Tag Archives: smoking cigarettes

Kick Your Smoking Habit in 38 Minutes and 13 Seconds

Quit Smoking Today has quite a promising guarantee.

This stop smoking program was created to help smokers stop now by Rob Mellor.

In his program Mellor reports the smoker can kick the habit in just 38 minutes and 13 seconds, in fact he guarantees it.

Mellor’s philosophy is based on the theory that the number one reason people smoke is to attempt to relieve stress.

He contends that smoking is only an illusion at stress relief and with real stress relief tools in place the smoker will no longer turn to cigarettes to relieve stresses. This illusion is deep seeded in the unconscious of the smoker and with the proper tools can be changed.

Discover the Number One Reason People Smoke

For instance, people become stressed when they are under pressure to reach a set deadline whether it is at work or in a personal situation.

A deadline approaches, the work is not completed and stress builds. So the smoker heads outside for a smoke to relieve the stress.

Mellor reminds the smoker that in doing this the work is still not completed, the deadline continues to loom, and the stress is still there.

The basis of this is that smoking doesn’t relieve stress. Learning how to reduce and effectively deal with stress is the solution that will stop smokers from picking up that deadly cancer stick.

This program guarantees it can overcome this habit.

Stop the Cravings, Don’t Rely on Willpower

In his program, Quit Smoking Today, Mellor promises that in 40 minutes you’ll gain the tools to deal appropriately with stress so you choose not to smoke. He says the smoker who tries to quit using his program will not experience cravings, or need to spend money on nicotine replacement therapies or other drugs.

He also promises his prospects that they won’t have anxiety, weight gain, suffer the sense of loss, need to use will power, or even have to set a quit date.

Mellor knows this program will work because he draws on his NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming) experience.

Change Your Thinking to Change Your Life

Neuro-Linguistic Programming is a type of psychotherapy that enables people to change their thinking to change their lives.

Thoughts that become part of our unconscious thinking from years ago still play into our decision making.

Many of these beliefs are incorrect, even dangerous for us and desperately need to be ‘reprogrammed.’ Mellor puts on the 40 minute recordings what he’s used with thousands of smokers to help them quit – for good.

Quit Smoking Today – Tested on 5,000 Smokers

pic-stop-nowHe’s tested this recording on over 5,000 smokers who wanted to quit.

You may not believe what you are about to read!

The quit results were a remarkable 99.7% stop smoking success rate for the period of one month, and 97.2% success rate in a six month period.

Along with the recording (which is backed by a 100% money back guarantee) you get five free bonuses:

  1. Quit smoking eBook
  2. Recorded stop smoking therapy session
  3. Stress relieving audio program
  4. Set of weight loss and health tips
  5. 97 Ways to Get Fit and Stay Fit.

The Quit Smoking Today program (plus 5 bonuses) is sold for $47.

Money back guarantee is for 60 days!

This quit smoking program really makes sense. Learn more if you’re a smoker and want to quit you can discover new ways to cope with stress rather than replace a habit with more nicotine (patches or gum) and continue to crave a cigarette.

Turn learn more or order, click  > Quit Smoking Today!

Thanks, Tobacco: You Killed My Mom

I just discovered this video by AARON SHAWN GRAY (known as sonicbondage) on You Tube this evening.

This is the story of a mother who went in for medical tests and was diagnosed with Stage IV Lung Cancer. It gives you insight into what a family goes through when someone is lost to lung cancer.

Her son Shawn created this video to honor his Mom’s last wishes to tell people not to smoke and to assist him through the grieving process. Let it inspire you to take the steps that you need to take to stop smoking once and for all.

It is important to see how what you are doing right now may impact not only your life but the lives of all those who love you:

YouTube.com Description:

This video was created over a one-year period. At first, it was just random use of a video camera, plus a few pictures taken during a visit in September of 2006. Of course, this was before we knew that Mom had a collapsed lung. She went in for tests, and it was discovered that she had Stage IV Lung Cancer.

