Tag Archives: cigarette toxins

Quit Smoking

Smoking a Cigarette is Like Drinking Formaldehyde

Each year in the state of Florida 28,000 people die from tobacco-related diseases.

Smoking and tobacco use amongst Floridians cost approximately $19.6 billion each year in health care costs and sickness.

Tobacco Free Florida exists to deter people from using tobacco products and to encourage those already using to quit using a powerful media campaign.

Tobacco Free Florida

The Tobacco Free Florida (TFF) program was established following a 2006 constitutional amendment where tobacco prevention programs were reinstated. The program is funded using money from tobacco settlement agreements.

Quit SmokingTFF offers on its website descriptive and honest reasons why people should quit smoking and using other products, such as smokeless tobacco. The site lists all the cancers that can occur from smoking or chewing, and even compares the health and wellness of a smoker to that of a non-smoker. For example, did you know that on average, a smoker will die thirteen to fourteen years before a non-smoker?

In addition to a section devoted to “quit tips,” the TFF site also offers online and telephone support. As an added incentive for people considering quitting, there are several video testimonials from former tobacco users who were able to overcome their addiction.

Known Carcinogen Formaldehyde in Cigarettes

There are thousands of chemicals in each cigarette, including chemicals that are known to cause cancer. For example, formaldehyde, the chemical used for preserving laboratory samples and dead bodies. This substance was classified by the US Department of Health and Human Services as a known human carcinogen in 2010.

Anticorrosion Benefits for Steel Derived from Cigarette Butts’ Toxins

There are estimates that gauge more than 4.5 trillion cigarette butts litter the streets and ground across the world on an annual basis.

Aside from the displeasing aesthetics of these butts, there are numerous environmental consequences of this toxic litter, including the leaching of chemicals into our waterways.

A team of researchers led by scientist Jun Zhao discovered a new use for this harmful garbage, one that has great benefits for the steel industry.

Putting Those Butts to Use

Chinese researchers from Xi’an Jiaotong University extracted chemicals from cigarette filters and their residual tobacco. The result? A successful transformation of the cigarettes’ chemicals into an anticorrosion treatment for steel.

After soaking the butts collected off the street in water for 24 hours, the researchers were able to identify 9 compounds—including nicotine—in the liquid using infrared and mass spectrometry. Next, the scientists put the solution through an hydrochloric acid process. The resulting solution was then applied on steel disks.

Corrosion Inhibitors

The researchers subjected the steel disks—N80 grade, typical for use in the oil industry—to harsh conditions that should lead the way for corrosion. The steel remained protected by the cigarette butt solution.

In fact, the researchers were successful in preventing corrosion on 95% of the steel disks on which the cigarette butt solution was applied. Zhao speculates the chemicals in the corrosion inhibiting solution coat the metal in a protective surface.

Healthy Steel, Unhealthy Lungs

At last there is a practical application for the cigarette litter found everywhere—from the streets, to the parks, to our waterways, and even our forests. Due to the extreme toxicity of the cigarette butts, there has been no recycling program previously established.

Another benefit from this study is now the steel industry has a new weapon to use in its expensive struggle against steel corrosion.

This research raises another crucial observation: If cigarette butts soaked in water can produce an anti-corrosion solution strong enough to work for steel, just imagine what those same chemicals do to smokers’ lungs and bodies.

Reference: Cigarette Butts Yield a Chemical Rebuttal [http://pubs.acs.org/cen/news/88/i16/8816news3.html]

What Do Nicotine, Sugar, Urine, and Arsenic Have in Common?

Who would ever think of putting nicotine, sugar, urine, and arsenic in the same sentence?

If you have ever smoked a cigarette you may not have to speak the words in a sentence together to experience their relationship.

Here are a few cigarette facts!

The Power of Nicotine

When inhaling the smoke from a cigarette, the nicotine content reaches the brain in only ten seconds. The first time smokers can tell you that from the dizzy buzz they feel.

