Tag Archives: smoking deaths

Dangers of Smoking Label

The FDA’s 9 New Cigarette Health Warnings

September 22, 2012 marks a monumental change in the appearance of cigarette packaging in the United States.

At this time, new warning labels must appear on all cigarette packs. Each warning targets a specific danger of smoking with a graphic color image that communicates the intent of the warning. There were 9 significant warnings decided upon out of the initial 36 proposed in November 2010 when the label revamping ruling selection began. Part of the process included a time of evaluating public comments.

On September 22, 2012 big tobacco manufacturers will no longer be able to distribute cigarettes in the United States unless their package designs display the one of the 9 warning labels.

Graphic Incentives to Quit Smoking

New FDA Cigarette Package Warning LabelThe final selection of 9 FDA cigarette warning labels hope to target youth smokers making them more aware to empower them to never start smoking. The labels also increase awareness of the some of the health risks and diseases related to smoking by providing a graphic incentive to appeal to smokers to get them to quit.

Since research suggests that nicotine is as addictive as heroin, cocaine, or alcohol and that the frequency of smoking is often what prevents people from quitting, a strong intent behind these graphic labels is that perhaps each time someone picks up a pack, the image could put them over the edge into the say no or quit category.

The 9 cigarette label warnings cover these concerns:

  1. Cigarettes are addictive.
  2. Tobacco smoke can harm your children.
  3. Cigarettes cause fatal lung disease.
  4. Cigarettes cause cancer.
  5. Cigarettes cause strokes and heart disease.
  6. Smoking during pregnancy can harm your baby.
  7. Smoking can kill you.
  8. Tobacco smoke causes fatal lung disease in nonsmokers.
  9. Quitting smoking now greatly reduces serious risks to your health.

Along with each of the warnings are corresponding smoking facts that give smokers a lot to think about.

Not Soon Enough for Many

We can’t help but think how many lives would have been different had smokers truly been informed of the dangers of inhaling tobacco smoke before they picked up their habit or exposed others to the toxic fumes. I think only those with a death wish would have started smoking or exposed their loved ones.

Just recently, we received this heartbreaking letter from a caregiver taking care of a parent who developed serious health problems brought on from smoking and died a horrible death. Should we all have the choice of a better quality of life?

Smoking Killed my Mom: 4 Years As A Caregiver

FDA Warning LabelThere are no words to express fully express our condolences to the author of this letter. For their privacy we are not including their name, but the content is published in its unedited form:

Thank you so much for taking the time to express your condolences. I am devastated by the loss of my mother, and I am not handling her death well at all. The fact that it was so senseless makes it that much harder to bear. The fact that she suffered so needlessly…

She had gangrene in her little toe. That’s how it all started. She needed surgery to unblock her right carotid artery. It was discovered that her circulation was completely blocked from her right hip to her foot. The surgeons unblocked the arteries and put stents in. Her toe even healed, but she wouldn’t quit smoking. When she started showing signs of the same problem, I made her quit. We got into huge arguments, but it was already too late. They ended up amputating the entire front of her right foot.

Every day, I had to change her bandage at least twice. I had to flush this gaping, horrific wound, put antibiotic cream over it, then re-wrap it in clean gauze. Every night, I had to listen to her beg me for more pain medication that I could not give her. After three months of hell, the doctors amputated her right leg below the knee. This wound healed, but her independence had been seriously compromised forever. Her ability to breathe was rapidly deteriorating as well.

StethoscopeNear the end of March 2010, she said she needed to go to the hospital because she couldn’t breathe. Five minutes more, and they would have had to intubate her. They put her on steroids to help reduce the inflammation in her seriously damaged lungs. A few days later, they did a bronchoscopy and suctioned a bunch of crap out of her lungs. She was sent to a nursing home to recoup. The steroids raised her blood sugar and made insulin necessary. They also caused her to gain a significant amount of weight, which further hindered her ability to breathe.

