Tag Archives: nicotine withdrawal symptoms

Training for a Quitter State of Mind

You are here reading this article because quitting cigarette smoking is a goal that you have set to achieve.

Just like a willing person has to train to run a marathon race, you can also train to quit and win the end of cigarettes fight.

Once you have truly made up you mind to quit you will quickly realize losing is not an option.

I Wonder What It Will be Like When…

A Thumbs Up AttitudeIf you are like many smokers who want to quit you have scanned the web for free tips, advice, and articles on ways to stop smoking and now you have a thumbs up attitude and you are ready to engage and receive support to help you quit for good.

This is the training part of the race to quit. During the training embrace a few of the quitting methods simultaneously  to help you find the best method that works for you.

One helpful tip is to close your eyes and slow down your thoughts while connecting to a peaceful place )like you would in a meditation practice) when the urge to light up is strongest. Imagine a future time where you have already quit smoking for good.  Notice how good you feel. Notice the way people support you and acknowledge your success.

The more you imagine the quitting finish line the sooner you will cross it.

Also spend some time thinking of some nice things you can do for yourself with the money you will save. Let this also be part of your meditation process. You can spend time imagining events, places, things, you can enjoy with the savings.

Drink Plenty of Water

Get use to drinking water. Notice when your mouth begins to feel dry and then drink a tall glass of water before you get really thirsty. Water helps to flush the nicotine and carcinogens out of your system quicker than if you drink it during and after you eat.  Soda and sweetened beverages only enhance and add to cigarette cravings.

If you find you worry that you may need something to do with your hands you can keep them busy by journaling what it is like to have a life as a non smoker. You can reflect on the past harm cigarettes did to you as a smoker, and document your healing progress.

Keep a journal handy when you feel the need to light up, and pour out all your feeling and thoughts without censoring them. This is your journal and no one needs to read what you write. You can write about how it feels when smoking urges arise, and how good it feels when your pass on the urge.

You can write about your progress each step of the way. You will often notice your first page or two often shares a few rants, by the third page you will be filled with inspiration as you move beyond your mind to your deeper inner resources. Journaling can help you stay sane, and also provide glimpses and eventually a deep bond with your inner courage and wisdom.

You Are Learning to Take Better Care of Yourself?

You can also find time to pamper yourself a little more.

Give yourself a spa day! Enjoy the act of washing your face and brushing your teeth more often. Plan a day where you pamper yourself, too.

Don’t think of skipping a day away from your quit smoking training routine. Each morning connect with gratitude and acknowledge that you are not smoking on this day.

Remember life is as precious as we make it. Picture yourself living a live a long and healthy life surrounded by your friends and family. Reflect on those people in your life who are dependent on you, or who think of you as a valuable friend.

By taking better care of yourself and stopping to smell the flowers (your sense of smell will improve, too) take time to enjoy the sunshine and even the raining days that nurture the earth.

You can be the person you really want to be, for you and for your loved ones. Take a stand, and get into a training state of mind. The rest will be easy as you succeed at the quitting marathon.

Smoking Bans – Smokers Not Hire Ready

Employers are using smoking vs. non-smoking as one of the criteria to hire employees.

Whether a person smokes or not could be a deciding factor even before you have been E-Verified.

For smokers looking for gainful employment, their addiction makes the possibilities even harder than they may realize.

Fair Debate for Smokers and Non-Smokers

Smokers are willing and able to work in smoke-free environments and can put up with it in order to work.

Once that craving hits though, they will sneak outside on breaks to have a few puffs of nicotine until quitting time. The working smoker’s perception is they have the best of both worlds – a smoke-free environment on the inside of the workplace and a chance to smoke on the outside during working hours.

The non-smokers want to work in smoke-free environments. A smoking policy inside an employees place of employment will provide an environment free of second hand smoke … except:

What if the employee who smokes reeks of cigarettes

What if the second hand smoke finds its way through open windows, doors, and hallways from around the building.

What if smokers begin smoking in bathrooms, or stairwells?

Then an environment is not truly smoke free and for employees a non smoking is really non-existent.

The Win/Win/Lose

Hospitals and other smoke-free conscious employers are pulling out the stops for justifying their no smoking policies.

With the current healthcare reform policy, employers are justifying the testing of potential employees.  Nicotine tests similar to random drug testing are qualified and being administered.

If non-smokers are hired it is less likely the employee will be hospitalized for ailments related to lung cancer. Insurance cost savings is the rationale for these tests because they can save on costly medical expenses in the future.

