Tag Archives: dangers of tobacco

SC Horry County Schools

Smoke Free Horry Education and Resource Center

Students in the Digital Art and Design program at the Academy for Technology and Academics in Myrtle Beach have helped create a marketing campaign aimed at educating others students about the dangers of smoking.

The Smoke Free Horry Eduction and Resource Center opened in Myrtle Beach Mall as a resource center where students can help counsel other students with a tobacco-free lifestyle.

Statistics note that 240,000 South Carolina students are exposed to second hand smoke each year. 103,000 of these kids will likely die prematurely as a result of this exposure. Each year, 6,300 South Carolina children under the age of 18 become smokers themselves.

Students Taking a Smoke-Free Stand

Horry County Schools is one of the only districts in the country with a 100% tobacco-free policy. The Smoke Free Horry Eduction and Resource Center features educational and promotional material designed by students. This project has been both a valuable learning process for the students as they have learned to create an entire campaign from idea stage to completion, as well as an effective peer-to-peer method of spreading information.

SC Horry County SchoolsIn addition to the informative brochures and unique displays featuring facts and statistics about smoking and its harmful effects, the Digital Art and Design students have created a game, designed tee shirts, and even offer backpacks and yo-yos as part of their promotional campaign spreading the smoke-free message.

Spreading the No-Tobacco Message

Students working on the Smoke Free Horry campaign have travelled to various schools to help spread their message. Teachers, school administrators, and others who have partnered with this group are impressed with the entire process and look forward to seeing the positive outcome of such an innovative campaign.

Horry County Schools hopes that through youth risk surveys administered year to year, students’ answers regarding tobacco issues will indicate the peer-to-peer informational campaign is working.

Reference: http://www.thesunnews.com/2011/09/21/2402086/smoke-free-center-to-open-with.html

States Ranked On Anti-Tobacco Campaign Spending For Kids

In a new report outlining the use of tobacco state by state New Hampshire has received a failing grade.

It was released jointly by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, American Heart Association, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network and American Lung Association.

The report, entitled “A Broken Promise to Our Children” ranked states on their cost associated with programs aimed at protecting kids from the dangers of tobacco, and ranked the state of New Hampshire a disappointing 41st.

The state spends 1.3 million dollars per year on anti-tobacco programs for kids, which is only 12% of the recommended spending amount.

Other states did not fair much better on the national ranking report.

North Carolina came in a disappointing 28th in anti-tobacco spending, offering a yearly allotment of just over 17 million dollars.

Massachusetts came in at number 33, only spending 12.8 million dollars per year on anti-tobacco campaigns aimed at kids.

“Massachusetts has made a modest improvement in protecting kids from tobacco, but budget cuts have reduced the effectiveness of what was once one of the nation’s best tobacco prevention programs,” said William V. Corr, executive director of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, in a statement.

Maine , Delaware and Colorado rounded out the top 3 states when it came to spending for anti-tobacco campaigns for kids.

Overall, the report found that as many as 30 states and the District of Columbia are spending less than half the CDC’s minimum amount recommended to be spent on anti-tobacco campaigns.

Source: Dogflu.ca

What Does Smoking Cigarettes Have to Do With Radioactive Radon Gas?

Tobacco research has discovered thousands of risks from the tar and chemicals in cigarettes.

Many people are not aware of just how many dangers there are from smoking tobacco, and this is one of those facts that is not widely known.

For over 40 years, tobacco researchers and tobacco corporations have known that cigarettes contain radionuclides.

Radioactive Radon Gas in CigarettesThe contamination is sourced in naturally occurring radioactive radon gas which is absorbed and trapped in apatite rock.

Apatite, or phosphate rock, is mined for the purpose of formulating the phosphate portion of most chemical fertilizers.

Polonium releases ionizing alpha radiation which is 20 times more harmful than either beta or gamma radiation when exposed to internal organs.

Passive Smoking Happens to Pets Too

Fluffy, Fido, and Tweety all suffer from the secondhand smoke of their owners, according to a growing body of literature that has looked at the issue, said Carolynn MacAllister, a veterinarian with the Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension Service.

Cats are twice as likely to develop malignant melanoma if they live with smokers as with nonsmokers.

This form of cancer kills three out of four felines within a year of its onset. Cats also are more likely to develop mouth cancers.

MacAllister said that cats’ grooming habits contribute to their risk. “Cats constantly lick themselves while grooming, they lick up the cancer-causing carcinogens that accumulate on their fur” and deposit relatively high concentrations of those chemicals into their mouths.

Dog with Face MaskLong nosed dogs suffer higher rates of nasal cancers as the carcinogens accumulate along those mucus membrane passageways. They seldom survive more than a year. In contrast, short nosed dogs do not filter the carcinogens as effectively, as a result, more of those deadly chemicals reach their lungs and they are more likely to develop lung cancer.

And feathered pets are not immune either. “A bird’s respiratory system is hypersensitive to any type of pollutant in the air,” MacAllister said. Living with a smoker makes birds particularly vulnerable to pneumonia and lung cancer. That is particularly true because caged birds cannot engage in vigorous flying that helps to clear the lungs of toxins.

“Curious pets can eat cigarettes and other tobacco products if they aren’t stored properly.” MacAllister warned. “This can cause nicotine poisoning, which can be fatal.”

Smokers themselves are 50 percent more likely to develop dementia than nonsmokers, according to a recent study of 7,000 people 55 or older that was conducted over seven years in the Netherlands.

