Tag Archives: smoking and cardiovascular disease

Tobacco Industry Lied About Second-Hand Smoke

Tobacco Industry Efforts Undermining Evidence Linking Secondhand Smoke With Cardiovascular Disease

Tobacco companies have funded nearly 50 studies on the link between secondhand smoke and heart disease

But when scientists found a connection, the industry skewed their conclusions or stopped funding them, report University of California researchers.

The researchers — Eliza Tong of UC Davis and UC San Francisco’s Stanton Glantz — analyzed 5,000 internal company documents uncovered by lawsuits.

Their findings, recently published in Circulation, are the first such review of the industry’s work on secondhand smoke and heart disease. Scientists agree that frequent exposure ups disease risk by 30 percent.

Ashtray Secondhand SmokeSurprisingly, the only major media outlet to pick this story up was the Sacramento Bee.

Have journalists become so cynical and novelty-consumed that we don’t even bother to tell the public when tobacco companies are once again caught in a cover up that, in ethical if not legal terms, is close to murder?

Sacramento Bee
Source: Brandon Keim, WiredScience

Smoking Kills Millions Of People Around The World

Not Succeeding is a failure only if you do not try to quit smoking again.

Results from the World Health Organisation (WHO) show that currently there are 1.3 billion smokers in the world.

The same data show that every 8 seconds somewhere in the world one person dies from the consequences of smoking. Smoking is the leading cause of premature deaths in the world.

Experts calculated that the number of deaths caused by smoking will increase by 10 million annually until 2020.

In Croatia, every third person is a smoker, of which 33.8% are men and 21.7% are women.

Smoking is often considered just a habit, but it is actually a much more serious problem.

Smoking is an addiction on three levels – psychological, emotional and physical.

The World Health Organization prepared an International Classification of Diseases which includes smoking addiction as a mental organic disorder.

How Does Nicotine Lead to Addiction?

Smoking ImagesNicotine has psychoactive effects.

It links to nicotine receptors in the brain, and in this way it increases the release of neurotransmitters, especially dopamine which gives a sense of pleasure. That’s why the majority of smokers feels satisfaction when smoking.

What are the Consequences of Smoking?

One of the most fatal results of smoking is lung carcinoma, of which one person dies every 30 seconds.

Around 90% in men and 80% in women of lung cancers are caused by smoking.

Smokers have 22 times greater possibilities of getting lung cancer that non-smokers.

More than 600,000 people die of cardiovascular illnesses that appear as a consequence of smoking every year.  Apart from that, smoking can damage sperm and skew DNA which can cause abortions or congenital deformations of the smokers’ descendants.

Also, sterility happens more often to smokers that non-smokers, because it reduces the number of sperm and the blood flow into the penis.

Making the Decision to Quit Smoking

The benefits of quitting smoking are huge and they are immediately visible. However, those who ask for expert advise have the best opportunity to stop smoking. Those who stop on their own, rarely manage to succeed in their intention, because it is an addiction that hits people emotionally, physically and psychologically.

Not Succeeding is a failure only if you do not try to quit smoking again – doctors say. That is why it is necessary not to give up. Seek support and beat the statistics before it’s to late.

Source: Antonija Zbiljski

NIH to Fund New Research Study Regarding Exposure to Cigarette Smoke

Smoking Research Studies Exposure to Cigarette Smoke

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania recently received a $2.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for a new study focusing on the chemical changes that occur when the body is exposed to cigarette smoke.

SmokePrevious research has shown that chemical changes in the body can occur after exposure to cigarette smoke and that smoking and exposure to cigarette smoke is the environmental exposure responsible for causing more deaths than any other toxins.

The chemical elements found in cigarette smoke can cause certain types of cancer and have been associated with cardiovascular, pulmonary and pancreatic diseases.

Smokers, non-smokers and even individuals who are in regular contact with secondhand smoke will be screened for the presence of distinctive lipid and DNA biological indicators or chemicals and through additional discovery potential protein indicators in their blood, urine and breath.

