Tag Archives: emphysema

On Average 10 Year Decrease in Life Expectancy for Smokers

If you are a smoker who just doesn’t want to quit, then you are subjecting yourself to a shorter life span than average.

By continuing to smoke, you have a greater chance of losing 10 years off your life, time that could be spent with your loved ones.

You also subject yourself to a general decline in health during those last years of your life while you are afflicted with one or several health complications as a result from smoking. These are health struggles that you also subject your loved ones to witness. Is it worth it?

What Quitting Smoking Can Do For You

Now that you know that a long-term smoker, on average, has a life expectancy of about 10 years less than a non-smoker, it is time to seek support and help to stop smoking now.

If you have smoked since your teen years or young adulthood, your chances of reversing any damage is significant. By stopping before the age of 35, you greatly improve your risk of any damage compared to people who have never smoked.

If you choose to stop smoking prior to the age of 50, the risk of dying from smoking-related diseases decreases by fifty percent. You can decrease that even further by making better health, nutrition, and diet choices.

Not Quitting Can Kill You

Quitting smoking not only dramatically improves your overall life expectancy, but it can improve your general well-being and overall health. No matter what your age or how long you’ve been smoking, it’s never too late to quit.

If you are hard-headed and need greater evidence on the decrease in life expectancy of smokers, take a look at this very long list of celebrities whose shortened life spans were caused from smoking tobacco.

As you can see, so many talented individuals died much earlier than the average life expectancy. And those who lived until their 80s struggled through many years of health afflictions—such as heart attack, emphysema, lung cancer, and throat cancer—due to their dangerous addiction to smoking.

Celebrity or not, no smoker is immune from smoking-related illnesses or even death.

Click for >  Celebrities Who Died From Smoking Related Illness

Understanding Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Part I

Chronic Pulmonary Disease kills over 100 thousand Americans each year.

This makes COPD the fourth leading cause of death in the United States.

Take a moment and learn about COPD, and how this combination of diseases (chronic bronchitis and emphysema) combine to create COPD, and how to detect it.

click for > Part Two: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Understanding Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Part II

Over twelve million people currently suffer from Chronic Pulmonary Disease in American this year.

COPD is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States.

Take a moment and learn about treatments for COPD, and how the symptoms of this combination of diseases (chronic bronchitis and emphysema) can be controlled.

Bronchodialators are one of the most used treatments and consist of several different types. Learn about several other options to treat this incurable disease.

click for > Part One: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

A Bachelor’s Degree for Quitting Smoking?

For Nora King, a former chain-smoker with a master’s degree, it was neither a harrowing visit to her doctor nor a disturbing news article on the latest findings about the damage of cigarettes that caused her to put down her smokes once and for all.

It was a television commercial she saw a year ago in her New York City apartment that vividly illustrated what goes on inside a smoker’s body that made her decide to try to quit though a new study suggests the academic work she did years ago may have helped, too.

“The commercial showed the white stuff that builds up in smokers’ arteries,” King, 44, said. “It was really graphic and gross, and I would turn my head every time it came on.”

Visual images in stop-smoking ads have been a mainstay of stop smoking campaigns for years, but researchers at the University of Wisconsin recently found they may be more effective helping those with a college degree than those with a high school diploma or only some college.

“Smoking rates have declined steadily since 1966 for college-educated smokers with some college, but they have declined far more slowly for people who have high school, and we wanted to know why that is,” said Dr. Jeff Niederdeppe, a researcher at the University of Wisconsin’s department of population health sciences and an author of the study.

Cigarette smoking has declined among adults in the United States from about 42 percent of the population in 1965 to about 21 percent in 2005 (the latest year for which numbers are available), according to the American Cancer Society. Figures from the society’s Web site show that about 45 million adults currently smoke cigarettes – and 24 percent of men and 18 percent of women are smokers.

For their study, Niederdeppe’s team interviewed a representative sample of smokers: some who had a college degree, some who had some college experience, and some who had a high school diploma.The smokers all saw stop smoking ads, and a year later, the research team then came back and interviewed the same group to see who had tried to quit and who had been able to quit in that period.

“Some type of media messages were less effective for people with lower levels of education,” Nierderdeppe said, “but we weren’t able to say definitively why that is.”

He said that the greatest discrepancy between groups trying to quit occurred based on the type of ad that encouraged the smoker to keep trying to quit, even though it’s hard, and they can call a helpline for support.

“We saw a big difference between education levels for the keep-trying-to-quit ads,” Niederdeppe said.

A reason Americans without a college degree responded less to the stop smoking ads is because education is tied to socioeconomic status and less-educated smokers may have less access to quit resources and may be less likely to be given medications to quit, Niederdeppe said.

The essence of the ads that college-educated smokers responded to, “If you keep trying to quit, you can do it,” may not be true for smokers who are in a lower socioeconomic status, said Niederdeppe.

“This message may not resonate with their experience,” he said. “Higher educated people have much more resources, social resources, and environments that restrict smoking.”

Nancy DiMartino, 61, who has some college but no degree, said commercials haven’t helped her quit.

“There’s an old saying: nothing scares an addict,” she said.

Picture of Graduation CapDiMartino, a former transcribing legal secretary who took several college credits to become certified, said, cigarettes help her deaden her emotions, so she’s out the door to the store to buy cigarettes as soon as she feels a negative emotion coming on.

“Cigarettes numb me out like alcohol does for an alcoholic, or drugs do for a drug addict,” she said.

Although her father died of emphysema, DiMartino said that the powerful chokehold nicotine has on her, physically as well as mentally, has made quitting a seemingly impossible task.

