Tag Archives: nicotine withdrawal

Training for a Quitter State of Mind

You are here reading this article because quitting cigarette smoking is a goal that you have set to achieve.

Just like a willing person has to train to run a marathon race, you can also train to quit and win the end of cigarettes fight.

Once you have truly made up you mind to quit you will quickly realize losing is not an option.

I Wonder What It Will be Like When…

A Thumbs Up AttitudeIf you are like many smokers who want to quit you have scanned the web for free tips, advice, and articles on ways to stop smoking and now you have a thumbs up attitude and you are ready to engage and receive support to help you quit for good.

This is the training part of the race to quit. During the training embrace a few of the quitting methods simultaneously  to help you find the best method that works for you.

One helpful tip is to close your eyes and slow down your thoughts while connecting to a peaceful place )like you would in a meditation practice) when the urge to light up is strongest. Imagine a future time where you have already quit smoking for good.  Notice how good you feel. Notice the way people support you and acknowledge your success.

The more you imagine the quitting finish line the sooner you will cross it.

Also spend some time thinking of some nice things you can do for yourself with the money you will save. Let this also be part of your meditation process. You can spend time imagining events, places, things, you can enjoy with the savings.

Drink Plenty of Water

Get use to drinking water. Notice when your mouth begins to feel dry and then drink a tall glass of water before you get really thirsty. Water helps to flush the nicotine and carcinogens out of your system quicker than if you drink it during and after you eat.  Soda and sweetened beverages only enhance and add to cigarette cravings.

If you find you worry that you may need something to do with your hands you can keep them busy by journaling what it is like to have a life as a non smoker. You can reflect on the past harm cigarettes did to you as a smoker, and document your healing progress.

Keep a journal handy when you feel the need to light up, and pour out all your feeling and thoughts without censoring them. This is your journal and no one needs to read what you write. You can write about how it feels when smoking urges arise, and how good it feels when your pass on the urge.

You can write about your progress each step of the way. You will often notice your first page or two often shares a few rants, by the third page you will be filled with inspiration as you move beyond your mind to your deeper inner resources. Journaling can help you stay sane, and also provide glimpses and eventually a deep bond with your inner courage and wisdom.

You Are Learning to Take Better Care of Yourself?

You can also find time to pamper yourself a little more.

Give yourself a spa day! Enjoy the act of washing your face and brushing your teeth more often. Plan a day where you pamper yourself, too.

Don’t think of skipping a day away from your quit smoking training routine. Each morning connect with gratitude and acknowledge that you are not smoking on this day.

Remember life is as precious as we make it. Picture yourself living a live a long and healthy life surrounded by your friends and family. Reflect on those people in your life who are dependent on you, or who think of you as a valuable friend.

By taking better care of yourself and stopping to smell the flowers (your sense of smell will improve, too) take time to enjoy the sunshine and even the raining days that nurture the earth.

You can be the person you really want to be, for you and for your loved ones. Take a stand, and get into a training state of mind. The rest will be easy as you succeed at the quitting marathon.

Smoking Bans – Smokers Not Hire Ready

Employers are using smoking vs. non-smoking as one of the criteria to hire employees.

Whether a person smokes or not could be a deciding factor even before you have been E-Verified.

For smokers looking for gainful employment, their addiction makes the possibilities even harder than they may realize.

Fair Debate for Smokers and Non-Smokers

Smokers are willing and able to work in smoke-free environments and can put up with it in order to work.

Once that craving hits though, they will sneak outside on breaks to have a few puffs of nicotine until quitting time. The working smoker’s perception is they have the best of both worlds – a smoke-free environment on the inside of the workplace and a chance to smoke on the outside during working hours.

The non-smokers want to work in smoke-free environments. A smoking policy inside an employees place of employment will provide an environment free of second hand smoke … except:

What if the employee who smokes reeks of cigarettes

What if the second hand smoke finds its way through open windows, doors, and hallways from around the building.