Right before she was due to come home, the nursing home sent her to the ER. When my best friend and I arrived, she wasn’t in any distress. Mom really wasn’t sure why they had sent her at all. Unfortunately, sitting on the gurney for so long caused a massive cramp in her hip. She went into respiratory distress and deteriorated rapidly. She wound up staying in the hospital for a week. That’s when her doctor called and told me that there was no way I would be able to handle her care on my own anymore. He ordered her to be placed in a nursing home. You don’t even want to know the hell that the two of us went through with that place. She had pneumonia in December of 2010. When she had sufficiently recovered, they had to amputate her left leg below the knee as well.

The Saturday before she died (she died the week of Easter Sunday), I went to pick up her laundry as usual. She was sleeping, but very restless. She cried out in pain and sat straight up in bed. I asked her if she was okay. She said yes. I asked her why she hadn’t eaten any of her dinner yet (her tray was untouched, unusual for her). She picked up her fork and started pushing the food around. “I’ve been eating” she said. I went to fill her pitcher with fresh ice water. I came back and she was sound asleep again.

I asked the two aides in the room how long she had been like this. They shrugged and said, “She’s been making those funny noises all day.” I explained to them that only once in a while was normal and that they should be a ‘tad more concerned’ (I was being very sarcastic, of course). I went out into the hall to speak with the nurse, who informed me that Mom had been complaining of pain in her right hip, so they gave her (insert name of a narcotic pain pill here). I shook my head ‘no’, and told the nurse that the only pain reliever her doctor had ever approved was regular-strength Tylenol. Narcotic pain pills suppress the breathing too much in people with COPD. She said that’s what the doctor had ordered. Turns out it wasn’t her doctor, but the doctor on call.

Symbol for No SmokingTuesday morning at 6:30 a.m., the phone rings. Mom’s eyes were open, but she was non-responsive. By the time my brother and I reached the hospital she was already gone. To have to see her laying on that gurney just about killed me. I honest to god don’t think I’m going to get through this. I am beyond furious that these companies can literally get away with murder. Nobody you love should have to die the way my mother did. I did everything in my power to make her well. I failed. I don’t think I can live with that, especially since I’m about to lose our house and everything my family ever owned. I am terrified out of my wits. Sorry this is so long…I just needed to talk. There’s so much that I left out of this…so much more. Never have I known a hell like what we had to go through. It just isn’t right.

It is our hopes that you will pass on this article on to others who are enticed to smoke, or your loved ones who do. Sometimes a wake up call like this true story can make a huge difference.

New Zealand, Clearly Becoming Smoke-Free

If you want to stop smoking then pack your bag and fly over to New Zealand.

While you are there New Zealand tobacco regulatory agencies will offer you the facts on smoking dangers and by 2017 you may have to leave the country to buy tobacco products.

New Zealand is one of the many countries incorporating smoking bans, and like Canada they are banning smoking in your car.

Under the Influence While Driving

In New Zealand now you could be fined for smoking while driving in your car.

If you are a cigarette smoker you may be asking, “Do they fine people if they are not driving, but just sitting by the side of the road with the car ignition off?”

Or you might even ask, “Is there a smoking airbag that will explode if I am smoking in my car?”

Seriously, it does matter if you smoke while driving. You are polluting the air around you with second hand smoke. Windows up, windows down; it doesn’t matter.

Passengers who are riding with you including young children are also subject to your second hand smoke that could lead to potential harm, like contributing to asthma and other bronchial ailments.

It’s a Matter of Respecting Others


Young children are more at risk for these ailment because their lungs, like the rest of their bodies are still in the development stage.

The casual cigarette puff near a crib where an infant may be sleeping has been known to result in Sudden Death Syndrome. Children’s lungs actually take in more air because they breathe faster. They are unable to turn away from the smoke and of course infants do not know how harmful the smoke from tobacco is or even what it is.

A child who is around an adult smoker might draw closer to the lite cigarette because it is something new and their curious minds want to investigate. They do not know any better.

Adults may not want to smell your second hand smoke either. Many people are polite and will tolerate the fumes when they accompany you walking, driving or riding in a car.