These indicators, also known as biomarkers or biochemicals, will be utilized to determine the susceptibility of individuals to tobacco-related lung and cardiovascular problems after exposure to cigarette smoke. The results will hopefully provide reliable data for use in subsequent studies.

“Only one in ten smokers get lung cancer, but the five-year survival rate after diagnosis is only 15 percent,” says Trevor M. Penning, PhD, Director of The Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology (CEET). “The question is, how can we intervene earlier to identify people most at risk. We aim to look at the interaction of genetic susceptibility to lung cancer and biomarkers of exposure to cigarette smoke. At the end of the day, if we study genetics and exposure together, we’ll hopefully have a very strong statement to say who is most at risk.”

Source: Brenda Fulmer, Claris Law
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Quit Smoking is the Way to Good Health

Cigarette smoking kills approximately 300,000 in the United States each year, and most of these people are seniors.

Lung cancer and emphysema are the best-known miserable outcomes.

However, accelerated development of atherosclerosis is the most important problem resulting from smoking.

This results in heart attacks and strokes, heart pains, leg pains, and many other problems. Pipe and cigar smoking do not have the pulmonary consequences that cigarette smoking does, but they do predispose to cancer of the lips, and tongue. Nicotine in any form has the same bad effects on the small blood vessels and thus accelerates development of atherosclerosis.

n.jpgIt is never too late to quit.

Only two years after stopping cigarette smoking, your risk of heart attack returns to average.

It has actually decreased substantially the very next day! After ten years your risk for lung cancer is back to nearly normal.

After only two years there is a decrease in lung cancer risk by perhaps one-third.

The development of emphysema is arrested for many people when they stop smoking, although this condition does not reverse. Seniors often feel that it is too late for changes in lifestyle to have beneficial effects on their health.

Not so. Most seniors have plenty of time to get major health benefits from quitting smoking. Remember that after age 65 men live an average of 15.4 more years and women 19.2 years. Chances of stroke and heart attack begin to go down immediately after you quit. Moreover, you will notice at once that your environment has become more friendly when you are not a smoker. Many of the daily hassles that impair the quality of your life go away when you stop offending others by this habit.

Many health educators are skeptical about cutting down slowly and stress that you need to stop completely. This may not always be true for seniors. For some people, rationing is a good way to get their smoking down to a much lower level, at which point it may be easier to stop entirely.

For example, the simple decision not to smoke in public can both help your health and decrease your daily hassles. To cut down, keep in the cigarette pack only those cigarettes you are going to allow yourself that day. Smoke the cigarettes only halfway down before extinguishing them.

There are many good stop-smoking courses offered through the American Cancer Society, the American Lung Association, and local hospitals. Most people won’t need these, but they can be of help. Try by yourself first. Then, if you still need help, get it.

Nicotine chewing gum or patches can help some people quit, and your doctor can give you a prescription and advice. Don’t plan on this as a long-term solution, since the nicotine in the gum or patch is just as bad for your arteries as the nicotine in cigarettes.

The challenge to stop smoking is an example of your ability to make your own choices if you are trapped by your addictions, even the lesser ones, you can’t make your own choices. Victory over smoking behaviors improves your mental health, in part because this is a difficult victory. It can open the door to success in other areas.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/health-articles/quit-smoking-is-the-way-to-good-health-220346.html

Risk of Contracting Heart Disease for Smokers

If you are a smoker, you may wonder what your risk is for developing heart disease.

Research has shown a person’s increased risk of contracting is directly proportional to the length of time that a person continues to smoke as well as the amount smoked.

So if you smoke one or two cigarettes a day, you are at risk. If you smoke a pack or two a day, your risk greatly increases.

Heart ImageHowever, if someone stops smoking, then these chances gradually decrease over time because the body has the ability to slowly repair the damage caused from smoking.

A year after quitting, the risk of contracting heart disease is half that of a continuing smoker. Other symptoms from smoking can also gradually heal.

Click to learn more about > Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Disease

~American Heart Association