What if smokers begin smoking in bathrooms, or stairwells?

Then an environment is not truly smoke free and for employees a non smoking is really non-existent.

The Win/Win/Lose

Hospitals and other smoke-free conscious employers are pulling out the stops for justifying their no smoking policies.

With the current healthcare reform policy, employers are justifying the testing of potential employees.  Nicotine tests similar to random drug testing are qualified and being administered.

If non-smokers are hired it is less likely the employee will be hospitalized for ailments related to lung cancer. Insurance cost savings is the rationale for these tests because they can save on costly medical expenses in the future.

Medical costs will be considerably less because symptoms related to asthma, bronchial infections, and allergies will not exist.  Families will be healthier and have less cause to visit the doctor or fill a prescription.  Insurance premiums will not have to cover as many catastrophic illnesses related to smoking and second hand smoke.

If a ban on hiring smokers is embraced by businesses in all 50 states, a long road of tough economic times will be facing those that smoke if they refuse to quit.  Smokers will feel defeated not because they lack the skills to perform their jobs but lack the skills to quit smoking to gain and keep their jobs.  Being a smoker will have a stigma that has obvious and detrimental consequences.

Quit While You Can

These bans are the sign of the times and smokers need to prepare to move with them.  If you are currently unemployed, be aware that your smoking addiction is a possible criterion as to whether you land the next job.

Still working and smoking? Higher insurance rates especially for smokers and other unnecessary risk takers are certain to be the norm. Cessation Programs may have some provisions that give you a timeline to quit before your insurance rates and premiums are dramatically increased.

An important part of your life may be your career.  Do not let smoking be the thing that ends it.

References:

  1. WHO POLICY ON NON-RECRUITMENT OF SMOKERS OR OTHER TOBACCO USERS
  2. Smokers Not Hired

Herbal Stop Smoking Aid – Using Homeopathic Medicines to Quit Smoking

We all know the dangers of smoking, even the dangers associated with second smoke are well documented.

With this alarming information constantly etched into the mind why then, do smokers continue to smoke?

And even more important, is there a safe, sure fire way for them to quit?

Coming into recent attention are the use of homeopathic medicines (herbs) to ease the difficult withdrawal symptoms that keep many smokers from trying to stop and drives many smokers who are attempting quitting back to smoking.

Click to check out > Smoke Deter Natural Stop Smoking Aid

In the Face of Withdrawal Symptoms Many Smokers Pick Up Again

The withdrawal symptoms associated with ending this powerful addiction are headache, nausea, nervousness and irritability, food cravings, cough, shortness of breath, aches and pains, cold sweats, and more.

No wonder the smoker is reluctant to try to stop. But the trade off for not quitting is a continued spiral of adverse health effects that are far worse than the temporary and uncomfortable symptoms of withdrawal.

Discovering the Theory of Homeopathic Medicine

For years homeopathic doctors have used certain herbs to treat these uncomfortable symptoms separately with success.

Derived from the Greek words “homoios” meaning similar and “pathos” meaning disease or suffering, homeopathic medicine employs the use of plants, minerals, and animals to illicit the same symptoms the ‘sick’ person is experiencing.

Although this may sound strange it is logical and has been proven over centuries to work.

The body’s symptoms caused from the sudden change are the body trying to restore itself to homeostasis or balance. Therefore, encouraging and even evoking those symptoms enables the body to find that balance and heal.

Common Homeopathic Medicines and Nicotine Withdrawal Symptoms

Some of the common homeopathic medicines used to treat the symptoms associated with withdrawal from nicotine addiction are:

  • Black Spruce
  • Monkshood
  • Oates
  • Poison Nut

These traditional homeopathic medicines treat not only the physical symptoms of cough, shortness of breath, and food cravings but also the emotional and mental symptoms of withdrawal like nervousness and irritability too.