Medical costs will be considerably less because symptoms related to asthma, bronchial infections, and allergies will not exist.  Families will be healthier and have less cause to visit the doctor or fill a prescription.  Insurance premiums will not have to cover as many catastrophic illnesses related to smoking and second hand smoke.

If a ban on hiring smokers is embraced by businesses in all 50 states, a long road of tough economic times will be facing those that smoke if they refuse to quit.  Smokers will feel defeated not because they lack the skills to perform their jobs but lack the skills to quit smoking to gain and keep their jobs.  Being a smoker will have a stigma that has obvious and detrimental consequences.

Quit While You Can

These bans are the sign of the times and smokers need to prepare to move with them.  If you are currently unemployed, be aware that your smoking addiction is a possible criterion as to whether you land the next job.

Still working and smoking? Higher insurance rates especially for smokers and other unnecessary risk takers are certain to be the norm. Cessation Programs may have some provisions that give you a timeline to quit before your insurance rates and premiums are dramatically increased.

An important part of your life may be your career.  Do not let smoking be the thing that ends it.

References:

  1. WHO POLICY ON NON-RECRUITMENT OF SMOKERS OR OTHER TOBACCO USERS
  2. Smokers Not Hired

Herbal Stop Smoking Aid – The Science Behind Essential Breathing Pipes

One of our website visitors recently alerted us to a fascinating way to help smokers quit.

For a moment, imagine using the same delivery device used for centuries that imposed the negative effects of nicotine dependency being transformed into an herbal healing tool.

This is the story of how the president of Femlogic, Inc., Tanya Moreau-Smith, discovered and created a safe and effective way to help people through the use of Essential Breathing Pipes.

Learn how Tanya’s discoveries progressed to the adaptation of smoking pipes into breathing pipes, and how they are now changing lives for the better.

It Started with an Interest in Alternative Healing

Essential OilsI’ve been interested in alternative healthy healing to assist people and pets in getting and staying well for a long time.

This interest began with internal preparations for everything from stomach issues to immune boosting, kidney and liver detoxifying, and so forth.

A few years ago, I added a collection of my own skin care formulations to my internal herbal preparations, and went on to create the company Femlogic, Inc.

Now, we are adding another line of products that we are very excited about.

From Smoking Pipes to Breathing Pipes

Essential Potions is the name of our line of skin care products that we have been sharing for a while now, and Essential Breathing Pipes are our new product line that we’re currently in the process of patenting.

These are pipes made specifically for the portable aromatherapy dispersion of essential oils or liquids through aspiration. We call them breathing pipes because they’re most certainly not smoking pipes although they look nearly the same.

The pipe itself has never been the guilty party, only the tobacco and toxins delivered through it when burned.

So why not make the pipe a tool to aid in breathing!  Keep the soothing benefits – the repetitive oral and tactile gratification,  but loose the negative substances and the affects from the toxic elements.

NASA Study on the Benefits of Peppermint Oil

While researching new findings – herbs, rainforest elements, essential oils and the like for my skin care line, I came upon a NASA funded study about Peppermint oil.

I was amazed at the list of benefits of breathing peppermint oil vapor could bring to people.

Some proven benefits included:

  • Eating 3000 fewer calories in fat and sugar a week
  • Aiding people in quitting the smoking habit.
  • Amazing results with alleviating stress and calming anxiety
  • Relief from stomach upset
  • Headache Relief
  • Keep drivers alert when behind the wheel
  • Increasing brain function by up to 28 percent
  • Increased physical abilities by up to 14 percent

This list actually kept going on and on!

With a lab full of essential oils, herbs and the like, finding a new way to utilize peppermint oil in a compact and portable, safe, mess and pain free way was right up my alley.

Incense and Peppermints

Flowering Peppermint PlantThe Nasa study lead me to contemplate who in today’s hectic manic world wouldn’t find comfort and aid from using this remarkable oil.  The problem I saw was that you either had to heat the essential oil of peppermint in a traditional aromatherapy burner to benefit or use a nasal inhaler like the athletes have done to increase their performance – never one of my favorite delivery systems.

First I began experimenting by reworking cigarette and cigar holders until I adapted them thus creating my new peppermint oil dispersion system.

I tried them first by breathing on my pipes throughout the day, day in and day out, the majority of my day I found I was using a pipe.