Also, think about it. Many friends will endure second hand smoke before offending you. You might ask how you will feel if in time they suddenly fall victim of an unexplained bronchial infection, cancer, and other ailments that are known to be smoker related.

New Zealand’s Stop Regulations and Initiative

If we take the initiative and see what’s working for the people of New Zealand, (we are not saying they are doing everything right) we might learn something. Their smoking rates are considerably lower than those in other countries, including the US.

Why not concentrate on more aggressive efforts to teach our kids not to smoke. How about becoming a good example by not smoking nor exposing our children to friends who still smoke. These three actions would be a good start.

Paying higher premiums for healthcare services could also be a major game changer to help smokers quit.

New Zealand is on the right track to help smoking statistics drop in their country, which will in turn improve the quality of life for everyone. In fact, on September 5th,  2007, Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) in New Zealand called for the removal of tobacco from sale by 2017.

Smoking Related Fires: Unattended Smoking Materials Attribute to Natural Disasters, Civilian Deaths, and Injury Each Year

Smoking does not just cause health problems.

There are other cigarette dangers that go beyond the the obvious. They are a known fire hazard as well.

Fires caused by cigarette smoking are disastrous because an unattended cigarette can destroy an unknown number of lives directly and indirectly … and in an instant.

Statistics on Fires Related to Cigarette Smoking

Smoking accounts for more than 23,000 residential fires in a year nationwide. That’s why some insurance companies offer to reduce premiums if all the residents in the house do not smoke.

Insurance breaks for households where the occupants don’t smoke is probably one of the major reasons why smoking is no longer allowed inside or on the grounds of most work places hotels, restaurants, and pubs.

Unattended Cigarettes Cause Natural DisastersFACT: Smoking materials (i.e., cigarettes, cigars, pipes, etc.) are the leading cause of fire deaths in the United States. Roughly one of every four fire deaths in 2007 was attributed to smoking materials.

In 2007, there were an estimated 140,700 smoking-material fires in the United States. These fires caused 720 civilian deaths and 1,580 civilian injuries.

More fatal smoking-material fires start in bedrooms than in living rooms, family rooms and dens.

Older adults are at the highest risk of death or injury from smoking-material fires even though they are less likely to smoke than younger adults.

The most common items first ignited in home smoking-material fire deaths were upholstered furniture, mattresses and bedding.

Worldwide the loss of material goods and real estate is in the billions of dollars.

Who Do Fires Caused by Cigarette Smoking Hurt the Most?

Young children are the most vulnerable because their inquisitiveness and thirst for knowledge make them easy targets for experimentation with things they do not quite understand.

Toddlers crawl from pillar to post putting things in their mouths like lighters, cigarettes (new and used) and pipes. They are only imitating what they see their adult mentors do on a daily basis.

And while your impression is that the toddler will not be able to light that cigarette — smoke that pipe — or knock over that ashtray — while you are out of the room, major fire disasters can erupt. For example: You are in the kitchen cooking dinner while you think little Johnny is in his bed taking nap and…

Injury to Adults and Seniors

Adults to seniors, although on the opposite end of the spectrum of young children, fair no better because they can get careless and nod off to sleep, dropping that lit cigarette on a mattress, sofa, or carpet.  Smoke inhalation is such a powerful thing that it can keep you asleep longer and deeper than that well known brand of sleeping pill.

The Other Loss

We must also mention those who are left grieving for their lost loved one. We must also mention the family that survived the fire is left behind to grieve for the loved ones they lost. They’re still trying to understand how something so small as a cigarette could have caused so much damage.

And then there is the neighbor, tired after a 10 hour work day.  She arrives home while on the way thinking about a nice hot bath and a good night’s sleep to learn that she is suddenly homeless. The cigarette smoker next door may have caused a fire that consumed everything she owned other than the clothes on her back and the shoes on her feet.

Consider the Risk, Consider the Disaster

Cigarettes are the number one cause of house fire fatalities. And we haven’t even mentioned outdoor fires causes by careless smokers.

Fires caused by cigarettes result in around eight-hundred plus deaths each year. These fires usually occur when a smoker falls asleep without extinguishing a cigarette.

