Tag Archives: effects of smoking

Nicotine in Cigarettes Contribute to Cluster Headaches and Migraines

Many people are plagued with chronic headaches and migraines and are mystified by what causes them. One probable cause could be second-hand smoke and, if you are a smoker, the act itself.

A visit to WebMD.com Migraines and Headaches health center explains how the nicotine contained in tobacco, when inhaled, will stimulate the blood vessels in the brain, causing them to constrict or narrow.

Smoking a cigarette will also cause the stimulated nerves in the back of the throat to magnify the problem.

Nicotine Hurts Your Head

Studies have also shown that cluster headaches—or headaches that keep returning for a period of time, such as two or three times a day for a week or even months—caused by second-hand smoke exposure were fully relieved once the migraine sufferer was no longer exposed to smoke.

Smokers suffering from cluster headaches have also found their headaches were reduced by 50% when they reduced smoking from a pack a day to half a pack, or by 50%. Doesn’t it make sense that quitting entirely could take care of the problem?

Smoking is a Headache

If you find headaches of any form a problem and all physical factors have been examined and ruled out, then toxicity in your body could be the leading cause.

If you are a cigarette smoker and are brave enough to smoke, then you should be brave enough to see the effects of a cluster headache. The following video will give you another reason to stop smoking now.

reference: http://www.webmd.com/migraines-headaches/guide/triggers-smoking

Will New FDA Regulations Backfire and Lend Big Tobacco a Hand?

Government tobacco regulation has been a topic of discussion for years.

Today, the house approved a bill titled, “Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act” that would allow the FDA the power to regulate the sale of tobacco products and the ingredients they contain.

For instance, tobacco companies would be banned from adding fruity flavors or additives designed to hook young smokers.

Look Dad, I Can Smoke, Too

pic-candy-ciggysDepending on your age, you may remember the candy cigarettes given to kids. I remember eating them and mimicking my parent’s smoking habits. In those days, the dangers of smoking was downplayed and the uphill battle to expose their risks had not yet kicked in.

Recently, R J Reynold’s Camel No 9 marketing tactics were similar. They aimed their campaign at young women smokers with packaging that is dressed up in pretty pink, a light and luscious slogan, and parties offering gifts. If this bill makes it through congress, perhaps the FDA will take steps to curb actions that attempt to entice young smokers to the negative effects of smoking tobacco products.

We wonder how closely the FDA will view all the harmful additives in cigarettes, and how much of a difference it will make in the end. The FDA does not have a strong track record in keeping toxic substances out of food or personal care products. Therefore, how well will they regulate products we inhale or chew?

Another thing to consider are the existing cigarette ingredients. If they are to be “grandfathered in” like the cheap ingredients found in many personal care products, the FDA could end up allowing more toxic substances in consumer items than they already do.

Imagine the FDA regulation of tobacco products backfiring and thus supporting Big Tobacco’s idea to manipulate FDA regulation by advertising that their products as “FDA Approved.”  This would give people the wrong idea: that there is a safe cigarette.

Hopefully, by the time this bill is approved, it will be well thought out. At least the government is attempting to take the lead in addressing the unchecked power over people’s health that Big Tobacco has had for years.

Times are changing, this is a good thing.

How Long After You Quit Smoking Does Healing Begin?

Healing from the effects of smoking is possible, but it does take time.

The following is a guideline to give you an idea how your immune system kicks in to clear the effects of smoking from your system and promote healing.

We know it is wise to give your system additional nutritional support when smoking, but don’t forget that after you quit you want to support your body with nutrition to help support physical healing.

Effects of Quitting Smoking – After Eight Hours

  • Carbon monoxide in your body drops.
  • Oxygen level in your blood increases to normal.

Two days After Quitting Smoking

  • Your sense of smell and taste will improve.
  • You will enjoy the taste of your food more.
  • Your risk of heart attack begins to decrease.

After Three of Four Days

  • Bronchial tubes relax.
  • Your lung capacity will have increased.
  • Breathing becomes easier.

After Two Weeks of Not Smoking

  • Blood flow improves; nicotine has passed from your body.

Two Weeks to Three Months After Quitting

  • Circulation improves.
  • Walking and running are easier.
  • Lung functioning increases up to 30%.

Six to Nine Months After Stopping Smoking

  • You’ll experience less coughing
  • Less sinus congestion
  • More energy (less tiredness and shortness of breath).

One Year – Happy Anniversary! Mark Your Calendar

  • Your risk of heart disease will be about half of what it would have been if you continued to smoke!

Five Years After Stopping Smoking

  • Your risk of stroke will be substantially reduced and you have a lot to look forward to. You are well into your recovery from the effects of tobacco addiction.
  • Within 5 to 15 years after quitting, it becomes about the same as a non-smokers.

After Ten Years Free From Addiction

  • Your risk of dying from lung cancer will be about half of what it would have been if you had continued to smoke.
  • Your risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney, and pancreas will also decrease.

After Fifteen Years – Congratulations

  • Your risk of dying from a heart attack is equal to a person who never smoked.

Yes, it does take time, but where will you be in fifteen years if you don’t stop smoking now? You may be one of the lucky ones like George Burns, but what are the odds of that?

Effects of Smoking on Circulation Can Lead to Amputations

Smoking effects our health in so many ways.

Just how does smoking addiction hurt you?

Narrowed and hardened arteries leading to atherosclerosis and gangrene, cold hands and feet, cold skin, decreased fitness, weakened bones,osteoporosis, peripheral vascular disease to name a few.

Smoking damages the blood vessels in the legs and arms leading to restricted circulation, ulcers, gangrene and even amputation of the limbs.

Circulation Restricted From SmokingOver 90% of cases of peripheral vascular disease which lead to amputation of one or both legs are caused by nicotine addiction and smoking – about 2000 amputations a year in the UK.

Source: Nosmokingday.org (UK)

Women Smokers Grow More Facial Hair

The effects of smoking can show up in ways you may not expect.

Although the mustache on the women in this picture is obviously fake, what we are about to tell you isn’t.

The Medical College of Wisconsin has reported a link between smoking and increased facial hair in some women.

Girl with Fake Moustache Women who smoke at least one pack of cigarettes a day have a fifty percent greater chance of growing more facial hair.

This study at the Medical College of Wisconsin has found increased facial hair in women apparently has something to do with the effects of smoking on the ovaries and the production of hormones.

So if you are a women smoker and find you are growing more facial hair as you age you could be adversely effecting your hormonal balance due to the risks of ingesting the chemicals in cigarettes.