Smoke Deter Homeopathic Quit Smoking ProductThe benefit of using a natural, homeopathic aid to ease withdrawal symptoms instead of common over the counter and prescription aides is that the OTC treatments continue to supply the body with dangerous, addictive nicotine. The homeopathic medicines allow the smoker to successfully work through the period of withdrawal until they have ceased without the continued assault of toxic elements.

It is important to understand that if you choose the patch, gum, or other nicotine products you’re only extending the withdrawal period from nicotine.

Homeopathic medicines let you face the withdrawal symptoms head on and win!

Smoke Deter Battles Withdrawal Symptoms with Homeopathic Medicines

There is a liquid spray, “Smoke Deter” that utilizes the homeopathic medicines mentioned earlier in one product to ease the withdrawal symptoms associated with quitting smoking and enable the smoker to quit for good.

This product comes in a spray that is used in the mouth that delivers the all natural medicines quickly and safely by sublingual application.

The medicines are absorbed by the blood vessels under the tongue and quickly delivered to the body to stop the symptoms.

Smoke Deter uses Monkshood, Oat, Ignatia Amara, and Poison Nut to aid with the mental and emotional withdrawal symptoms like stress, nervousness, mental hysteria, and the physical symptoms induced by stress.

It also contains Black Spruce, Monkshood, Arsenicum Iodatum, Lung (Pulmo-porcine,) Plantago Major, Quibracho, Stricta Pulomaria (Lung Wort), and Tabacum to treat the physical symptoms like shortness of breath, nausea, cravings, aches and pains, headaches, cough and cold like symptoms, and lung and bronchial inflammation.

Smoke Deter has been proven to work by its many users whose testimonials give credence to this all natural products ability to help the smoker battling to quit to win the battle over withdrawal symptoms and finally become a non-smoker.

You can easily learn more about this unique product which is getting excellent reviews.

Click to check out > Smoke Deter Natural Stop Smoking Aid

Smoke Deter Works

For those of you who have used this program, please share your comments on how the Smoke Deter Homeopathic Stop Smoking Aid helped you.

Herbal Stop Smoking Aid that Helps with Nicotine Withdrawl and Cravings

One of the challenges when quitting smoking is getting through the few days of nicotine withdrawal symptoms.

Luckily the symptoms of withdrawal do not last as long as the psychological habits that some people develop over the years.

One stop smoking product that might help when either type of craving is NicoDrops©™.

As a natural smoking cessation aid it will also help smokers curb the need to smoke when smoking is not an option.

Herbal stop smoking products are gaining in popularity because they are a natural way to control the habit with no attached side effects. People are weary of many of the quit smoking medication side effects for fear of adding even more toxins to the body, or enduring other health related problems.

Reduce the Desire to Smoke

pic-nicodrops-herbalWhen the nicotine craving or desire to smoke kicks in just pop a NicoDrops herbal lozenge into your mouth and you can actually sense the need to smoke dissipate.

Holistic approaches for stopping a cigarette habit can be very effective for most smokers.

The all natural dietary substances and organic herbal ingredients in this product are well researched by experienced herbalists and experts in the field of nicotine addiction.

Each lozenge meets the USDA organic certification and this product was also clinically tested at Brown University Medical School.

NicoDrops Review

Recently we had a comment submitted to CiggyFree.com seeking support for stopping smoking. NicoDrops had contacted us about their product so we asked them to forward a sample to our site’s viewer with the hopes we could help her and also obtain an honest review. After a few weeks time here is what we learned:

“NicoDrops work great at calming my nerves. Every smoker knows when a craving hits you start feeling very anxiety ridden and your will power either breaks or succeeds. I like NicoDrops because they are all organic and yet they even taste good. The most important part is that they actually work!

I am taking them every time I get a craving. I notice that they not only calm me down, they also put me in a better mood. Before I quit smoking I was dreading going through the roller coaster of emotions that ensue the first couple of weeks. I think that NicoDrops are even helping me sleep better at night. This is a big plus and I know this may probably sound weird, but I have lost a little bit of weight as well.