House fires from unattended cigarettes generally occurs at night, when the whole family is asleep, which can make it difficult for everyone to evacuate in time.

If you or another family member has a tobacco habit, make sure that no one ever smokes in bed.

As of March 2010, all 50 US states passed legislation and achieved their goal in getting cigarette manufacturers to produce only cigarettes that adhere to an established safety performance standard.

If you do smoke think about others. Stay alert and only smoke outside away from non smokers (and dispose of the butts properly). It is better for your family’s health and this one action will reduce the risk of a house fire.

Or better yet, don’t smoke at all and relieve everyone around you from an unnecessary potential disaster.

Global Cancer Deaths to Hit 17 Million in 2030

Barcelona – Cancer deaths will more than double to 17 million people each year in 2030 with poor countries shouldering the heaviest burden from the disease, the head of the UN’s cancer agency said on Monday.

An aging population will bump up cancer rates worldwide in the coming years, especially in developing countries where the number of people who smoke and drink is on the rise, said Peter Boyle, director of the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

And the disease will hit poorer countries harder because of limited health budgets and a lack of treatments such as radiotherapy that can extend people’s lives, he told the European Cancer Conference. “If we put population growth and aging to one side the exportation of cancer risk factors, primarily tobacco smoking, from developed countries will continue to be a major determinant of cancer risk and cancer burden in less developed countries,” he said.

Smoke Drink Watch TVFor many years, many thought cancer was mainly a problem in rich nations in part because health officials assumed people in poorer countries did not live long enough to develop cancer. This trend is changing, however, as residents of these nations live longer and continue cancer-causing activities like smoking that are declining in Western countries, Boyle said.

This will fuel a dramatic increase in worldwide cancer with the disease likely killing 17 million people each year by 2030, up from the current 7 million. The number of people diagnosed and living with cancer will treble to 75 million, he said. “The big issue is aging,” he said. “The speed of the aging of the population is something which is dramatically increasing, especially in the low and medium resource countries.”

But he said Europe offers an example that something can be done because even as cancer cases rise, the disease is killing fewer people these days than expected. This shows that programs such as increased screening and education aimed at preventing tobacco use helped whittle EU cancer deaths to 935,219 in 2000, nearly 10% below expectations.

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Lauren Terrazzano, 39, Wrote About Having Cancer

Garden City, N.Y.- Lauren Terrazzano, a Newsday reporter who chronicled her three-year bout with lung cancer, has died. She was only 39.

Terrazzano died Tuesday night at Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan.

Newsday staffers learned of her death Wednesday in a letter from editor John Mancini.

“She was well-loved by her many friends and colleagues in the newsroom and a formidable presence in the lives of the people in the communities she covered,” Mancini said.

Described by colleagues as a tenacious, hard-nosed street reporter, Terrazzano covered a variety of beats, most recently as a child welfare/social services reporter. She began writing the column, “Life, With Cancer,” in October 2006.

She wrote about the inappropriate things people say to cancer patients because they don’t know what else to say, and about breaking the myth that people with cancer are heroes “when really we’re just like everyone else.”

“My goal was to tackle the taboo subjects of the disease that the mainstream media often fails to do,” she told the Associated Press. “We so often cover the news aspects of cancer: the scientific breakthrough or even the sob story, yet there are so many other avenues that go unexplored.”

Terrazzano had smoked off-and-on for about five years before her September 2004 cancer diagnosis, rarely enough that she said her oncologists considered her a nonsmoker.

About 20 percent of women diagnosed with lung cancer are not smokers but are exposed to secondhand smoke within their communities.

Terrazzano’s column won praise from other cancer patients as well as professional honors.

She won the top prize in the science/health reporting category of a contest run by the Silurians, the oldest press club in the United States.

“Lauren did not go quietly,” Mancini said.

Source: wire reports

Patrick Barkey: Smoking and the Economy

For those who have gone through life shying away from anything involving numbers, the demonstration of the principle of compound interest is usually an eye-opening revelation.

