Tag Archives: effects of nicotine

Nicotine in Cigarettes Contribute to Cluster Headaches and Migraines

Many people are plagued with chronic headaches and migraines and are mystified by what causes them. One probable cause could be second-hand smoke and, if you are a smoker, the act itself.

A visit to WebMD.com Migraines and Headaches health center explains how the nicotine contained in tobacco, when inhaled, will stimulate the blood vessels in the brain, causing them to constrict or narrow.

Smoking a cigarette will also cause the stimulated nerves in the back of the throat to magnify the problem.

Nicotine Hurts Your Head

Studies have also shown that cluster headaches—or headaches that keep returning for a period of time, such as two or three times a day for a week or even months—caused by second-hand smoke exposure were fully relieved once the migraine sufferer was no longer exposed to smoke.

Smokers suffering from cluster headaches have also found their headaches were reduced by 50% when they reduced smoking from a pack a day to half a pack, or by 50%. Doesn’t it make sense that quitting entirely could take care of the problem?

Smoking is a Headache

If you find headaches of any form a problem and all physical factors have been examined and ruled out, then toxicity in your body could be the leading cause.

If you are a cigarette smoker and are brave enough to smoke, then you should be brave enough to see the effects of a cluster headache. The following video will give you another reason to stop smoking now.

reference: http://www.webmd.com/migraines-headaches/guide/triggers-smoking

Crazy Cravings May Be Genetic

Individual brain chemistry and genes could be the key to understanding why some people become addicted to nicotine, University of Colorado at Boulder researchers say.

The depth of a person’s addiction to nicotine appears to depend on his or her unique internal chemistry and genetic make-up,  said lead author Jerry Stitzel, an assistant professor in CU-Boulder’s department of integrative physiology and researcher with CU-Boulder’s Institute for Behavioral Genetics.

It’s also why the chemical compound’s effects appear to diminish at night, said Stitzel, who presented his team’s findings in San Diego last week during the Neuroscience 2007, an annual scientific meeting.

Stitzel and his team set out to evaluate the effects of nicotine over the course of a day by examining mice that could make and “recognize” melatonin, a powerful hormone, and others that could not.

Scientists believe that melatonin, which is produced by darkness, tells our bodies when to sleep. The CU researchers found that the reduced effects of nicotine at night were dependent on the mice’s genetic make-up, and whether their brains and bodies were able to recognize melatonin.

Crave ImageThey also found that the daytime effects of nicotine were greatest when levels of the stress hormone corticosterone were high.

The second finding could explain why many smokers report that the first cigarette of the day is the most satisfying.

Cortisol, the human equivalent of corticosterone, is at peak levels in the early morning, Stitzel said.

“The negative health consequences of smoking have become well known, and a large majority of smokers say that they would like to quit,” Stitzel said. “As such, we need to understand the interaction between smoking, genes and internal chemistry so we can target new therapies to those who have a hard time quitting.”

While the team’s research could shed light on why people smoke, Stitzel says more research is needed to determine the role that melatonin plays in altering the effects of nicotine, and whether the correlation between higher corticosterone levels and nicotine sensitivity is a coincidence.

Researchers from Yale, Florida State, the University of Minnesota and the Baylor College of Medicine also presented findings based on research into the effects of smoking and nicotine.

Source: Colorado Daily

How Long After You Quit Smoking Does Healing Begin?

Healing from the effects of smoking is possible, but it does take time.

The following is a guideline to give you an idea how your immune system kicks in to clear the effects of smoking from your system and promote healing.

We know it is wise to give your system additional nutritional support when smoking, but don’t forget that after you quit you want to support your body with nutrition to help support physical healing.

Effects of Quitting Smoking – After Eight Hours

  • Carbon monoxide in your body drops.
  • Oxygen level in your blood increases to normal.

Two days After Quitting Smoking

  • Your sense of smell and taste will improve.
  • You will enjoy the taste of your food more.
  • Your risk of heart attack begins to decrease.

After Three of Four Days

  • Bronchial tubes relax.
  • Your lung capacity will have increased.
  • Breathing becomes easier.

After Two Weeks of Not Smoking

  • Blood flow improves; nicotine has passed from your body.

Two Weeks to Three Months After Quitting

  • Circulation improves.
  • Walking and running are easier.
  • Lung functioning increases up to 30%.

Six to Nine Months After Stopping Smoking

  • You’ll experience less coughing
  • Less sinus congestion
  • More energy (less tiredness and shortness of breath).

One Year – Happy Anniversary! Mark Your Calendar

  • Your risk of heart disease will be about half of what it would have been if you continued to smoke!

Five Years After Stopping Smoking

  • Your risk of stroke will be substantially reduced and you have a lot to look forward to. You are well into your recovery from the effects of tobacco addiction.
  • Within 5 to 15 years after quitting, it becomes about the same as a non-smokers.

After Ten Years Free From Addiction

  • Your risk of dying from lung cancer will be about half of what it would have been if you had continued to smoke.
  • Your risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney, and pancreas will also decrease.

After Fifteen Years – Congratulations

  • Your risk of dying from a heart attack is equal to a person who never smoked.

Yes, it does take time, but where will you be in fifteen years if you don’t stop smoking now? You may be one of the lucky ones like George Burns, but what are the odds of that?