I think this might be because I’m keeping my mouth occupied instead of over eating. This is a great product and I would recommend NicoDrops to anyone who wants to quit smoking and needs some help.” — Nichole Alexander

The first week you pop a lozenge in your mouth every two hours. The second week every three and the third week every four hours. By the fourth week you only take when a craving hits or if you are in the company of smokers and need a little support.

Controlling your smoking is way less expensive than your habit, so don’t let the small temporary cost keep you from trying this proven herbal smoking remedy.

Herbal Smoking Remedy Ingredients

Three of the main ingredients in NicoDrops are organic herbal plant extracts:

  1. Ginseng Root – Dopamine is what makes people feel good after smoking and is part of what leads to the tobacco addiction process. Studies have shown that Ginseng may prevent the nicotine-induced release of the neurotransmitter dopamine.
  2. Valerian – This herb is a natural relaxant and can help with insomnia and other symptoms of withdrawl that effect sleeping habits.
  3. St. John’s Wort – This herb is also known to treat depression symptoms, and may also help reduce smoking urges. There are some cautions on using this herb if you are pregnant or nursing.

Another very important to mention, NicoDrops contains absolutely no nicotine. So many quit cigarette products on the market do. With the help and commitment of companies with stop smoking aids like this maybe we will eventually have an anti-tobacco world where we can all breath air free of tobacco’s contaminants.

If you would like to learn more, visit > NicoDrops.com

Parental Warning: Second-Hand Smoke May Trigger Nicotine Dependence in Kids

New study from Canadian researchers published in Addictive Behaviors

Parents who smoke cigarettes around their kids in cars and homes beware – second-hand smoke may trigger symptoms of nicotine dependence in children.

The findings are published in the September edition of the journal Addictive Behaviors in a joint study from nine Canadian institutions.

“Increased exposure to second-hand smoke, both in cars and homes, was associated with an increased likelihood of children reporting nicotine dependence symptoms, even though these children had never smoked,” says Dr. Jennifer O’Loughlin, senior author of the study, a professor at the Université de Montréal’s Department of Social and Preventive Medicine and a researcher at the Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal.

“These findings support the need for public health interventions that promote non-smoking in the presence of children, and uphold policies to restrict smoking in vehicles when children are present,” adds Dr. O’Loughlin, who collaborated with researchers from the Université de Sherbrooke, the Université de Moncton, the University of British Columbia, McGill University, Concordia University and the Institut national de santé publique du Québec.

Study participants were recruited from 29 Quebec schools as part of AdoQuest, a cohort investigation that measures tobacco use and other health-compromising behaviours. Some 1,800 children aged 10 to 12 years old, from all socioeconomic levels, were asked to complete questionnaires on their health and behaviours. Researchers also asked questions about symptoms of nicotine dependence and exposure to second-hand smoke.

Second Hand Smoke and Children“According to conventional understanding, a person who does not smoke cannot experience nicotine dependence,” says Mathieu Bélanger, the study’s lead author and the new research director of the Centre de Formation Médicale du Nouveau-Brunswick of the Université de Moncton and Université de Sherbrooke. “Our study found that 5 percent of children who had never smoked a cigarette, but who were exposed to secondhand smoke in cars or their homes, reported symptoms of nicotine dependence.”

Dr. O’Loughlin added that this inter-university investigation builds on previous findings: “Exposure to second-hand smoke among non-smokers may cause symptoms that seem to reflect several nicotine withdrawal symptoms: depressed mood, trouble sleeping, irritability, anxiety, restlessness, trouble concentrating and increased appetite.”

About University of Montreal Study on Second Hand Smoke

Contact: Sylvain-Jacques Desjardins
University of Montreal

About the study:

“Nicotine dependence symptoms among young never smokers exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke,” from Addictive Behaviors, was authored by Mathieu Bélanger (Université de Sherbrooke and Université de Moncton), Jennifer O’Loughlin (Université de Montréal and Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal), Louise Guyon (Institut national de santé publique du Québec), André Gervais (Direction de santé publique de Montréal), Jennifer J. McGrath (Concordia University), Chizimuzo T.C. Okoli (University of British Columbia) and Maninder Setia (McGill University).