It’s quite simply, actually. Money set aside today accrues interest, if it is wisely invested. But so does the interest on what you set aside yesterday. Over a longtime span, this snowballing of interest on interest can build up to a sizable nest egg.

That’s why financial advisors always tell you to start saving for retirement while you are younger, even if the amounts you set aside are fairly small. It is also why tax policies that make investment income from retirement savings tax exempt can have such a powerful impact on wealth, even if the income you draw from those plans later in life is fully taxed.

It’s a story about numbers, so it takes a few to explain it. If you are in a 25-percent tax bracket, and set $100 dollars of your after-tax wages aside each month, after 40 years you would have about $134,000 in savings to spend as you wished. But if you saved with pre-tax dollars, in a tax-exempt account, your nest egg would be almost double that size, more than $265,000. Even after paying taxes on the income you draw out, you’d be well ahead.

Picture of Dollar Signs
But the Relevance of the story of compounding is not limited to financial planning. The same phenomenon helps explain why Indiana’s dubious status as a state where people smoke more than average exacts such a heavy toll on productivity and output in the state’s economy.

If that sounds like a stretch, consider the following. We know that smoking and premature retirement and death because of smoking-related illnesses are closely linked. Formally speaking, we might say that the survival rate for a smoker of any age — the probability that they will remain alive until next year — is lower than that of a non-smoker.

In fact, the voluminous research that has been conducted on smoking and health has given us some fairly accurate estimates of these rates, which must take into account other factors affecting health, like weight and exercise habits, which may also vary between those who smoke and those who do not. And the differences in these survival rates, while small, can have an enormous impact on the workforce and the population, through the process of compounding.

Let’s take the optimistic scenario first. If we could wave a magic wand and turn our state’s population into people who had never smoked, we’d all enjoy higher survival rates. As a result, there would be more of us in every age category next year at this time. Applying higher survival rates to that larger group yields yet a larger increase each successive year.

Compounding forward into the future, we can see that a small change in survivability accumulates to much more significant increase in population over time. Many of those who would be added would be in the prime of their working lives.

Now it is back to reality. Indiana is a heavier-than-average smoking state. We pay the price for that in the form of lower, not higher, survival rates. And the compounded impact of that unfortunate fact over the decades of time that have already elapsed is that we have lost many workers and consumers throughout the economy.

That’s not the only way in which smoking impacts the economy, of course. But as we discuss whether or not smokers take more breaks, get sick more often, or require more cleaning up after than non-smokers, we should remember that the largest impact of them all may be the one we don’t see. That is the folks who are no longer with us.

Patrick M. Barkey is director of economic and policy studies at Ball State University’s Miller College of Business.

Allen Carr Dies From Lung Cancer

Allen Carr who founded The Easyway in 1983, died of lung cancer today.

Mr. Carr’s main objective in life was to “Cure the World of Smoking.”

Scandal”™ is the book that the pharmaceuticals, the Department of Health, the NHS, ASH and QUIT will not want you to read!

Excerpt from Scandal: “The truth is that we’ve failed even to prevent our children and grand-children from falling into the trap. Those same youngsters who were desperately trying to persuade their parents to quit are now puffing away as if it never went out of fashion!”

Allen’s final book Scandal’ is free, in PDF form.

Picture of Allen CarrSmoking killed my father in his mid-fifties and my sister in her mid-forties.

Once the brainwashing, illusions and cobwebs have been removed. I believe the word devastation is an apt description of the drug nicotine. Please Help Me To Remove This Evil
–End of Excerpt

Ruairi O’Connor, of the British Heart Foundation, said: “Estimates of the huge numbers of people helped by Allen Carr’s programs show his methods provided a valuable service to help people quit.

“We hope that his memory will continue to inspire people in their efforts to give up smoking.”

Allen Carr, thanks for all you have done to get the message out to the world.

Your presence will be sadly missed in the war against Big Tobacco.

Click to learn more The Easyway

Over The Bridge and Through the Woods

To big tobacco’s house we go?

Quitting smoking involves a major life change and does strange things to the human psyche.

We can convince ourselves of almost anything if we truly grasp onto a belief in our minds.