Peppermint Euphoria

The first I felt was a joyful almost euphoric sensation, a sense of peace with that first big deep breath and exhale.  I found this so fascinating and my thought processes became more creative. It felt like I could think outside the box.

Then I noticed my energy level became extremely high.  I found I can curb my appetite and with 5 minutes of pipe breathing before a meal I would eat less. It also helped when I felt the need to normally have a snack.

I was excited to be on the receiving end of the peppermint oil benefits and with this firsthand experience I knew I was on to something big that could help a lot of people.

Giving the Pipe a Smoker’s Test

Essential Breathing PipesI began making various pipes for friends and family and started receiving great feedback.  I gave them to smokers and non smokers alike.

I experimented with version after version working to make a completely heat free portable aromatherapy device. Then came the thought – simple, think simple.  So, I began working backwards and came to the place we’re at now.

The smokers I gave one of my new portable devices to actually stopped smoking using just the pipe! It was as if they turned their addiction from the cigarette onto the pipe, sucking on them for all they were worth at times.

I felt that was just fine! A great exchange and they could use the pipe all day long if need be – at their desk, driving, whenever they would have grabbed a smoke.

No nicotine, no toxins, just organic peppermint vapor, pure and simple.

Amazingly, we discovered with use they were hardly taking in any oil, it was all vapor!

Maybe two-three drops of oil  a week was added to their pipes at most, the majority of people we found use more like a drop or two every three to four weeks.

Smoker’s Transition to Stop Smoking

We found that after a few weeks of the transference from smoking cigarettes to sucking on their Essential pipe the smokers began using it a little less and less.  They went from manic use to whenever they were stressing at work, in traffic and furious behind the wheel, experiencing headaches, or stomach upset, or feeling hungry between meals.

Now we find,  two to three months after the beginning of the quitting process, the now non smokers are using their pipes  strictly for pleasure – just like the non smokers that have found the comfort in the repetitive hand to mouth movement.

The smokers didn’t transfer their addiction to candy, cookies, junk food, coffee, cokes and other addictive substances.  They didn’t even gain weight.  What they used to for transfering their addition was just a stage and it was a  healthy one which was helpful for cleaning and improving lung function on top of all the other benefits found in the studies.

The Latest Essential Oil Breathing Pipes

Essential Breathing PipesOur most recent development is launching our hand carved hard wood pipes which are made in the USA. And we are collecting additional wood crafters who are excited about the benefits of the pipes and are interested in making them.

Our new Lucite pipes are made in Italy.  We are also working on new designs such as retrofitting bowl style pipes with our dispersion elements.

Oh, and the pipes come in a range of prices from very affordable to more expensive, and even those perfect for pipe collectors.

You can learn more about Femlogic’s Essential Breathing Pipes by visiting their website. You will be received with enthusiasm and find a really nice assortment of pipes to choose from.

Learn about > The Science Behind Essential Breathing Pipes

Story and Credit: Tanya Moreau-Smith, FemlogicInc.com.

Herbal Stop Smoking Aid – Using Homeopathic Medicines to Quit Smoking

We all know the dangers of smoking, even the dangers associated with second smoke are well documented.

With this alarming information constantly etched into the mind why then, do smokers continue to smoke?

And even more important, is there a safe, sure fire way for them to quit?

Coming into recent attention are the use of homeopathic medicines (herbs) to ease the difficult withdrawal symptoms that keep many smokers from trying to stop and drives many smokers who are attempting quitting back to smoking.

Click to check out > Smoke Deter Natural Stop Smoking Aid

In the Face of Withdrawal Symptoms Many Smokers Pick Up Again

The withdrawal symptoms associated with ending this powerful addiction are headache, nausea, nervousness and irritability, food cravings, cough, shortness of breath, aches and pains, cold sweats, and more.

No wonder the smoker is reluctant to try to stop. But the trade off for not quitting is a continued spiral of adverse health effects that are far worse than the temporary and uncomfortable symptoms of withdrawal.

Discovering the Theory of Homeopathic Medicine

For years homeopathic doctors have used certain herbs to treat these uncomfortable symptoms separately with success.

Derived from the Greek words “homoios” meaning similar and “pathos” meaning disease or suffering, homeopathic medicine employs the use of plants, minerals, and animals to illicit the same symptoms the ‘sick’ person is experiencing.

Although this may sound strange it is logical and has been proven over centuries to work.

