with cigarettes in their mouths and fingers play “less of a role than we thought.

In fact, the main effect of smoking is to counteract withdrawal symptoms. When smokers addicted to nicotine are between cigarettes, they suffer discomfort and may be irritable and restless. The ‘enjoyment’ they feel is getting the nicotine again to combat these withdrawal symptoms.” Oral and tactile gratification could more safely be provided by holding carrot sticks or blowing bubbles, Hajek joked.

Nicotine-free cigarettes are available on the British market, but very few people buy them because it is the nicotine to which smokers are addicted, and without this drug, smokers get no satisfaction. Many drug companies are working on nicotine-delivery systems that could replace cigarettes, as there is a lot of money in this.

“Most people know smoking is dangerous and want to quit, but many find it very difficult.,” said Hajek, a consultant on smoking cessation to the World Health Organization who himself once smoked as a student “for social reasons, as a decorative smoker who thought they make me look good.”

Commercial firms that claim to cure smokers’ addiction may mislead customers, as there are “many different ways to calculate the success rate. If they send out letters a year afterward to 100 people, and only 10 respond, with nine saying they are still not smoking, it doesn’t mean they have a 90% success rate.

The 90 people who did not respond are likely to be ashamed to say they have relapsed. People want to be nice and say they quit. However, in our studies at Bart and The London, we do validation. We don’t just take their word for it but take a blood sample or have them breathe into a device.

We do it the hard way. Of 500,000 British people a year who are treated for nicotine addiction, half stop smoking for six months, and 15% for a year. This figure might not seem like a lot, but giving up smoking is one of the most significant existing means to improve health.”

About a quarter of the British population – similar to Israel’s – smoke. Britain’s National Health Service offers free smoking cessation courses – but these are not included in Israel’s basket of health services: “It is a treatment like any other, so it should be free here,” he said.

As only a small minority of smokers manage to quit on their own, there are a variety of methods, including psychological support and medications to help. The newest drug, called Champix, is according to some studies more effective than Zyban, which has been available for several years. There are also nicotine chewing gums and patches to help those who have quit to be weaned from their addiction.

But tobacco addiction is not treated like a bacterial infection in which you just take a penicillin pill, he said. “You have to change behavior. Just taking Champix, Zyban or a nicotine patch is not enough. You need psychological support.” The best guarantee of success, he said, “is if the smoker is determined to stop.”

Source: Judy Siegel-Itzkovich, THE JERUSALEM POST

Smokers Risk Damage to All Major Body Organs

Health Consequences of Smoking, Surgeon General’s Report

Smokers risk damage to almost all major organs in their bodies, according to the latest report by the surgeon general

The list of diseases caused by tobacco now includes cancers of the kidneys, stomach, cervix, and pancreas as well as leukemia, cataracts, pneumonia, and gum disease.

These illnesses are in addition to diseases previously known to be caused by smoking: bladder, esophageal, laryngeal, lung, oral, and throat cancers, chronic lung diseases, coronary heart and cardiovascular diseases, and sudden infant death syndrome.

Smoking also reduces overall health, contributing to conditions such as hip fractures, complications from diabetes, increased wound infections following surgery, and various reproductive problems.

Smoking cigarettes with lower machine-measured yields of tar and nicotine does not help.

Body Picture“There is no safe cigarette, whether it is called light, ultra-light, or any other name,” U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Richard Carmona commented. “The science is clear: the only way to avoid the health hazards of smoking is to quit completely or to never start smoking” (Health and Human Services, Press Release).

Statistics of Smoking Related Deaths

By current estimates, tobacco use causes 440,000 deaths per year and costs about $157 billion in health-related losses. An estimated 46,000 adults smoked in 2001. On average, men who smoke cut their lives short by 13.2 years, and female smokers lose 14.5 years. “Since the 1964 surgeon general’s report, more than 12 million people have died from smoking-related illness,” Dr. Carmona said.

“These include 4.1 million deaths from cancer, 5.5 million deaths from cardiovascular diseases, 2.1 million deaths from respiratory diseases, and 94,000 perinatal deaths. We’ve known for decades that smoking is bad for your health, but this [latest] report shows that it’s even worse than we knew. The toxins from cigarette smoke go everywhere the blood flows.”

Quitting smoking has immediate as well as long-term benefits, according to the surgeon general’s report. The heart rate drops towards normal and circulation improves. The risk of having a heart attack or stroke or of developing lung cancer diminishes. Even seniors who quit after many years can experience positive effects. A smoker who gives up the habit at the age of 65 reduces his or her risk of dying from a tobacco-related disease by half.

Learning More About Tobacco Use

The surgeon general’s report was based on a review of 1,600 articles. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has made these available to the public online on a searchable database (Health Consequence of Smoking, CDC Database).

For online tips and advice about how to quit smoking, see Tobacco Information and Prevention, and the American Cancer Society Guide to Quitting Smoking.

The American Cancer Society Guide provides a smoking cessation plan, explains how to deal with withdrawal and cravings, and lists useful anti-tobacco groups.

(Health Consequences of Smoking, Surgeon General’s Report).

Source: http://www.braytonlaw.com/news/mednews/091004_tobacco_surgeong.htm, a web site sponsored by the law firm of Brayton Purcell for educational purposes.