Thinking that you cannot quit smoking is one such belief that will literally kill you!

As a very young child, I thought that I would never be able to tie my shoes. Mother always tied them for me without taking the time to teach me how.

I vaguely remember sitting in my room practicing how to tie with tears streaming down my cheeks. Having little or no instruction with a new process often makes it difficult to accomplish the process at one sitting.

Green River Timber Crib DamThroughout our lives, we try on new learning experiences.

When we graduate high school, we enter either college or the work force. When we get married, we learn how to work an intimate relationship or how to dump our partner in a divorce. Before we start a business, we learn how to write a business plan.

The process of quitting smoking is a learning experience too! You cannot simply quit smoking after twenty years and not take into consideration that there may be some physical, mental, and emotional discomforts (quit smoking baggage.)

If you anticipate that quitting is a painful process, this idea will ignite a desire to flee (smoke) or stay and fight (remain quit.)

Ideas first spark in the mind. Once an idea ignites, you can toss it in the trunk or become a driver and steer the vehicle. The ideas in your mind can also be like passengers or the driver in a car. You have a driver who is in charge of getting the car and passengers to a destination.

You have passengers who anticipate that the driver and the car will get them to a destination. The passengers are always dependent upon the driver and the vehicle. The driver is always dependent upon the vehicle.

Once you realize that you are the only one who can make the choice to steer your thoughts away from the destination of big tobacco, you will learn to embrace a new sense of freedom and power over crave thoughts. Remember that big tobacco wants you to think that you need their product in order to live life to the fullest.

Have you ever wondered why Philip Morris USA supports a single, consistent public health message on the role of cigarette smoking in the development of disease in smoker’s yet they continue to peddle death and disease?

Cigarette companies spend millions of dollars each year on marketing and research alone. Big tobacco wants lifetime consumers and they know that in order to train a child in the way they should go, that they have to begin this process of subtle advertising by consistently innovating new ways to market their product to our youth.

In the United States, smoking-related illnesses account for more than 440,000 deaths each year. Please do not allow big tobacco to manipulate and control how long you live.

Life in itself is precious. Take back your lives from big tobacco and do it now, before it is too late.

Peripheral Arterial Disease and Smoking

“About 80% of the patients whose legs or extremities I have to amputate are current smokers. If they are not current smokers, then they almost certainly used to smoke.

If patients presenting with PAD have never smoked, I have cause to doubt whether they have the disease at all.” -Mr. Daryll Baker, Consultant vascular surgeon, Royal Free Hospital.

The most common cause of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is atherosclerosis. In atherosclerosis, fatty deposits (plaques) build up in your artery walls and reduce blood flow.

PAD mimics a condition similar to coronary artery disease and carotid artery disease where fatty deposits build up in the inner linings of the artery walls.

These blockages restrict blood circulation, mainly in arteries leading to the kidneys, stomach, arms, legs, and feet.

Book Cover of Peripheral Arterial DiseaseRobert S. Schwartz, MD states: “Atherosclerosis and PAD is pretty much the same thing. Atherosclerosis is the hardening of the arteries.

It’s the plaque that builds up; it’s the calcium, the fats, the fibrous tissue, the scarring that grows into the arteries and stops the blood from flowing into the legs.”

In the UK, about 2.7 million people age 55 or older, have some degree of peripheral arterial disease and almost 8-12 million people in the United States who have this disease are unaware of having this condition.

PAD is often silent for a very long time before you will notice any symptoms. Some Symptoms of PAD may include:

  1. Foot pain that does not go away when you stop exercising
  2. Cold and numb feet or toes
  3. Leg numbness or weakness
  4. A change in the color of your legs
  5. Decreased leg strength, function, and poor balance
  6. Experiencing discomfort within the muscles of the calves or the thighs, or the buttocks may be indicative of claudication (PAD leg pain occurs in the muscles, not the joints)
  7. Hair loss on your feet and legs
  8. Changes in your nails
  9. Foot pain at rest, which indicates that PAD is getting worse
  10. Foot or toe wounds that will not heal or heal very slowly
  11. Erectile dysfunction
  12. Gangrene

*Symptoms of peripheral vascular disease depend on what artery is affected and how severely the blood flow is reduced.

