Tag Archives: cancer

Book Cover for Ending the Tobacco Holocaust

The Tobacco Holocaust: Actions to Take for a Tobacco-Free World

Psychiatrist Dr. Michael Rabinoff is the author of the award-winning book Ending the Tobacco Holocaust: How Big Tobacco Affects Our Health, Pocketbook, and Political Freedom—And What We Can Do About It (Elite Books).

In this book, Dr. Rabinoff offers readers great detail on every aspect of the tobacco industry as well as how we can easily regain control of our health and economic welfare.

Ending the Tobacco Holocaust also details what we as a society can do to protect ourselves and our loved ones from falling victim to the tobacco industry.

Tobacco: Health and Financial Suicide

Dr. Rabinoff, an avid researcher and writer on the effects of tobacco on health, the economy, and politics, talks about “health and financial suicide” in Ending the Tobacco Holocaust. By detailing the strategies Big Tobacco have to ensure consumers buy and keep buying their brands of cigarettes, Dr. Rabinoff hopes to empower both smokers and non-smokers to save lives from this preventable “holocaust.”

Book Cover for Ending the Tobacco HolocaustDr. Rabinoff was motivated to write this book because he has played witness throughout his medical and psychiatric career to the devastating effects smoking has on the body, the mind, and interpersonal relationships. From witnessing people with cancer and tumors, suffering from strokes and heart attacks, to their loved ones also trying to cope with these preventable smoking-related diseases, Dr. Rabinoff calls the tobacco industry and the act of smoking a “war” that goes on every day. He discusses ways in which people can help fight this war and combat the effects it has on stress and coping levels.

Free Book Offer

Dr. Rabinoff states that he shared his observations, concerns, and tips for action with readers in order to “educate and empower people to take simple actions that will create a better world for everyone.”

Toward a Tobacco-Free World is the e-book version of Dr. Rabinoff’s Ending the Tobacco Holocaust. Anyone concerned for themselves or their loved ones over the health and economic effects of smoking can download this resource and learn what a tobacco-free world will be like.

For your free e-book, please click > Toward a Tobacco-Free World

Smoking Ups Colon Cancer Risk

Italian researchers recently reported that smoking cigarettes ups the the risk of getting colorectal cancer by 18 percent and the risk of malignancy by about 25 percent.

This study is published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (December 17, 2008).

Smoking cigarettes does a lot of damage to your body.

Organs that have direct contact with carcinogens from smoking are more likely to become affected by cancer. These organs include: lungs, throat, larynx, oropharynx, and the upper digestive tract. Organs that have indirect exposure to carcinogen from smoking include: pancreas, bladder, cervix, kidneys, rectum and colon. These organs also have an increased chance of becoming affected by cancer.

smelly ciggy“Smoking is significantly associated with colorectal cancer incidence and mortality,” said the study’s lead author, Edoardo Botteri, a biostatistician in the division of epidemiology and biostatistics at the European Institute of Oncology in Milan, Italy.

Read more about it at HealthDay News

Smoking-Related Illnesses Come with Significant Costs

Nicotine dependence is the physical vulnerability to the chemical nicotine, which is potently addicting when delivered by various tobacco products.

Smoke from cigarettes, cigars and pipes contains thousands of chemicals, including nicotine.

Being addicted to tobacco brings a host of health problems related to the substances in tobacco smoke. These effects include damage to the lungs, heart and blood vessels.

According to the American Lung Association, smoking cost the United States over $193 billion in 2004, including $97 billion in lost productivity and $96 billion in direct health care expenditures, or an average of $4,260 per adult smoker.

Vintage Photo Girl SmokingWhen people inhale, they are ingesting a chemical parade that marches through the body’s vital organs. Mayo Clinic.com reviews the negative health effects throughout the body, including:

Lungs. Smoking is the cause of most cases of lung cancer. Smoking also is the primary cause of other lung problems, such as emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic bronchitis.

Heart and circulatory system. Smoking increases your risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. If people smoke more than 25 cigarettes daily, they have five times the risk of heart disease compared to someone who doesn’t smoke.

Cancer. Smoking is a major cause of cancer of the esophagus, larynx, throat (pharynx) and mouth and contributes to cancer of the bladder, pancreas, liver, kidney, cervix, stomach, colon and rectum, and some leukemias.

Appearance. The chemicals in tobacco smoke can dry and irritate the skin, as well as promote wrinkles. Smoking also yellows teeth, fingers and fingernails.

Fertility. Smoking increases the risk of infertility and miscarriage in women and the risk of impotence and infertility in men.

Senses. Smoking deadens the senses of taste and smell, so food isn’t as appetizing as it once was.For most people, smoking cessation is difficult. In fact, quitting smoking might be one of the most challenging things an individual ever does. A feature on MayoClinic.com explains why smoking cessation matters, what to expect and how to stick with it.

