Tag Archives: smoking and lung health

Smoking Cigarettes Effects on Lung Health

Every time you inhale smoke from a cigarette, you kill some of the alveoli, or the air sacks in your lungs.

These air sacks are where the oxygen that you breathe in is transferred into your blood.

The alveoli will not grow back.

So if you destroy them, you permanently have destroyed part of your lungs.

Alveoli Lung Air Sacks ImageSmoking paralyzes the cilia that line your lungs.

Cilia are little hair like structures that move back and forth to sweep particles out of your lungs. When you smoke, the cilia can not move and can not do their job.

So dust, pollen, and other things that you inhale they sit in your lungs and build up.

Also, there are a lot of particles in smoke that get into your lungs. Since your cilia are paralyzed because of the smoke and can not clean them out, the particles sit in your lungs and form tar.

Tobacco Smoke Effects Moves From the Lungs to the Kidneys

“Some of the carcinogens (cancer-causing chemicals) in tobacco smoke are absorbed from the lungs and get into the blood.

From the blood, they are filtered by the kidneys and concentrated in the urine.” ~~ Dr Visal A Khan

Smoking is systemic, and the chemicals in tobacco do not stop effecting your body until after quitting smoking your immune system has a chance to restore your health.

“A cigarette is a euphemism for a cleverly crafted product that delivers just the right amount of nicotine to keep its user addicted for life before killing the person.”
~WHO

How Your Lungs Work

You breathe in and out anywhere from 15 to 25 times per minute,

Without even thinking about it.

When you exercise, your breathing rate goes up — again, without you thinking about it.

You breathe so regularly that it is easy to take your lungs for granted.

You can’t even stop yourself from breathing if you try!

Smoker’s Lung Pathology Photo Essay

This photo essay will focus on smoker’s lung. The term “smoker’s lung” refers to the structural and functional abnormalities (diseases) in the lung caused by cigarette smoking.

First, the normal structure and function of the lung will be described and illustrated. Then, the structural and functional abnormalities caused by smoking. will be described and illustrated.

http://www.medicinenet.com/smokers_lung_pathology_photo_essay/article…

All About Smoking (ALA)

http://www.lungusa.org/site/pp.asp?c=dvLUK9O0E&b=22938

Contains the following topics of interest:

  • Smoking Fact Sheet
  • Data and Statistics
  • Secondhand Smoke Fact Sheet
  • Secondhand Smoke and Children Fact Sheet
  • Secondhand Smoke and Your Family
  • Cigar Smoking Fact Sheet
  • International Tobacco Use Fact Sheet
  • Smoking Among Older Adults Fact Sheet
  • Image Comparison of Healthy Lung to Lung with Emphysema
  • Smoking Policies in the Workplace Fact Sheet
  • Tobacco-Free Schools Fact Sheet
  • Tobacco Product Advertising and Promotion Fact Sheet

How Smoking Hurts Your Lungs

Smoking damages your lungs natural cleaning and repair system and traps cancer-causing chemicals in your lungs.

Picture of LungsSmoking destroys the tiny hairs (cilia), which line the upper airways and protect against infection. Normally, there is a thin layer of mucous and thousands of these cilia lining the insides of your breathing tubes.

The mucous traps the little bits of dirt and pollution you breathe in, and the cilia move together like a wave to push the dirt-filled mucous out of your lungs. Then you cough, swallow, or spit up the mucous, and the dirt is out of your lungs.

When your lungs’ natural cleaning and repair system is damaged, germs, dirt and chemicals from cigarette smoke stay inside your lungs. This puts you at risk for chronic cough, chest infections, lung cancer and COPD.

View a Bronchoscopy in a Patient with Lung Cancer

The patient is a 57 year old, with a 75 pack year history of smoking, who was found to have a carcinoma in the upper portion of his right lung.

“The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing.” ~ John Powell

Click to learn How the Lung’s Work at HowStuffWorks.com