On the Web:

FSU Researcher Lands $3.3 Million Grant to Help Smokers to Kick Habit

A new study will focus on connection between smoking and anxiety disorders.

Tallahassee, Florida — A Florida State University professor will share a $3.3 million federal grant with a colleague from the University of Vermont to develop an innovative method that will help smokers with anxiety disorders extinguish the habit.

FSU psychology Professor Brad Schmidt and UVM psychology Professor Michael Zvolensky are recruiting about 600 people — 300 at each campus — to participate in the study over the next five years. Funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the $3.3 million grant is one of the largest the scientific organization has ever awarded for this kind of study, Schmidt said.

Cigarette smoking, the leading cause of preventable death and disability in North America, is particularly common among those with, or at risk for developing, panic disorder, according to Schmidt. About 40 percent of individuals with panic disorder are regular smokers and more than 60 percent have a lifetime history of smoking.

“These rates are higher than in the general population where about 25 percent are smokers. Yet no specialized approach currently exists to help smokers with anxiety problems quit,” Schmidt said.

“The thing that makes this smoking cessation program unique is the focus on reducing anxiety sensitivity, which is a risk factor for developing anxiety problems” he said. Nicotine withdrawal produces all kinds of unpleasant feelings, and if you’re extremely sensitive to these kinds of bodily sensations, it could provoke anxiety and panic responses. People with anxiety sensitivity perceive certain physical responses — such as a pounding heart, sweaty palms or dizziness — as a sign of imminent personal harm, even if the cause is something as mundane as stress, caffeine or nicotine. They not only fear their own reactions, they also fear that other people will detect their anxiety, which then increases their anxiety and puts them at risk for a panic attack.

“Some people with anxiety sensitivity actually begin smoking in a misguided attempt to assuage these feelings, while others develop anxiety sensitivity after they pick up the habit in response to the effects of nicotine on their bodies,” Schmidt said. “Either way, many of these anxiety-sensitive smokers find that withdrawal symptoms cause them to be even more anxious and panicky — thwarting their attempts to quit or triggering a relapse.”

Schmidt and Zvolensky’s cessation plan involves four one-on-one sessions. The program includes education, coping skills and anxiety reduction strategies, along with nicotine replacement therapy, such as the patch.

smoker inhaling“We have two inter-related goals, Schmidt said. “The first is to see whether combining some of what we know from our anxiety treatments with the state-of-the-art smoking cessation treatments will enhance our ability to help people quit smoking, and the longer term goal is to determine if these treatments will prevent the development of anxiety problems like panic attacks.”

“If the program is successful, it would reduce the public health burden of both anxiety and smoking-related problems,” Schmidt said. “In addition, the results of the study are expected to increase knowledge about the role of smoking in the development and maintenance of anxiety symptoms, panic attacks and panic disorder and the role that vulnerability to panic attacks plays in smoking relapses.”

For more information, call (850) 645-1766 or visit www.anxietyclinic.fsu.edu/research.htm.

Brad Schmidt
schmidt@psy.fsu.edu
850-644-1707
Florida State University

Withdrawal Symptoms, What’s That?

Withdrawal Symptoms, What’s That?

Withdrawal symptoms are something you may experience as you remove the addictive substance from smoking cigarettes from your body.

This is the stumbling block over which many a would-be quitter trips.

The – problem with many smokers is that they fail to recognize these symptoms – as symptoms.

A withdrawal symptom is something that a person experiences once he or she stops using a substance that gives them a kick.

Oops, is that too hard to digest? Well, let’s try to make it simpler.