As we learned of the cancer diagnosis in October of 2006, we tried to get Mom down to California (from Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada). It was a race against logistics and paperwork (i.e. obtaining documentation in order to cross a border and travel), which we unfortunately lost. Mom suffered a stroke, ironically on the same day as she received her birth certificate, which would have allowed her to travel to Southern California. The stroke left her left side completely paralyzed, and she was stuck in the hospital, no longer the independent woman she once was. We were summoned to fly up immediately, as we were told by her doctors that her death would not be far behind.

Mom proved them all wrong, and lived for four more months. Of course, the quality of life was minimal at best. There was no treatment, since the cancer was discovered so late, and due to the stroke. We have since learned that often times, a biopsy can knock loose cancerous material within a tumor, which can cause a stroke. It was extremely difficult to watch her suffering in a hospital bed, and wondering why her last months had to be made that much worse due to the stroke. So, Mom never did get to come see where we live in California.

We continued to videotape the entire ordeal, so that family (who couldn’t be with us at that time) could see everything. We ended up with approximately 90 minutes of raw footage, which has been edited down to the 10 minutes allowed here.

First, we have done this to honor Mom’s last wishes: tell people not to smoke.

Second, we have completed this very emotional project to honor her memory, and to help us as we continue through the grieving process.

Finally, we are aware that much of the anti-smoking media is not so real to life–it doesn’t show the suffering, what the families go through, and the pain that cigarettes actually cause. This documentary is “non-Hollywood”. We have omitted certain things that one might find offensive, including her IV, vomiting, bodily functions, and her actual death itself, which was obviously painful. Instead, we have brought many different segments together, which still conveys our overall message: DON’T SMOKE!

In a letter dated September 24, 2006, from Mom:

Try not to worry about my health. I go for a CAT-SCAN on October 4th. I should have the results about a week later. The appointments are taking a long time, so I must not be in such dire shape, or they would rush them. I’m glad you never really had the desire to smoke. What do your lungs look like after all of those years of second-hand smoke? I can’t wait to see you and Patti more often. Gotta go for now. Love Forever, Mom

To conclude, one can compare smoking cigarettes to a slow-motion car accident. At any time, you can get out of the car before it crashes. It is your choice. Furthermore, you may be driving your own car, but please remember that you take passengers along for the ride.

Chantix Helps Smokers Quit

MARTINSBURG, W.Va. – The first time Brian Kelly quit smoking, in the 1990s, he had nicotine cravings like crazy even though he was using a nicotine patch and nicotine gum.

This year when Kelly decided again to try to kick the habit he returned to the patch and gum, until he read on the Internet about Chantix, a prescription anti-smoking pill approved a year ago by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“It’s like a wonder drug as far as I’m concerned,” said Kelly, 63, of Martinsburg.

Kelly said he quit smoking in three weeks – a date he set through a quit-smoking class at Waynesboro Hospital in Pennsylvania – and didn’t face the withdrawal symptoms that occurred the first time he quit.

Chantix, made by Pfizer, blocks the nicotine receptors in the brain so people don’t get a buzz from smoking, nor do they suffer withdrawal symptoms when they stop smoking, said Dr. Paul Quesenberry, a family doctor with Cumberland Valley Family Physicians in Chambersburg, Pa.

“It’s been a really amazing addition to our regimen for getting people to stop smoking,” Quesenberry said.

Still, it’s not an immediate fix.

How long it takes to stop smoking with Chantix varies from patient to patient, but usually it takes weeks to months because people have to learn to break the habit as well, Quesenberry said.

According to Pfizer’s Web site, smokers should start taking Chantix one week before their quit-smoking date so the drug can build up in the body. They can keep smoking during that first week.

Dr. Dwight Wooster, a pulmonologist with Newman, Wooster, Kass, Bradford, McCormack & Hurwitz at Robinwood Medical Center, said he recommends his patients try to reduce how much they smoke before they start Chantix. Of the 22 patients for whom he has prescribed Chantix, about 17 already have quit smoking.

Most people take Chantix for up to 12 weeks, according to Pfizer.

The most common side effects include gastrointestinal problems such as nausea and constipation, and difficulty sleeping, doctors said.