“Smoking increases the risk of cerebrovascular disease and oxidative stress, which can damage cells in the blood vessels and lead to hardening of the arteries,” said lead researcher Dr. Monique Breteler of the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam.

Erectile dysfunction is a more immediate risk from smoking. A four-year study of 7,684 men in China, ages 35-74, found a statistical link between the number of cigarettes smoked and ED. It estimated that almost a quarter of all ED could be attributed to cigarettes.

And the habit is expensive, even before figuring in the added cost of Viagra. A study from New York City estimates that the average pack-a-day smoker burns up $2,500 a year with their habit.

It showed that low-income persons are more likely to try to quit smoking than those with a high income (68 versus 60 percent), but they are less likely to succeed in doing so.

Many private health plans and local health departments have developed programs to help people quite smoking. They often include free or reduced rates for counseling sessions and interventions such as nicotine gum or the patch.

For information about programs in San Francisco, visit the Tobacco Free Project’s Web site at http://sftfc.globalink.org/. For information statewide, call 1-800-NO-BUTTS. ~

Click to learn more about > Melanoma

~Bob Roehr, The Bay Area Reporter

Smokers Risk Damage to All Major Body Organs

Health Consequences of Smoking, Surgeon General’s Report

Smokers risk damage to almost all major organs in their bodies, according to the latest report by the surgeon general

The list of diseases caused by tobacco now includes cancers of the kidneys, stomach, cervix, and pancreas as well as leukemia, cataracts, pneumonia, and gum disease.

These illnesses are in addition to diseases previously known to be caused by smoking: bladder, esophageal, laryngeal, lung, oral, and throat cancers, chronic lung diseases, coronary heart and cardiovascular diseases, and sudden infant death syndrome.

Smoking also reduces overall health, contributing to conditions such as hip fractures, complications from diabetes, increased wound infections following surgery, and various reproductive problems.

Smoking cigarettes with lower machine-measured yields of tar and nicotine does not help.

Body Picture“There is no safe cigarette, whether it is called light, ultra-light, or any other name,” U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Richard Carmona commented. “The science is clear: the only way to avoid the health hazards of smoking is to quit completely or to never start smoking” (Health and Human Services, Press Release).

Statistics of Smoking Related Deaths

By current estimates, tobacco use causes 440,000 deaths per year and costs about $157 billion in health-related losses. An estimated 46,000 adults smoked in 2001. On average, men who smoke cut their lives short by 13.2 years, and female smokers lose 14.5 years. “Since the 1964 surgeon general’s report, more than 12 million people have died from smoking-related illness,” Dr. Carmona said.

“These include 4.1 million deaths from cancer, 5.5 million deaths from cardiovascular diseases, 2.1 million deaths from respiratory diseases, and 94,000 perinatal deaths. We’ve known for decades that smoking is bad for your health, but this [latest] report shows that it’s even worse than we knew. The toxins from cigarette smoke go everywhere the blood flows.”

Quitting smoking has immediate as well as long-term benefits, according to the surgeon general’s report. The heart rate drops towards normal and circulation improves. The risk of having a heart attack or stroke or of developing lung cancer diminishes. Even seniors who quit after many years can experience positive effects. A smoker who gives up the habit at the age of 65 reduces his or her risk of dying from a tobacco-related disease by half.

Learning More About Tobacco Use

The surgeon general’s report was based on a review of 1,600 articles. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has made these available to the public online on a searchable database (Health Consequence of Smoking, CDC Database).

For online tips and advice about how to quit smoking, see Tobacco Information and Prevention, and the American Cancer Society Guide to Quitting Smoking.

The American Cancer Society Guide provides a smoking cessation plan, explains how to deal with withdrawal and cravings, and lists useful anti-tobacco groups.

(Health Consequences of Smoking, Surgeon General’s Report).

Source: http://www.braytonlaw.com/news/mednews/091004_tobacco_surgeong.htm, a web site sponsored by the law firm of Brayton Purcell for educational purposes.

Smoking Addiction and the Human Choice

The past week I have seen two fatal accidents along the route 9 corridor heading towards Brattleboro, Vermont. Both could have been avoided if the drivers had not made bad decisions.

The first accident involved a left turn and the second accident involved a right turn. What did both drivers have in common?

They both risked their lives and the lives of others by making a turn in front of speeding traffic. They both probably thought that they could beat the odds of dying, and they both failed miserably.

Picture of CatViewing the aftermath of crushed metal horrifically flattened upon impact, is a painful and disturbing sight to see. The vehicles that had hosted life just moments before, now laid to rest as a testament that the stupidity of human choice can indeed kill you.

ASH (Action on Smoking & Health) states that “smoking has more than 50 ways of making life a misery through illness and more than 20 ways of killing you.” Imagine all you have to do is make the choice to smoke and you can have a smorgasbord of options to simply die for.

What’s on the menu today: lung cancer, kidney cancer, or maybe a dash of Ischemic heart disease? Come on how about it.

Or better yet, you can pick from a grab bag of assorted illnesses! How about acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis in twenty years, peripheral vascular disease in thirty years, or pneumonia next winter?

Rest assured that smoking is a very disturbing addiction. Though the act of smoking does not veer to the left or to the right, it does remain steady. Day after day, year after year the smoker lights cigarettes laced with radioactive ingredients and garnished with pesticides. Logically speaking self preservation alone should dictate absconding to higher ground. Perhaps smoking is a form of self-harming disease?