The body’s symptoms caused from the sudden change are the body trying to restore itself to homeostasis or balance. Therefore, encouraging and even evoking those symptoms enables the body to find that balance and heal.

Common Homeopathic Medicines and Nicotine Withdrawal Symptoms

Some of the common homeopathic medicines used to treat the symptoms associated with withdrawal from nicotine addiction are:

  • Black Spruce
  • Monkshood
  • Oates
  • Poison Nut

These traditional homeopathic medicines treat not only the physical symptoms of cough, shortness of breath, and food cravings but also the emotional and mental symptoms of withdrawal like nervousness and irritability too.

Smoke Deter Homeopathic Quit Smoking ProductThe benefit of using a natural, homeopathic aid to ease withdrawal symptoms instead of common over the counter and prescription aides is that the OTC treatments continue to supply the body with dangerous, addictive nicotine. The homeopathic medicines allow the smoker to successfully work through the period of withdrawal until they have ceased without the continued assault of toxic elements.

It is important to understand that if you choose the patch, gum, or other nicotine products you’re only extending the withdrawal period from nicotine.

Homeopathic medicines let you face the withdrawal symptoms head on and win!

Smoke Deter Battles Withdrawal Symptoms with Homeopathic Medicines

There is a liquid spray, “Smoke Deter” that utilizes the homeopathic medicines mentioned earlier in one product to ease the withdrawal symptoms associated with quitting smoking and enable the smoker to quit for good.

This product comes in a spray that is used in the mouth that delivers the all natural medicines quickly and safely by sublingual application.

The medicines are absorbed by the blood vessels under the tongue and quickly delivered to the body to stop the symptoms.

Smoke Deter uses Monkshood, Oat, Ignatia Amara, and Poison Nut to aid with the mental and emotional withdrawal symptoms like stress, nervousness, mental hysteria, and the physical symptoms induced by stress.

It also contains Black Spruce, Monkshood, Arsenicum Iodatum, Lung (Pulmo-porcine,) Plantago Major, Quibracho, Stricta Pulomaria (Lung Wort), and Tabacum to treat the physical symptoms like shortness of breath, nausea, cravings, aches and pains, headaches, cough and cold like symptoms, and lung and bronchial inflammation.

Smoke Deter has been proven to work by its many users whose testimonials give credence to this all natural products ability to help the smoker battling to quit to win the battle over withdrawal symptoms and finally become a non-smoker.

You can easily learn more about this unique product which is getting excellent reviews.

Click to check out > Smoke Deter Natural Stop Smoking Aid

Smoke Deter Works

For those of you who have used this program, please share your comments on how the Smoke Deter Homeopathic Stop Smoking Aid helped you.

Is Fear of Gaining Weight Keeping Many Women from Trying to Quit Smoking?

[UMHS-Press Release]

Women and Smoking

Smokers are more likely to have unrealistic body image & eating problems, and women who had weight problems as girls are more likely to start smoking early.

Is a fear of getting fatter partly to blame for the fact that nearly one in five American women still smokes, and many don’t try to quit?

Although there are many possible reasons for the stubborn persistence of smoking, fear of weight gain is high on the list for many women, says a University of Michigan Health System researcher who has devoted much of her career to studying this issue.

Although there are many possible reasons for the stubborn persistence of smoking, fear of weight gain is high on the list for many women, says a University of Michigan Health System researcher who has devoted much of her career to studying this issue.

weight.jpgSeveral years ago, she and her team reported that 75 percent of all women smokers say they would be unwilling to gain more than five pounds if they were to quit smoking, and nearly half said they would not tolerate any weight gain. In fact, many women started smoking in the first place because they thought it might help them stay slim.

Now, new U-M research findings published in the October issue of Addictive Behaviors show that women who smoke tend to be further from their ideal body image, and more prone to dieting and binging, than those who don’t smoke.

Cigarettes are well known to suppress appetite and weight, says Cindy Pomerleau, Ph.D., director of the U-M Nicotine Research Laboratory. “So it’s hardly surprising that women who have trouble managing their weight or are dissatisfied with their bodies are drawn to smoking,” she says.

In another recent study, published in August, the U-M team found that overweight women smokers who were overweight as children were far more likely to have started smoking in their early teens than women whose weight problems started later in life. They also had worse withdrawal symptoms when they tried to quit.

Once they make a serious attempt to quit, evidence suggests that most weight-concerned smokers can be just as successful in kicking the habit as others.