Also, researchers have found just after smoking a cigarette the nicotine is found in every part of the body. Women who smoke will also find it in their breast milk shortly after lighting up. So babies consuming breast milk are also consuming nicotine on top of being exposed to second hand smoke.

This makes a person wonder why many major manufacturers of cigarettes are increasing the amount of tobacco they put in their deadly sticks. It is a fact that Harvard University and the Massachusetts Health Department discovered that between the years of 1997 bad 2005 Camel, Doral, and Newport increased nicotine content by as much as eleven percent.

Cigarette makers also have found a way to make the nicotine more potent. They combine the tobacco with active ingredients which are further enhanced with special production methods to ensure the nicotine strength is many times more potent that the natural nicotine substance found in the tobacco plant.

Cigarette Additives Include 20% Sugar

pic-sugarWe all know how habit forming nicotine is and its ill side effects. But not many realize that cigarettes also contain sugar.

Up to twenty percent of a cigarette contains sugar, which is one of the most unhealthy substances for those already dealing with diabetes.

No one really knows what happens when sugar is burned and how ingesting its smoke can effect the body. So really diabetics are taking in sugar just by smoking. Maybe this is one reason why many smokers are diabetics who have struggling immune systems.

To top this off, cigarette makers blend in a few toppings to sweeten the pot.

Here is a list of some of the cigarette topping ingredients:

  • clove
  • licorice
  • orange oil
  • apricot stone
  • lime oil
  • lavender oil
  • dill seed oil
  • cocoa
  • carrot oil
  • mace oil
  • myrrh
  • beet juice
  • bay leaf
  • oak
  • rum
  • vanilla
  • vinegar

Next on the list are 43 known carcinogens plus arsenic and formaldehyde. We also have been warned of how dangerous of lead poisoning so why would cigarettes contain this heavy metal? Why is there lead in cigarettes? You will also find: hydrogen cyanide, nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide,  and ammonia. Yum!

Are You Inhaling Yellow Smoke?

Now this next ingredient is very strange! Urea is a a chemical compound that is a major component in urine. Yep, urea is also added to cigarettes to enhance their flavor? Personally we don’t really quite understand why any component found in Urine would taste good.

Rather than naming the more than 4,000 ingredients contained in cigarettes, we will stop here. When someone passes you who is smoking after reading these cigarette facts you may be inclined to run the other direction as fast as you can!

Lighting Up While Driving Can Be Costly

This week’s tobacco news was filled with history making reports about congress signing off on regulation of tobacco by the FDA.

Many opinions are floating around. Some are in favor of it, while others are against the bill. Then there are those who like the idea but have concerns over the vast loopholes in the legislation.

Another story this week caught our attention. It is not as newsworthy, but on the other hand this story illustrates how the danger of second-hand smoke is making an impact.

In Toronto, Canada a recent law went into effect that regulates driving while under the influence of Tobacco. In the US, Louisiana and Arizona have similar laws, and many states are considering similar rules.

Driver Fined For “Lighting Up” in Car with Kids

The Star.com – June 11, 2009

smoking-while-drivingA women from Vaughan, Toronto, Canada was driving while smoking with three children in the car, all were under the age of eleven. She was stopped and cited under a recent law that took effect the first of the year.

The report did not say what she was fined, but offenders can be fined up to $250 for smoking in vehicles with children under the age of sixteen present.

There have been a handful of other charges, but it seems people are catching on to the effects of second-hand smoke and the dangers to children. Kids are really vulnerable because they absorb more toxins than adults. Their respiratory rates and metabolisms are higher due to their air intake to body weight ratio.

The Ontario Medical Association provided statistics on smoking in cars that is beyond alarming. The concentration from second-hand smoke in a vehicle can be up to twenty-seven percent higher than that of a smoker’s living environment, and up to twenty times higher that the smoke that floated in smoky bars prior to public smoking bans.

Raveena Aulakh, The Star Staff reporter