Quesenberry said most people he’s prescribed Chantix to haven’t had problems with side effects.

Most people who experience side effects will tolerate them because the benefit of quitting smoking is so huge, he said.

Dr. Sanjay Saxena, a family doctor with Hagerstown Family Medicine, said he’s had patients ask about Chantix, whether they’ve tried other smoking cessation tools or not, because they’ve heard how successful the drug has been for others.

Health benefits

Kelly began smoking at age 7 when he was living in Brooklyn, N.Y., because it was a tough neighborhood and smoking was cool.

When he quit the first time, Kelly had been smoking as many as 4 1/2 packs a day.

He began smoking again around 2001 after several deaths in his family and got up to a pack and a half a day.

Since he quit with Chantix, Kelly feels terrific, he said.

His breathing has improved, and he no longer has a smoker’s cough.

The carbon monoxide that gets into the bloodstream from smoking can lead to heart disease and strokes, Quesenberry said.

Smoking also can lead to chronic lung diseases such as emphysema and cancers, including lung, mouth, esophagus, and cervical and bladder cancers, he said.

Lesa Spedden, 32, of Chambersburg, Pa., took Chantix to quit smoking so she would have more energy and to be an example for her children.

“I don’t want to be a hypocrite and say, ‘Now, you can’t do this.’ Meanwhile, I’m there huffing and puffing in front of them,” Spedden said.

Spedden said she truly enjoyed smoking and wanted something to help her not enjoy the habit. Chantix helped curb that desire. After taking the drug a few days, smoking cigarettes developed an unpleasant, bitter taste, she said.

Smoking didn’t appeal to her anymore.

The most immediate benefit is getting rid of the expense of smoking, Quesenberry said.

Chantix can be pricey and sometimes health insurance doesn’t cover it, but the flip side is the expense of cigarettes, Quesenberry said.

A one-month supply – a 1-milligram Chantix pill per day – would cost $60 to $65 without insurance coverage, said David Russo, pharmacist and owner of Russo’s Rx in Hagerstown.

Other options

Other options for smokers wanting to quit include the nicotine patch, nicotine gum, nicotine inhaler and the anti-smoking drug Zyban.

Saxena said Chantix has been more successful than other treatments, but there’s still a place for those other treatments. He’s had at least one patient who experienced bad nausea with Chantix.

For that person, he might recommend the nicotine inhaler, which gives smokers nicotine as well as something to do with their hands rather than handle a cigarette or turn to more food as a substitution.

Quesenberry said he typically hasn’t recommended the nicotine patch because it causes skin irritation, and smokers usually don’t like it because it doesn’t deliver that quick nicotine buzz as a cigarette does. Instead, the patch provides a slow release of nicotine.

While the taste of nicotine gum isn’t pleasant, it does a better job of providing a nicotine buzz, like a cigarette, he said.

Quesenberry said he would prescribe Zyban for smokers with significant co-existing anxiety or depression because the pill is actually an anti-anxiety medicine, marketed for the latter purpose as Wellbutrin. The drug, generically known as bupropion, was approved by the FDA in May 1997 as an anti-smoking medication and marketed under the name Zyban.

If someone specifically asked for Zyban because they knew someone who quit with it, Quesenberry would prescribe the person that drug, he said.

Wanting to quit is a big factor in succeeding quitting, local doctors said.

Quesenberry said he won’t prescribe Zyban or Chantix for smokers who don’t want to quit but say they want an anti-smoking drug because a family member wants them to quit, because they have to want to quit themselves.

A bit of psychology is involved, he said.

“Once it’s in the heart and they want to do it, it doesn’t take much. It’s getting people to where they’re ready to stop that’s the big deal sometimes,” Quesenberry said.

“If you’re not motivated, no medication is going to work,” Wooster said.

For more information about Chantix, check out this Web site:

U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s patient information sheet for Chantix: www.fda.gov/cder/drug/InfoSheets/patient/vareniclinePIS.htm.

Source: JULIE E. GREENE, The Herald-Mail Company