“The problem here is getting women who are concerned about their weight to be willing to try to make a quit attempt,” says Pomerleau, “and then helping them gain a sense of control over their weight.”

Women who are highly concerned about weight tend to be concerned about other aspects of their appearance as well, she notes. What they need to understand, she says, is that smoking has an impact on many aspects of appearance and attractiveness. Among other things, it causes wrinkled skin, thinning hair, cracked fingernails, yellowed teeth and terrible breath.

Pomerleau, a research professor of psychiatry, is working on a book about women, smoking and weight loss that will draw together research findings, helpful tips and real-life examples of women who quit tobacco while also containing their weight.

Some beliefs about smoking and weight are true, she says. For instance, nicotine suppresses the appetite and increases resting metabolic rate. Smokers on average weigh less than people who have never smoked, and that smokers who quit tend to gain weight. Adding to these perceptions are tobacco advertisements that portray female smokers as slim and successful.

Even so, the effect of quitting on weight is often less dramatic than many women fear, Pomerleau says. A rough rule of thumb is that one in four women who quit smoking will gain less than five pounds, and another two out of four will gain five to 15 pounds. Only one in four women who quit will gain 15 pounds or more.

But Pomerleau’s own research suggests that many women smokers start out with an unrealistic image of how they would like their bodies to look. This may make their dread of gaining weight even worse.

In her paper in Addictive Behaviors, she reports the results of a study of 587 women between the ages of 18 and 55, including 420 smokers and 167 women who had never smoked. An equal proportion of both groups was overweight or obese, with a body mass index of 25 or more.

In the study, the smokers and non-smokers were asked to look at silhouette pictures of 10 different body types, ranging from thinnest to fattest, and to choose which one their current body type was closest to, and which one they wanted to look most like. They were also asked questions about their self-image and their eating habits, about how concerned they were about gaining weight if they quit smoking, and about how sure they were that they could stay off cigarettes even if they gained weight.

The smokers chose an ideal body shape that was slimmer than the non-smokers chose, and further from how they perceived themselves as looking. They also had more problems with limiting their eating. Smokers who were overweight were especially doubtful about their ability to stay off tobacco if they started to gain weight.

This study, Pomerleau says, suggests that if women smokers are to succeed in quitting, they may need extra help in achieving a more realistic body image and paying attention to unhealthful eating patterns, particularly if they are already overweight.

At the same time, Pomerleau and her team have found that the earlier in life a weight problem starts, the more likely a woman is to start smoking.

In a study of 89 overweight women smokers, those who remembered being overweight before they reached junior high school reported that they had started experimenting with smoking at around age 13 – compared with women whose weight problems didn’t start until junior high or after, who hadn’t tried smoking till they reached age 15.

The women who were overweight as children also reported more nicotine-withdrawal symptoms when they tried to quit smoking, especially symptoms like anger, irritability and trouble concentrating. The study was published in the August issue of Eating Behaviors.

These studies, and others that the U-M team have done, all point to the importance of finding new strategies to help women quit smoking without losing control of their weight. Although severe dieting during a smoking cessation attempt has not been shown to be helpful in either quitting smoking or controlling weight, it may be unrealistic to expect women with strong weight concerns to put these concerns on hold for several weeks or months while they try to quit tobacco.

“What we would like to work for is a kind of compromise strategy, where the focus is on the smoking cessation, but women can also take some passive and active measures to control their weight,” Pomerleau says.

Passive measures include things like nicotine patches and gum, and medicines like bupropion, which can help in controlling weight gain while keeping nicotine withdrawal symptoms at bay.

Another option for women is to launch their stop-smoking effort early in their menstrual cycle, so that the bloating that can happen soon after they snuff out their last cigarette won’t be compounded by the bloating that comes along right before their period begins.

Finally, although strenuous dieting is not recommended, Pomerleau says, women can start immediately to rebalance the energy-in/energy-out equation by not substituting eating for smoking, and by increasing their physical activity. Even brief bouts of exercise, such as stretching or walking, can be effective in distracting a woman when the urge to smoke strikes, she says, and they burn a few calories too.