Rochester, MN (PRWEB) October 10, 2008 

About the Mayo Clinic Website

Launched in 1995 and visited more than 15 million times a month, this award-winning Web site offers health information, self-improvement and disease management tools to empower people to manage their health.

Produced by a team of Web professionals and medical experts, MayoClinic.com gives users access to the experience and knowledge of the more than 3,300 physicians and scientists of Mayo Clinic.

MayoClinic.com offers intuitive, easy-to-use tools such as “Symptom Checker” and “First-Aid Guide” for fast answers about health conditions ranging from common to complex; as well as an A-Z library of more than 850 diseases and conditions, in-depth sections on 24 common diseases and conditions, 16 healthy living areas including food and nutrition, recipes, fitness and weight control, videos, animations and features such as “Ask a Specialist” and “Drug Watch.”

Users can sign up for a free weekly e-newsletter called “Housecall” which provides the latest health information from Mayo Clinic.

For more information, visit > The MayoClinic.com – Nicotine dependence

A Statement from Lung Cancer Alliance on the Death of Paul Newman

PRNewswire-USNewswire via COMTEX — Lung Cancer Alliance President and CEO Laurie Fenton-Ambrose issued the following statement:

All of us at Lung Cancer Alliance, our Board, our advocates and the patients, families and caregivers we represent, extend our deepest sympathy to the wife and family of Paul Newman.

Mr. Newman was an icon of the American stage and film, loved by audiences around the world. He and his devoted and equally talented wife, Joanne Woodward, also changed the lives of people in the United States and around the world through their many philanthropic projects.

Two months ago reports began to appear in the press that Mr. Newman was undergoing treatment for lung cancer. Many of those reports referred to him a “former chain smoker” with all the insinuations inherent in that label.

Picture of Paul NewmanMr. Newman was first and foremost a great man and we mourn his passing.

Over 215,000 people will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year, and the majority will die within 12 months. More people die from lung cancer than breast, prostate, colon, kidney, melanoma and liver cancers combined.

Over half of them are former smokers many of whom quit decades ago and did not even realize that they will always be at higher risk. Another 15% have never smoked at all. Yet, the stigma and the blame associated with lung cancer, and the small number of people who survive to fight this, have made lung cancer the least funded of the major cancers in federal research dollars per death.

Our commitment to all who have died and to all those families that have been hurt by this deadly disease is: We will change this.

Lung Cancer Alliance is the only national non-profit organization dedicated exclusively to patient support and advocacy for those living with or at risk for lung cancer.

Lung Cancer Alliance is committed to leading the movement to reverse decades of stigma and neglect by empowering those with or at risk for the disease, elevating awareness and changing health policy.

SOURCE Lung Cancer Alliance

Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis at Increased Risk of Lung Cancer

Reuters Health Report

Recently researchers found a link between the risk of lung cancer and rheumatoid arthritis.

The article reported that the risk of lung cancer is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, even after taking into account the effects of tobacco and asbestos exposure, according to a case-control study in US military veterans.

Using a Veterans Health Administration database, Dr. Ritu Khurana, at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, and fellow researchers obtained medical records for approximately 480,000 patients treated between 1998 and 2004, including 7280 diagnosed with lung cancer and 8678 diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis.

The incidence of rheumatoid arthritis was 3.4% among lung cancer patients and 1.8% among controls, the investigators report in the Journal of Rheumatology for September.

After controlling for age, gender, tobacco and asbestos exposure, patients with rheumatoid arthritis were at significantly greater risk for lung cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 1.43).

The association grew stronger with age, Dr. Khurana’s group reports.

The authors note that a recent concern over the potential risks associated with anti-TNF therapy were not relevant to this population during a period when such therapy was not widely available.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Link to Lung CancerIn a related editorial, Dr. Henrik Kallberg, of Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, makes the point that “it is not clear…whether the increased risk of developing cancer is due to coexisting risk factors such as smoking, to rheumatoid arthritis disease itself, to rheumatoid arthritis treatment, or simply to earlier detection of cancer because of intense medical surveillance.”

Source: J Rheumatol 2008;35:1695-1696,1704-1708.

Small Changes Can Help Prevent Cancer

Making small changes could make a big difference in preventing cancer.

Avoid preventable risk factors by incorporating these guidelines into of your lifestyle.

Three choices can make a vast difference in increasing your odds for staying healthy and keeping yourself in check.

Don’t Smoke Tobacco

Smoking damages nearly every organ in the human body, is linked to at least 15 different cancers, accounts for about 30 percent of all cancer deaths and costs billions of dollars each year, according to the American Cancer Society.

In the United States, cigarette smoking is responsible for about 90 percent of all cases of lung cancer — the leading cause of cancer death. Smoking cigars and pipes or chewing tobacco isn’t safe either.