There are many things that are identified with substance abuse. Alcohol is one of them, narcotic drugs are another and tobacco is in no way to be left behind. The problem, or let us say that the similarity among all these substances, is that once one gets used to them, breaking away is not easy.

Common Withdrawal Symptoms From Stopping Smoking

  1. Anxiety
  2. Chest tightness
  3. Constipation, gas, stomach pain
  4. Dry mouth
  5. Cough
  6. Cravings to smoke
  7. Depression
  8. Fatigue
  9. Headaches
  10. Increased appetite
  11. Insomnia/hypersomnia
  12. Irritability, crankiness
  13. Mood swings
  14. Postnasal drip
  15. Shifting energy levels
  16. Sore throat, tongue and/or gums
  17. Trouble concentrating (brain fog)

Contrary to popular belief, it is not the fear of deprivation of the pleasantly high feeling that drives the person to use the substance again and again so that it is used, misused and eventually abused.

The person returns for his or her daily shot because of certain altered conditions in the body. These substances are indeed very potent and they affect certain specific spots or centers of the brain.

The brain quickly gets used to these alterations and then before we know it, these centers of the brain cannot do without the daily doze of the substance. The brain did not ask for the substance in the first place but we gave them to it. When we experience that pleasantly high feeling we do not bother about the changes that are taking place within.

It is common knowledge that the entire processes carried about in the brain are maintained by a delicate balance of the various chemical salts there. Once we start using substances like the above mentioned tobacco, narcotics and alcohol, the balance of these chemical salts gets altered.

The body as I mentioned earlier is a self adjusting machine and so this new chemical balance is established and it takes no time for the brain cells to get adjusted to the new balance.

Brain CellsSmoking Dangers to Brain Cells

Then when the brain cells do not get what is required to maintain the new balance (read that as the daily puffs) things go hay wire. The old balance was disturbed and altered and a new balance was set up.

But this new balance is not the real natural thing. It is something that has to be artificially supported and when that daily, or timely dose of nicotine does not get to the brain, the new balance gets upset.

That is when a person gets those peculiar feelings, which can be broadly called the withdrawal symptoms. You know what I am talking about don’t you? Haven’t you felt uneasy and jittery when you were unable to get that puff? It’s a strange kind of feeling isn’t it?

It’s a feeling that can only be soothed when you take that long refreshing pull of highly toxic smoke. Some people break into a sweat, some get the tremors, some feel queasy, some get constipated!

All these are withdrawal symptoms, so unless you prepare yourself to face the pressure of withdrawal, you’re going to face a losing battle.

Psst let’s not leave out an important detail…

The new balance in the brain that was established with the help of the used substance can indeed be broken. I’m not saying that it is easy but once you start conditioning your brain, that it just not going to get what it wants, that is the external substance, the brain will be left with no alternative than to go back and restore the old balance.

Of course the brain is not going to give up without a fight and that is what we are going to experience as the withdrawal symptom. Initially the brain had been doing all too well without the help of any external substance; and then we made the brain become dependent on something.

So when we stop using that something, it is only a matter of time before the brain goes back to its original state of functioning. All we have to do is to muster up the will power to over come the withdrawal symptoms that might set in.

But again I do admit that it is easier said than done. In the end, however, knowing that withdrawals will come (and recognizing them as such), is a vital part of the quitting process.

As the above excerpt states the most important thing that you can do to become successful in a quit; is to recognize that you indeed are addicted and withdrawal symptoms will most likely occur.

Since smoking is addictive both physically and psychologically you need to figure out the underlying reasons why you smoked, and begin the process of changing your behaviors and thought patterns. Start a journal, diary, or a blog.

You generally have approximately 60,000 thoughts per day. The way you think and the thoughts you choose to focus on can be a powerful aid in the process of smoking cessation. If you start believing that you have the power to control addiction then you will choose not to smoke.

Excerpted From: Solve Your Problem eLearning Series

Don’t Wanna “Kick The Bucket” From Smoking

Learn The Harmful Effects

Quit Smoking Now