Facts About Smoking and Health

  • Smoking damages a woman’s hair, skin, nails, teeth, voice and more.
  • Smoking causes lung problems, including lung cancer, which kills far more women than any other form of cancer including breast cancer.
  • Smoking increases the chance of heart disease and stroke, the number one and number three killers of women.
  • Smoking can reduce a woman’s fertility, making it harder to get pregnant.
  • Smoking can cause abnormal growth of cells in the cervix, a condition known as cervical dysplasia that can lead to cervical cancer.
  • Smoking during pregnancy increases the chance that a woman will miscarry or experience pregnancy problems, and increases the chance that her baby will suffer problems.
  • Quitting smoking often leads to weight gain, but three-quarters of women who quit will gain 15 pounds or less.
  • Quitting smoking is one of the most important things a person can do to improve their health now and in the future. Once a smoker has quit, the harm that smoking has done to their body will stop and even start to reverse. In fact, within 15 years of quitting smoking, death rates for ex-smokers are the same as for people of the same age who have never smoked.

U-M Health Minute: Today’s top health issues and medical research
Written by Kara Gavin

Learn more on the web or by phone at:
The American Lung Association: Freedom from SmokingAmerican Cancer Society Stop-smoking help, and information on the Nov. 15 Great American Smokeout, or call 1-800-ACS-2345

Smokefree.gov:
A web site for Americans who want to quit smoking, from the National Cancer Institute or call 800-QUITNOW   Hearing impaired: TTY 1-800-332-8615

U-M Nicotine Research Laboratory

Study references:
Addictive Behaviors, Volume 32, Issue 10, October 2007, pp. 2329-2334
Eating Behaviors, Volume 8, Issue 3, August 2007, pp. 418-422

Dealing With Nicotine Withdrawl

Everybody knows that nicotine withdrawal comes with the territory of quitting smoking but that doesn’t make it any easier.

It can be hard and even frustrating for the person quitting to deal with withdrawal and for those around the person.

But understanding what’s going on, physically and psychologically, can help and can assist you in helping a friend quit.

When smokers quit, they begin to go through some changes, some physical, some emotional. The physical symptoms, while annoying and difficult, are not life threatening.

Nicotine replacement products such as the patch or gum can help reduce many of these physical symptoms. For most smokers, the bigger challenge is the psychological part of quitting.

This psychological part of smoking is really hard to beat because smoking becomes linked to so many things – things like waking up in the morning, eating, reading, watching TV, drinking coffee, etc. It’s like a ritual.

Your body becomes used to having a cigarette with certain activities and will miss this link when you first become smoke-free.
Woman Yanking HairIt will take time to “un-link” smoking from these activities.

Unfortunately, the patch or gum can’t relieve the psychological need to smoke. That’s why it’s so important for the smoker to create a plan to deal with situations that trigger their urge to smoke. Smokers can also ask friends and family for support with simple things like walking around the building before class instead of having a cigarette.

Stop Smoking Withdrawal Symptoms

If and when a smoker goes through withdrawal, they need to keep this in mind. Even though they may not act like themselves, and they may feel rotten, these feelings will pass. After 30 days or so, and after they’ve quit smoking, all this will be behind them. In the meantime, here are some of the withdrawal symptoms smokers may experience and what they can do about them.

Craving – This is the body’s physical addiction saying, “I need nicotine now!” Each craving will last for only a couple of minutes and will eventually stop happening altogether in about seven days. Smokers should use nicotine replacement products to help reduce cravings.If the smoker still feels the urge, they can admit out loud to themselves or someone else that they are having a craving. Then they should count to one hundred and let the feeling pass – and it will, usually within a couple minutes.

Difficulty Concentrating –  “Help, I quit smoking and I can’t concentrate!” Some people say nicotine helps focus their attention. When they quit smoking, the increased blood flow and oxygen can lead to a feeling of mental fogginess.If this happens, they should try making lists and daily schedules to keep organized, then set aside some total relaxation time when they don’t have to concentrate on anything!

Fatigue/Sleeping Problems –  Trouble sleeping and fatigue are common symptoms of withdrawal. Because nicotine increases one’s metabolism to an abnormally high rate, when people stop smoking their metabolism drops back to normal, making them feel like their energy level has dropped.So what can they do? They need to get their body used to the new metabolic rate by getting plenty of sleep, whenever possible. Although sleep patterns may be interrupted at first, this is normal and temporary.

Irritability –  If you have snapped at someone or had a new non-smoker snap at you, you know what we are talking about. Irritability is caused by the body trying to adjust to the sudden disappearance of all those chemicals it’s been used to. The best way to handle this is for smokers to simply be honest with those around them that they are trying to quit and they do not feel like themselves.

Source: American Cancer Society

Withdrawal Symptoms, What’s That?

Withdrawal Symptoms, What’s That?