One of the serious sub effects of peripheral vascular disease is Buerger’s disease (thromboangiitis obliterans). It is characterized by a combination of inflammation and clots in the arteries and veins that obstruct blood flow.

Brandon Carmichael is a young man who has suffered this disease to an extreme, having had his left leg amputated below the knee from smoking.

The risk of peripheral vascular disease is dramatically increased in smokers. When a person stops smoking, regardless of how much he or she may have smoked in the past, their risk of peripheral vascular disease rapidly declines.

In a Health Briefing on Silent Epidemic, Peripheral Arterial Disease article Alan T. Hirsch, MD, Chair, P.A.D. Coalition states, “Peripheral arterial disease is the most dangerous disease that most Americans have never heard of”.

The same article continues with the following warning: “People with peripheral arterial disease – P.A.D. – have up to a six-fold increase in cardiovascular death. Without early detection and proper treatment, one in four people with P.A.D. will suffer a heart attack, stroke, amputation or die within the next five years.”

If you add a bad diet and a sedentary lifestyle into this equation, you probably have a prescription to die much younger. How many smokers with Peripheral Arterial Disease have died of a heart attack or stroke where the connection to smoking as a risk factor fell silent?

An absence of a pulse in your legs or arms should immediately alert your health care provider to seek further testing for Peripheral Arterial Disease. eMedicineHealth has an excellent article on Exams and Tests regarding Peripheral Arterial Disease. It is very important that you consult with your health care provider if you believe that you are at risk for this disease.

Are you a smoker? If you are a smoker the most important thing you can do for your health is to educate yourself about smoking-related diseases. If you are an ex-smoker, you also need to stay abreast of learning about smoking-related diseases. Knowledge is power!


References:

Just Don’t Smoke!

At 2.6 years quit I rarely think of smoking anymore.

If I do entertain the concept of smoking I almost always cancel out the thought instantly.

The most important aspect of the quit process is to become educated about what smoking does to the human body.

As a young quit I forced myself to watch a Lung Bronchoscopy of a patient with lung cancer.

He was a 57 year old man who had a 75 pack year history, with carcinoma in the upper portion of his right lung. Or for those who think that you have a lifetime before you have to quit smoking, check out Brandon Carmichael.

In hospital settings I’ve watched patients struggle with oxygen tanks and gasp to catch even one breath. I have also stood helpless as a lung cancer patient coughed up bloody phlegm while choking on his own body fluids.

I’ve listened to the whistling and wheezing while calculating the buildup of bluish discoloration of oxygen starved faces and clubbed fingers. How much longer will they or you suffer from smoking-related diseases, gasping for the air that that is essential to every human in order to survive?

Hand Holding CigarettesReplacing wispy shrouds of romanticized longings for the daily cigarette ebbed; craves were slowly replaced over time with alpha iron armor structured in smoking-related disease research.

I began to see myself as a female combatant who existed in a world that was torn between personal inalienable rights and too much governmental control. I also learned that life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness could not be achieved at the cost of human addiction.

Somewhere a line has to be drawn. Should we give the unborn, babies, toddlers, children, and nonsmokers who live on our planet the right to live and breathe in both private and public air space? Or should we simply delegate the right for smokers to pollute our air space and subject everyone to second-hand smoke?

In 2006 the Surgeon General released a new report on secondhand smoke, which stated that there is no safe level of exposure to the more than 4,000 chemicals, including 11 known human carcinogens in secondhand smoke.

The World Health Organization States:

Tobacco is the second major cause of death in the world. It is currently responsible for the death of one in ten adults worldwide (about 5 million deaths each year).

If current smoking patterns continue, it will cause some 10 million deaths each year by 2020. Half the people that smoke today -that is about 650 million people- will eventually be killed by tobacco.

If you choose to smoke, your smoke is a toxic air contaminant. Be kind to yourself, other people, and to our planet. Just don’t smoke.