“The importance of not smoking cannot be over emphasized in the prevention of cancer,” says Dr. Thomas Johnson, oncologist with Sacred Heart Medical Oncology Group. “Quitting is imperative for anyone who uses tobacco. Even people who have used tobacco for many years reduce their risk of cancer by quitting, as compared to people who continue to use tobacco.”

Toss Cigarettes Away“The predisposition for lung cancer does run in families,” Johnson says. “Smokers with relatives who have contracted lung cancer are at extremely high risk for developing cancer themselves, due to their genetic makeup.

You will often see multiple cases of lung cancer in a family that has a history of COPD, emphysema or lung cancer — those family members are predisposed to cancer and should not smoke.

Tobacco use alone increases their risk of cancer by 10 to 20 percent.”

Eat Healthy Foods and Get Regular Exercise

Fully one-third of cancer deaths are linked to poor diet, physical inactivity and carrying excess weight.

The American Cancer Society recommends that you limit foods high in fat, eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables each day and limit alcohol, if you drink it at all. Include moderate physical activity (such as brisk walking) for at least 30 minutes on most days of the week to help achieve or maintain a healthy weight.

“Being overweight increases cancer risk by causing the body to produce and circulate more of the hormones estrogen and insulin, which can stimulate cancer growth,” said Dr. Dee McLeod, oncologist with Sacred Heart Medical Oncology Group. “Studies suggest that people whose diet is high in fat have an increased risk of cancers of the colon, uterus and prostate. Lack of physical activity and being overweight are risk factors for cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, kidney and uterus.”

Avoid Harmful Sun Exposure

Most skin cancer occurs on exposed parts of your body, including your face, hands, forearms and ears. When going out in the sun keep these tips in mind: Avoid peak hours of the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) radiation between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., stay in the shade, cover exposed skin with clothes and hats and use sunscreen that has a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15.Get immunized

Certain cancers are associated with viral infections that can be prevented with immunizations. Talk to your doctor about immunization against Hepatitis B and the Human Papilloma Virus.

Get Health Screenings

“For many types of cancer, by the time that there are symptoms, the cancer is too far advanced to achieve a cure,” McLeod says. “Cancer screenings identify those at high-risk for cancer, and to be most useful, must detect cancers before symptoms would cause a person to seek care. Early detection is so often a key factor in successful treatment.”

Screenings should include tests to detect cancers of your skin, mouth, colon and rectum. If you’re a man, it should also include your prostate and testes. If you’re a woman, add cervix and breast cancer screening to your list. Visit www.cancer.org to find the American Cancer Society Guidelines for Early Detection of Cancer.

For more information on cancer prevention and treatment, visit The SacredHeart Cancer Center.

Bigger Belly May Up Smokers’ Lung Cancer Risk

Reuters Health – Smokers who carry more weight around their waistlines may be at greater risk of lung cancer, according to a new study.

The finding, along with the fact that lung cancer risk is actually higher among leaner smokers, provides “intriguing” evidence that how a smoker stores fat could play a role in his or her likelihood of developing lung cancer, Dr. Geoffrey C. Kabat of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York, told Reuters Health.

Several studies have found that a lower body mass index (BMI) means a higher lung cancer risk among smokers. “Reflex explanations” for the link include the fact that smokers are skinnier than non-smokers, Kabat noted in an interview, as well as the tendency for people to gain weight after they quit smoking.

Another proposed mechanism for the relationship is that people lose weight when they develop lung cancer.

But careful analysis of the data doesn’t bear out these explanations, Kabat said. To better understand the relationship, he and his colleagues looked at data from the Women’s Health Initiative.

Over the course of 8 years, 1,365 of the study’s 161,809 participants developed lung cancer. When the researchers looked at BMI after adjusting for weight circumference, they found that both smokers and ex-smokers with lower BMIs had a greater lung cancer risk.

But when they looked at waist circumference independent of BMI, they found that a larger waistline conferred a greater likelihood of lung cancer for smokers and ex-smokers. There was no relationship between BMI or waist circumference and lung cancer risk among never-smokers.

The findings, reported in the American Journal of Epidemiology, must be confirmed by other investigators, and don’t offer any clues on the mechanism behind the relationship, Kabat noted.

belly fatHowever, he speculated, “it may have to do with the storage, the mobilization, and the metabolization of carcinogens. These carcinogens … tend to be stored in fat tissue. That may play a role in the development of lung cancer. It may be that it’s linked to smoking but that it plays a role on top of smoking.”

He added: “We’re not ready to give people advice, because overall the advice would not be changed. We’re not advocating that people lose weight so that they have a lower risk of lung cancer. Smoking is so far and away the dominant risk factor.”

News Source: American Journal of Epidemiology, July 15, 2008.

Anne Harding, Cancerpage.com