Withdrawal symptoms are something you may experience as you remove the addictive substance from smoking cigarettes from your body.

This is the stumbling block over which many a would-be quitter trips.

The – problem with many smokers is that they fail to recognize these symptoms – as symptoms.

A withdrawal symptom is something that a person experiences once he or she stops using a substance that gives them a kick.

Oops, is that too hard to digest? Well, let’s try to make it simpler.

There are many things that are identified with substance abuse. Alcohol is one of them, narcotic drugs are another and tobacco is in no way to be left behind. The problem, or let us say that the similarity among all these substances, is that once one gets used to them, breaking away is not easy.

Common Withdrawal Symptoms From Stopping Smoking

  1. Anxiety
  2. Chest tightness
  3. Constipation, gas, stomach pain
  4. Dry mouth
  5. Cough
  6. Cravings to smoke
  7. Depression
  8. Fatigue
  9. Headaches
  10. Increased appetite
  11. Insomnia/hypersomnia
  12. Irritability, crankiness
  13. Mood swings
  14. Postnasal drip
  15. Shifting energy levels
  16. Sore throat, tongue and/or gums
  17. Trouble concentrating (brain fog)

Contrary to popular belief, it is not the fear of deprivation of the pleasantly high feeling that drives the person to use the substance again and again so that it is used, misused and eventually abused.

The person returns for his or her daily shot because of certain altered conditions in the body. These substances are indeed very potent and they affect certain specific spots or centers of the brain.

The brain quickly gets used to these alterations and then before we know it, these centers of the brain cannot do without the daily doze of the substance. The brain did not ask for the substance in the first place but we gave them to it. When we experience that pleasantly high feeling we do not bother about the changes that are taking place within.

It is common knowledge that the entire processes carried about in the brain are maintained by a delicate balance of the various chemical salts there. Once we start using substances like the above mentioned tobacco, narcotics and alcohol, the balance of these chemical salts gets altered.

The body as I mentioned earlier is a self adjusting machine and so this new chemical balance is established and it takes no time for the brain cells to get adjusted to the new balance.

Brain CellsSmoking Dangers to Brain Cells

Then when the brain cells do not get what is required to maintain the new balance (read that as the daily puffs) things go hay wire. The old balance was disturbed and altered and a new balance was set up.

But this new balance is not the real natural thing. It is something that has to be artificially supported and when that daily, or timely dose of nicotine does not get to the brain, the new balance gets upset.

That is when a person gets those peculiar feelings, which can be broadly called the withdrawal symptoms. You know what I am talking about don’t you? Haven’t you felt uneasy and jittery when you were unable to get that puff? It’s a strange kind of feeling isn’t it?

It’s a feeling that can only be soothed when you take that long refreshing pull of highly toxic smoke. Some people break into a sweat, some get the tremors, some feel queasy, some get constipated!

All these are withdrawal symptoms, so unless you prepare yourself to face the pressure of withdrawal, you’re going to face a losing battle.

Psst let’s not leave out an important detail…

The new balance in the brain that was established with the help of the used substance can indeed be broken. I’m not saying that it is easy but once you start conditioning your brain, that it just not going to get what it wants, that is the external substance, the brain will be left with no alternative than to go back and restore the old balance.

Of course the brain is not going to give up without a fight and that is what we are going to experience as the withdrawal symptom. Initially the brain had been doing all too well without the help of any external substance; and then we made the brain become dependent on something.

So when we stop using that something, it is only a matter of time before the brain goes back to its original state of functioning. All we have to do is to muster up the will power to over come the withdrawal symptoms that might set in.

But again I do admit that it is easier said than done. In the end, however, knowing that withdrawals will come (and recognizing them as such), is a vital part of the quitting process.

As the above excerpt states the most important thing that you can do to become successful in a quit; is to recognize that you indeed are addicted and withdrawal symptoms will most likely occur.

Since smoking is addictive both physically and psychologically you need to figure out the underlying reasons why you smoked, and begin the process of changing your behaviors and thought patterns. Start a journal, diary, or a blog.

You generally have approximately 60,000 thoughts per day. The way you think and the thoughts you choose to focus on can be a powerful aid in the process of smoking cessation. If you start believing that you have the power to control addiction then you will choose not to smoke.

Excerpted From: Solve Your Problem eLearning Series

Don’t Wanna “Kick The Bucket” From Smoking

Learn The Harmful Effects

Quit Smoking Now