She successfully managed to quit for five years, but it didn’t last. One recent Christmas Eve, after she lost her job with a government agency, she was mugged.

The stress proved to be too much, and DiMartino picked up where she had left off.

Even when one of her grandchildren saw her smoking and began to cry, begging her to stop smoking, she has been unable to leave the habit behind for a second time.

DiMartino knows what kind of danger she is putting herself in by continuing to smoke.

“I have carpal tunnel syndrome and it’s getting worse,” she said. “I know I could wind up on an oxygen tank. But whenever I see those ads, I think that this could never happen to me,” she said.

Source: The Modesto Bee
Original source: Jessica Freiman, Columbia News Service

Quit Smoking is the Way to Good Health

Cigarette smoking kills approximately 300,000 in the United States each year, and most of these people are seniors.

Lung cancer and emphysema are the best-known miserable outcomes.

However, accelerated development of atherosclerosis is the most important problem resulting from smoking.

This results in heart attacks and strokes, heart pains, leg pains, and many other problems. Pipe and cigar smoking do not have the pulmonary consequences that cigarette smoking does, but they do predispose to cancer of the lips, and tongue. Nicotine in any form has the same bad effects on the small blood vessels and thus accelerates development of atherosclerosis.

n.jpgIt is never too late to quit.

Only two years after stopping cigarette smoking, your risk of heart attack returns to average.

It has actually decreased substantially the very next day! After ten years your risk for lung cancer is back to nearly normal.

After only two years there is a decrease in lung cancer risk by perhaps one-third.

The development of emphysema is arrested for many people when they stop smoking, although this condition does not reverse. Seniors often feel that it is too late for changes in lifestyle to have beneficial effects on their health.

Not so. Most seniors have plenty of time to get major health benefits from quitting smoking. Remember that after age 65 men live an average of 15.4 more years and women 19.2 years. Chances of stroke and heart attack begin to go down immediately after you quit. Moreover, you will notice at once that your environment has become more friendly when you are not a smoker. Many of the daily hassles that impair the quality of your life go away when you stop offending others by this habit.

Many health educators are skeptical about cutting down slowly and stress that you need to stop completely. This may not always be true for seniors. For some people, rationing is a good way to get their smoking down to a much lower level, at which point it may be easier to stop entirely.

For example, the simple decision not to smoke in public can both help your health and decrease your daily hassles. To cut down, keep in the cigarette pack only those cigarettes you are going to allow yourself that day. Smoke the cigarettes only halfway down before extinguishing them.

There are many good stop-smoking courses offered through the American Cancer Society, the American Lung Association, and local hospitals. Most people won’t need these, but they can be of help. Try by yourself first. Then, if you still need help, get it.

Nicotine chewing gum or patches can help some people quit, and your doctor can give you a prescription and advice. Don’t plan on this as a long-term solution, since the nicotine in the gum or patch is just as bad for your arteries as the nicotine in cigarettes.

The challenge to stop smoking is an example of your ability to make your own choices if you are trapped by your addictions, even the lesser ones, you can’t make your own choices. Victory over smoking behaviors improves your mental health, in part because this is a difficult victory. It can open the door to success in other areas.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/health-articles/quit-smoking-is-the-way-to-good-health-220346.html

Dying from Emphysema

Tobacco has taken its toll on Haines resident Jim Hamp. His wife and mother both died of tobacco-related cancers, and Hamp is dying from emphysema.

A longtime charter and commercial fisherman, Hamp, 68, now has to wear a nasal cannula (a plastic hose that pumps oxygen from a tank into his nose) and rarely has the energy to visit is boat.

Some days he barely has the energy to reach across the kitchen table. After smoking for 50 years, Hamp said he’d trade all the pleasure he got from cigarettes for one more good day of breathing. Now that he’s dying, Hamp wants to warn young smokers about what awaits them.

“Tobacco is just a matter of time. It doesn’t matter who you are,” Hamp said. “Why tempt how long? You’re playing with your life.”

Even though he sold cigarettes when he was growing up, Hamp said he didn’t start smoking until after he went to college. He said both of his parents smoked and it was the accepted thing to do. When he was in the military, more than 200 of the 244 soldiers in his company smoked. Within a year of starting, Hamp said he was smoking 1 1/2 packs a day.

Hamp managed a marina in Michigan, then moved to Anchorage in 1980 after visiting a friend and settled in Haines in 1983. He said he was extremely active until his early 60s and working a 16-hour day was nothing.

Picture of Old ManBut seven years ago, while pulling a shrimp pot, Hamp said he “folded up.” He said it was like someone “put a plastic bag over his mouth,” he wasn’t in pain but he couldn’t get any air. “It was like I’d been punched in the stomach, that’s one way to describe it,” he said.

Hamp said he was real close to respiratory arrest. When he went to the doctor, the tests found scar tissue from pneumonia and emphysema. He was told if he quit smoking, he might have four or five years left.

After several failed attempts at quitting on his own, Hamp called SEARHC Tobacco Health Educator Jane Weagant. She helped him cut down to a couple of cigarettes a day, but the addiction is too powerful for him to completely give up smoking.

“I know it’s killing me, and it’s shortening what life I have left. But it still is very difficult to quit,” said Hamp, who hopes his story can help someone else quit or decide not to start smoking. “If I had to do it over again I wouldn’t start.”

Related Information:

The SEARHC Tobacco Program can be reached at 1-888-966-8875 (Southeast region) during normal business hours.

The Alaska Tobacco Quit Line number is 1-888-842-QUIT (842-7848) and is available 24 hours a day.

Source: SitNews